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Tuesday, October 29, 2019 at 4:00 PM, Humanities Rm 1008

Jeffrey Santa Ana, English Department

“Empire and Environment: Confronting Ecological Ruin in Asia, the Pacific, and the Americas”

Santa Ana’s discusses his co-edited book volume which examine cultural works from the Asia-Pacific and the Americas that depict today’s evidential matter of environmental ruin and reclamation in these regions in a time of neo-imperial development.

Bayreuth festival hall 1956

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 4:00 PM, Humanities Rm 1008

Ryan Minor, Music Department

“Missing in Action: Searching for Opera Audiences in Early German Film”

This series If much of the justification for cinema in Weimar Germany was the medium’s pedagogical potential, it is nonetheless striking that scenes of operatic spectatorship are so rare in a medium that otherwise relied heavily on opera as both generating muse and referential object.  This talk seeks to situate this curious lack within both the discourse surrounding Weimar and Nazi film and the—eternally—concurrent search for suitable audiences for German opera itself.

Ryan Minor                                               Ryan Minor is Associate Professor in the Music Department, where has taught since 2005.  He is the author of Choral Fantasies: Music, Festivity, and Nationhood in 19th-Century Germany (Cambridge, 2012) and articles on Wagner, Liszt, Brahms, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and operatic spectatorship.  A former editor of The Opera Quarterly, he is currently writing a history of German bourgeois opera and its publics.
Jeffrey Santa Ana Jeffrey Santa Ana is Associate Professor of English and associated faculty in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and in Asian and Asian American Studies. He is the author of  Racial Feelings: Asian America in a Capitalist Culture of Emotion. His current book-in-progress is Transpacific Ecological Imagination: Envisioning the Asia-Pacific Anthropocene.