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Semester by the Sea: Courses

FALL SEMESTER

View the updated  Fall 2020 schedule overview

Students participate in three core* courses:

Long Island Marine Habitats  (MAR 303, 4 credits)  SBC: STEM+  SPK
A field intensive course emphasizing the marine organisms and ecosystems of Eastern Long Island.

Coastal Culture Experience  (MAR 355, 2 credits)  SBC: ESI, EXP+     SPK
A course which complements the Maritime Traditions course by taking students on extended trips to locations in Long Island and New England which have shaped maritime culture in the region.

Maritime Traditions of New England  (MAR 356, 3 credits)  SBC: SBS, USA    WRTD
A humanities course in which students explore the development of maritime culture and traditions in New York and New England.

Students also select at least two electives from the following courses:

Experimental Marine Biology   (MAR 305, 3 credits)  SBC: STEM+
Students design and conduct experiments in the laboratory and at local field sites, collect and analyze data, and use scientific literature to interpret and present results in papers and oral presentations.

Chemical Oceanography (MAR 351, 3 credits)  SBC: STEM+ 
Usually teleconferenced (offered concurrently at both main and Southampton campuses), but online for Fall 2020
An exploration of chemical principles applied to the study of the oceans. Students learn how chemical tracers are used to determine the geological, physical, and biological characteristics of present and past oceans. Other topics include physical marine chemistry, nutrient and carbon cycling, organic geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, sediment chemistry and diagenesis, air-sea exchange and controls on carbon dioxide, and estuarine geochemistry.

Physical Oceanography   (MAR 352, 3 credits)  SBC: STEM+
This course introduces students to the physics of the marine environment and the tools (physical, mathematical, scientific) to study these waters.  Environments ranging from pelagic to estuarine will be examined during trips aboard research vessels.

Ichthyology  (MAR 380, 3 credits)     SBC: ESI     WRTD & SPK
Students explore the diversity of fishes and the physiological, anatomical, ecological, and behavioral adaptations that allow them to populate a wide range of niches and environments. Field and laboratory work provide students with practical experience in collecting, identifying, and studying fish.

Research in Marine Sciences  (MAR 487, 1-3 credits)  SBC: EXP+
There are many opportunities to gain valuable research experience while at the Southampton campus.  Students can explore their own interests while contributing to ongoing projects in coastal marine ecology.  Click on the course link to learn more about this option. 

Internship (MAR 488, 1-3 credits)  SBC: EXP+
Students often participate in volunteer or paid internships at businesses, governmental agencies, or advocacy groups and other non-governmental organizations near the Southampton campus.  Click on the course link above for descriptions of internship options, or suggest your own!

SPRING SEMESTER

View the Spring 2020 schedule overview.

Students create their schedule from the following courses:

Marine Conservation (MAR 315, 3 credits)  SBC: ESI, STAS     SPK
The fundamental concepts of Conservation Biology, a new synthetic field that incorporates principles of ecology, biogeography, population genetics, systematics, evolutionary biology, environmental sciences, sociology, anthropology, and philosophy toward the conservation of biological diversity.

Biological Oceanography (MAR 349, 4 credits)
An examination of the processes which produce and maintain the abundances, composition, and temporal variations of organisms in the ocean.

Unsinkable Technologies (MAR 357, 3 credits)   SBC: STAS     WRT
An examination of the historical impact of selected technologies on the maritime world. Students investigate topics such as how the problem of longitude was solved to the technology of the “unsinkable” Titanic and the science behind the discovery of its grave site.  They will also explore how the fishing industry has been shaped by changes in technology including Loran, GPS and new technologies such as TED (turtle excluder device).

Marine Apex Predators (MAR 373, 3 credits)
Students will (1) review the biology of key marine apex predators, (2) explore how 'top down' processes (predation and intimidation of prey) can influence marine ecosystems and (3) review the status of marine apex predators and how this relates to the current state of ocean ecosystems.

Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Rehabilitation  (MAR 375, 3 credits)
Students will be exposed to marine mammal and sea turtle ecology, conservation issues, management, and research in the context of wildlife rehabilitation. Through active participation in the rehabilitation activities at the New York State's only marine mammal rescue facility, the New York Marine Rescue Center; instructive lectures; writing; reading assignments; quizzes; tests; and research, students will be offered the opportunity to be thoroughly immersed in the field of marine mammal and sea turtle rehabilitation.

Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles  (MAR 376, 3 credits)
This course provides an overview of the biology of sea turtles and highlights different solutions to challenges these organisms face while living in the marine environment. We begin by discussing biological adaptations and ecological processes, and then examine these concepts in relation to conservation and management issues facing different sea turtle species. This course will be primarily lecture-based, although we will take advantage of additional learning opportunities, such as necropsies conducted with the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society.

Field Techniques in Marine Mammal Science (MAR 395 - Special Topics, 3 credits)
Through lectures, discussions, and field trips, students are introduced to the technologies and techniques used by marine mammal scientists to assess and monitor populations of cetaceans and pinnipeds, both globally and locally.  Spring field work focuses on local pinniped monitoring efforts of the Coastal Research & Education Society of Long Island.  Class meeting times are usually < 3 hours except during field trips when students can expect to meet for the scheduled 4 hours.

Research in Marine Sciences (MAR 487, 1-3 credits)  SBC: EXP+
There are many opportunities to gain valuable research experience while at the Southampton campus.  Students can explore their own interests while contributing to ongoing projects in coastal marine ecology.  Click on the course link to learn more about this option. 

Internship (MAR 488, 1-3 credits)  SBC: EXP+
Students often participate in volunteer or paid internships at businesses, governmental agencies, or advocacy groups and other non-governmental organizations near the Southampton campus.  Click on the course link above for descriptions of internship options, or suggest your own!

During either semester, SBU students participating in the Semester by the Sea can also enroll in courses at the main campus.  And, SBU students can live at main campus and take Southampton courses.
Limited shuttle bus service between campuses is provided.  If selecting this option, students must check their schedule carefully and allow adequate travel time.

* Core courses are required for visiting students and highly recommended for current SBU students.