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  • AAS 212: AAS Topics in Humanities

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HUM

    Using methodologies of the Humanities disciplines, such as literature, linguistics, classics, cultural studies, philosophy, religious studies, art history and criticism, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American Studies. Topics may range from Women in Japanese fiction to Mahatma Gandhi's impact on politics and ethics. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16569530Chinese Popular Culture Yi WangOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 16569631Exhibiting Asia In The Us Jinyoung JinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AAS 260: Buddhism

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introduction to the basic philosophy and doctrines of Buddhism, beginning with a survey of lives and works of major historical figures of Buddhism. The principal issues of Buddhist thought, drawing from Indian, East Asian, and Western sources, are treated. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of faith, practice, and enlightenment in Buddhism. This course is offered as both AAS 260 and RLS 260.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16244130Mary DiazOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as AAS 260 and RLS 260

    Session 26428431Mary DiazOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as AAS 260 and RLS 260

  • AAS 280: Islam

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16360001Mohsen SaberOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as AAS 280 and RLS 280

  • AAS 327: Great Epics of India

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    The themes, characters, and plots of Ramayana and Mahabharata are analyzed in detail. The moral dilemmas presented and their sometimes controversial solutions are explored in the context of "dharma", or righteousness--the central concept of Hiduism. The course will compare the two epics with each other.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26537230Ian NicolayOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AAS 371: Ancient China

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: J SBC: SBS+

    Explores the development of social, economic, political, and cultural systems in ancient China, from the neolithic period through the Han dynasty. Draws on archaeological data and historical texts to examine the emergence of state-level polities and their subsequent unification under imperial authority. Analytical focus is on political economy, social organization, ritual exchange, and notions of power and rulership expressed in philosophical thought. This course is offered as both AAS 371 and ANT 371.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16569930Gregory RufOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ACC 210: Financial Accounting

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Business Major or BUS Minor or ACC Minor or MTD or ECO or ISE Major

    This course presents an introduction to fundamental financial accounting principles, concentrating on identifying, recording, and communicating the economic events of a business organization. Topics include the accounting cycle, the preparation and presentation of the income statement, retained earnings statement and balance sheet, and an in-depth exploration of the measure and presentation of assets and liabilities.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6189831Carl AlloccaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • ACC 214: Mngrl Cost Analysis and App

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS major or ACC minor or ISE Major

    A study of cost concepts, and theories as it relates to cost accumulation systems for product, process and activity based costing, as well as the implementation and evaluation of an accounting system as a source of information for decision making, planning, control, and evaluation of the organization by management. Includes cost-volume-profit analysis, overhead rates, budgeting and variance analysis, statement of cash flows and financial statement ratio analysis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6190330Rocco SabinoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ACC 311: Federal Income Taxation I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s): BUS major or ACC minor

    Introduces and explores fundamental income taxation concepts for individuals. Topics include gross income, exclusions, adjusted gross income, deductions, exemptions, tax computations, and credits. Introductory tax concepts, including cash and accrual methods, property acquisitions and dispositions, like-kind exchanges, and passive loss rules are also reviewed. Additionally, students will familiarize themselves with tax planning concepts, the legislative process, and professional responsibilities in tax practice.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6190901Ronald StundaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ACC 400: External Auditing

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s): BUS Major or ACC minor and ACC 210

    The course is designed to introduce and explore basic auditing principles, concepts and applications within the context of the audit of an annual financial statement. This course will review the audit process and cover the following: planning (identification of the risks of material misstatement); application of procedures (reducing audit risk below an acceptable level); assessment (based upon documented audit evidence); and, reporting (in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards) This course will also examine professional ethical standards and their relevance to the audit process. Other topics will include analysis and testing of internal control, substantive testing, and accounting research.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26536901Rocco SabinoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AFH 249: Afro-Amer Lit, Music 19c & 20c

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. category B or D course or one HUM or ARTS course

    DEC: K SBC: HFA+

    A detailed look at African-American literature and music and their importance for American literature and music of the 19th and 20th centuries. An examination of the literature with attention to the special stylistic devices, tones of literary voice, and characterization that writers use in their efforts to match the music experience with the written word. Selections from the recordings of African-American and African-American inspired musicians -- from Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong to Jimi Henrix and the Rolling Stones.This course is offered as both AFH 249 and EGL 249.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16358430Tracey WaltersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26536431Tracey WaltersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AFH 282: Contemp. Carib Women's Lit

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: DIV; GLO; HUM

    Examines the political, social, and historical experiences of women from anglophone francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean nations. The readings, movies, and projects selected for the course highlight reccurent themes in Caribbean literature such as exile, migration, identity, colorism, slavery, sexual oppression, transnational motherhood, and identity politics. Feminist criticism, Postcolonialsm, and critical race theory will be applied to our reading of the texts. This course is offered as both AFS 282 and WST 282.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16358601Tracey WaltersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as AFH 282 and WST 282

  • AFH 368: Carib/Ameri Connections in Lit

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    An exploration of the connections between writers from the French-speaking and English-speaking Caribbean and from the African-American community, who share a similar cultural heritage, historical heritage, and historical experience, but differ in geopolitical situations. Special attention is paid to spirituality, gender, and identity motifs in the literature. Covers the Interdisciplinary topic for the English major. This course is offered as both AFH 368 and EGL 368.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26429330T OlosundeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AFS 325: Civil Rights and Black Power

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: K&4 SBC: SBS+

    The course considers how the 'long civil rights movement' and century-long struggles for Black Power were interwined movements, rather than conventional narratives that conceive them as being opposed to one another. The course will therefore span the whole of the twentieth century, beginning with the founding of the United Negro Improvement Association and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and it will conclude with the turn from civil rights to economic justice, Black political empowerment, and campaigns against police brutality. Offered as both AFS 325 and HIS 325.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26419730Gregory LellaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AFS 370: African-American Family

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

    DEC: K SBC: HFA+; USA

    The African-American family from the early 1800's to the present day. The nature and structure of that family, the obstacles it has faced, and its interrelationships with the African-American community and the diversity of American society.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16253030Rita NezamiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • AFS 374: Environ/Dev in African History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; SBS+

    Provides a critical exploration of the history and political-economy of environmental changes and human activities in Africa from earlier times to the present. It examines the ways in which the dynamics of human-environment relationship have shaped the development of African societies and economies from the rise of ancient civilizations to the contemporary problems of war and famine. Although significant attention will be given to the pre-colonial era (like the impacts of iron-working, irrigation, deforestation and desertification), the focus of the course will be on the 20th and century and after, looking at the impacts of imperialism, colonialism, globalization and the postcolonial quest for development on the state of the environment in Africa. In the discussion, we will demonstrate that the shaping of African environments and ecologies is a product of complex, evolving and interconnected developments between humans and nature within and beyond the African continent. Offered as both AFS 374 and SUS 374. Not for credit in addition to SBC 320 or SBC 374.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16358530Shimelis GulemaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AFS 381: AIDS, Race, Gender/Black Cmmty

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: SBS+

    Review of current biological and epidemiological knowledge about the HIV virus, and examination of the virus' social impact on the Black community. This course is offered as both AFS 381 and WST 381.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26428930Antoine JohnsonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AFS 383: Global African Diaspora

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

    DEC: J SBC: DIV; GLO; SBS+

    Provides a conceptual and thematic exploration of the principal issues and forces in the socio-cultural and political history of the global African diaspora. Temporally, the course focuses the pre-16th century, the 16th-20th centuries, and the more recent period. Spatially, the course investigates, by comparing, the experiences of both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean/Red Sea African diasporas and teases out their commonalities and divergences. Thematically, the course will help students develop a deeper and critical understanding of how and why African diasporic identities emerged, converged and diverged over the centuries. Students will engage in class discussions and debates, making presentations, and writing reflective/evaluative papers on the issues as well as on readings, documentaries, and movies used in the class.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26538830Shimelis GulemaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AIM 100: EOP Pre-Freshman Su Acad Bridg

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    New AIM/EOP students

    The purpose of the EOP Summer Academic Bridge course is to give students a foundation in math, writing, and a science related to their undergraduate goals. The course will build on their current skills with the goal of increasing the likelihood of their academic success in these areas during their first full semester at Stony Brook University. Students will be placed in the appropriate section based on the university placement recommendations in math and writing. The EOP Summer Academic Bridge will be supported through the EOP Transitional Support Bridge course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26539301Pamela MatznerIn PersonMon. & Weds.01:45-04:45PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26539301Pamela MatznerIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:00-12:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AIM 101: EOP Pre-Freshman Su Supp Bridg

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    New AIM/EOP students

    The purpose of the EOP Summer Bridge course is to build a strong, supportive foundation by introducing the necessary support and resources needed to be successful at Stony Brook University. The course will build on their current skills with the goal of increasing the likelihood of the student¿s success in acclimating to college and Stony Brook University culture and lifestyle. Additionally, the course goal is to help students navigate the challenges that stem from socioeconomic disadvantage. In addition, this course will support the EOP Academic Bridge course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26539501Pamela MatznerIn PersonFriday09:00-12:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26539501Pamela MatznerIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:45-03:05PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265394R01Pamela MatznerIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.07:00-08:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 102: Elements of Statistics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of entry skill in mathematics requirement (Skill 1) or satisfactory compl etion of D.E.C. C or QPS; Non AMS majors only Anti-requisite: May not be taken by students with credit for AMS 110 or AMS 310.

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    The use and misuse of statistics in real life situations; basic statistical measures of central tendency and of dispersion, frequency distributions, elements of probability, binomial and normal distributions, small and large sample hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, chi square test, and regression. May not be taken by students with credit for AMS 110, 310, 311, 312; ECO 320; POL 201; PSY 201; or SOC 202. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26496030TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26496030Bakhtavar HagedornOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 103: Applied Math in Technology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Level 3 or higher on the mathematics placement examination

    SBC: QPS; TECH

    Technologies that drive our modern world rely critically on applied mathematics. This course explores "How does it work?" for selected technologies that rely on mathematics and statistics, e.g., internet search, social networking, financial markets, online auctions, cell phones, DNA sequencing, GPS, Wii, Google maps, and more.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26447930David KraemerOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 104: Spreadsheet Technology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Level 2+ or higher on the mathematics placement examination or MAT 123 or higher

    SBC: QPS; TECH

    Spreadsheets are a critically important tool in many careers, particularly in quantitative fields. This course explores how to use spreadsheets and how to use them to model real-world situations, such as project management, optimization, budgeting, finance, and more.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16340030Fred RispoliOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 110: Probability & Stat Life Scienc

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 151 or MAT 125 or 131 or 141. Anti-requisite: May not be taken by students with credit for AMS 102 or AMS 310

    SBC: QPS

    A survey of probability theory and statistical techniques with applications to biological and biomedical situations. Topics covered include Markov chain models; binomial, Poisson, normal, exponential, and chi square random variables; tests of hypotheses; confidence intervals; tests; and analysis of variance, regression, and contingency tables. May not be taken for credit in addition to AMS 310. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26448030TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26448030Bakhtavar HagedornOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 151: Applied Calculus I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: B or higher in MAT 123 or level 5 on the mathematics placement examination

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    A review of functions and their applications; analytic methods of differentiation; interpretations and applications of differentiation; introduction to integration. Intended for CEAS majors. Not for credit in addition to MAT 125 or 126 or 131 or 141 or 171. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320430William BernhardOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • AMS 161: Applied Calculus II

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141, or level 7 on the mathematics placement exam ination

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    Analytic and numerical methods of integration; interpretations and applications of integration; differential equations models and elementary solution techniques; phase planes; Taylor series and Fourier series. Intended for CEAS majors. Not for credit in addition to MAT 127, MAT 132, MAT 142, or MAT 171. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16314030William BernhardOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 210: Applied Linear Algebra

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141 or corequisite MAT 126 or level 7 or higher on the mathemati cs placement exam

    SBC: STEM+

    An introduction to the theory and use of vectors and matrices. Matrix theory including systems of linear equations. Theory of Euclidean and abstract vector spaces. Eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Linear transformations. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 211.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26448230Hyun-Kyung LimOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 261: Applied Calculus III

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 161 or MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or MPE level 9

    SBC: STEM+

    Vector algebra and analytic geometry in two and three dimensions; multivariable differential calculus and tangent planes; multivariable integral calculus; optimization and Lagrange multipliers; vector calculus including Green's and Stokes's theorems. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 203 or 205.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16310330Jacob CrosserOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:00-01:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 300: Writing in Applied Mathematics

    Undergraduate 1 credit

    Prerequisites: WRT 102; AMS major; U3 or U4 standing

    SBC: SPK; WRTD

    See Requirements for the Major in Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Upper Division Writing Requirement.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165724S01Francesca PoloOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-02:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 301: Finite Mathematical Structures

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 210 or MAT 211 or AMS 361 or MAT 303

    SBC: STEM+

    An introduction to graph theory and combinatorial analysis. The emphasis is on solving applied problems rather than on theorems and proofs. Techniques used in problem solving include generating functions, recurrence relations, and network flows. This course develops the type of mathematical thinking that is fundamental to computer science and operations research.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16313730Linh NguyenOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 310: Survey of Probability and Stat

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 161 or MAT 132 or MAT 126 or MAT 142

    SBC: STEM+

    A survey of data analysis, probability theory, and statistics. Stem and leaf displays, box plots, schematic plots, fitting straight line relationships, discrete and continuous probability distributions, conditional distributions, binomial distribution, normal and t distributions, confidence intervals, and significance tests. May not be taken for credit in addition to ECO 320. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16310430Meichen SongOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 311: Probability Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: AMS 301 and 310 or permission of instructor Corequisites: MAT 203 or 205 or AMS 261

    Probability spaces, random variables, moment generating functions, algebra of expectations, conditional and marginal distributions, multivariate distributions, order statistics, law of large numbers.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26493430Fred RispoliOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 315: Data Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 310

    SBC: CER; ESI

    A continuation of AMS 310 that covers two sample t-tests, contingency table methods, the one-way analysis of variance, and regression analysis with one and multiple independent variables. Student projects analyze data provided by the instructor and require the use of a statistical computing package such as SAS or SPSS. An introduction to ethical and professional standards of conduct for statisticians will be provided.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26492230Yizhou LiOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 318: Financial Mathematics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 310

    SBC: WRTD

    This course will focus on accumulation functions, yield rates, annuities, loan repayment, term structure of interest rates/spot rates/forward rates, options, duration/convexity. This course follows the syllabus for the Financial Mathematics (FM) Exam of the Society of Actuaries and prepares students to pass the FM Exam.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26448130TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26448130Bakhtavar HagedornOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 325: Comp & Prog Fundamental in AMS

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 210 or MAT 211; AMS major

    Introduction to programming in MATLAB and Python, including scripting, basic data structures, algorithms, scientific computing, and software engineering. Homework projects will focus on using computation to solve linear algebra, data analysis, and other mathematical problems.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16572501Jacob JonesOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 326: Numerical Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: CSE 101; AMS 161; basic skills in using a high-level programming language (C, C++, or Java). Advisory prerequisite: AMS 210

    Direct and indirect methods for the solution of linear and nonlinear equations. Computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. Quadrature, differentiation, and curve fitting. Numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320230Yicong ZhuOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 335: Game Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: MAT 126 or 131 or 141 or AMS 151; C or higher in ECO 303

    SBC: SBS+

    Introduction to game theory fundamentals with special emphasis on problems from economics and political science. Topics include strategic games and Nash equilibrium, games in coalitional form and the core, bargaining theory, measuring power in voting systems, problems of fair division, and optimal and stable matching. This course is offered as both AMS 335 and ECO 355.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319330Marc Claveria MayolOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as AMS 335 and ECO 355

  • AMS 341: Op Rsrch I: Determinist Models

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: AMS 210 or MAT 211 or MAT 307 and MAT 308

    SBC: SBS+

    Linear programming with a view toward its uses in economics and systems analysis. Linear algebra and geometric foundations of linear programming; simplex method and its variations; primal dual programs; formulation and interpretation of linear programming models, including practical problems in transportation and production control. Optional computer projects. AMS 341 and 342 may be taken in either order, though it is recommended that AMS 341 be taken first.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16314130Xinran ZhengOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 351: Applied Algebra

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 210 or MAT 211 Advisory Prerequisite: MAT 200 or CSE 250 or equivalent

    Topics in algebra: groups, informal set theory, relations, homomorphisms. Applications: error correcting codes, Burnside's theorem, computational complexity, Chinese remainder theorem. This course is offered as both AMS 351 and MAT 312.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26476030Srijan GhoshOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as AMS 351 and MAT 312. Synchronous Online

  • AMS 361: Applied Calculus IV: Diff Equ

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 161 or MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or MPE level 9

    SBC: STEM+

    Homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear differential equations; systems of linear differential equations; solution with power series and Laplace transforms; partial differential equations and Fourier series. May not be taken for credit in addition to the equivalent MAT 303.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26492130Nilesh ChaturvediOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:00-01:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 394: Statistical Laboratory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 310 or AMS 315

    SBC: CER; ESI; EXP+

    Designed for students interested in statistics and their applications. Basic statistical techniques including sampling, design, regression, and analysis of variance are introduced. Includes the use of statistical packages such as SAS and R. Students translate realistic research problems into a statistical context and perform the analysis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163196L30Weihao WangOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • AMS 412: Mathematical Statistics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 311

    SBC: CER; ESI; EXP+

    Estimation, confidence intervals, Neyman Pearson lemma, likelihood ratio test, hypothesis testing, chi square test, regression, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320330Can HuangOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • AMS 542: Analysis of Algorithms

    Graduate 3 credits

    Techniques for designing efficient algorithms, including choice of data structures, recursion, branch and bound, divide and conquer, and dynamic programming. Complexity analysis of searching, sorting, matrix multiplication, and graph algorithms. Standard NP-complete problems and polynomial transformation techniques. This course is offered as both AMS 542 and CSE 548.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6599030Rezaul ChowdhuryOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-08:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANP 202: People and Pups

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one ANT/ANP/EBH/BIO course at the 100-level or higher with grade of C or better

    SBC: STAS

    An introduction to the growing literature on dog evolution, behavior, and cognition to understand why dogs are so well adapted to socializing with humans and what role they play in our societies. This course provides students with a foundation in animal behavior, specifically dog behavior and human-canine relationships. Key questions will include: How do dogs communicate with each other and with us? Are dogs smarter than you think? And what is unique about the bond between people and their pups?

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26341530Ann MarkhamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANP 250: Forensic Anthropology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory Prerequisite: ANP 120

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    This is an introductory survey course to the field of forensic anthropology. Topics that focus on the medicolegal significance of the recovery and analysis of human remains will be covered. Postmortem taphonomic processes that can affect a body, and determination of time since death will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to the determination of personal identity, such as sex, age and stature, from skeletal remains, and the analysis of skeletal trauma and cause of death. Contemporary issues such as mass disasters and human rights issues will be covered.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26562830Sarah MincerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANP 307: Ecosystems in Madagascar

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/Study Abroad office

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    The major goal of this course is to introduce the biodiversity and diversity of ecosystems on the island of Madagascar. In addition to exploring the different habitats within Ranomafana National Park, we will embark on a ten-day trip across Madagascar.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16592901Patricia WrightIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - MADAGASCAR

  • ANP 350: Methods in Studying Primates

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/Study Abroad office

    Introduction to the concepts and practical skills needed to conduct scientific work, particularly in the study of primates, including how to collect and analyze data focusing on habitat description, primate densities, use of space, and social interactions. Topics include design and presentation of research; ecological field methods; behavioral observations and other techniques. Students are required to plan a small research study and to present their proposal in class. Some computer work outside class required.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16593001Patricia WrightIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - MADAGASCAR

  • ANP 387: Indep prj Madagascar biodiv

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: appropriate interest in subject matter and background in ecology and conservation

    Allows students to apply the knowledge and research methods they have acquired in preceding courses during the study abroad experience (including: ANP 351 Biodiversity in Field Methods; ANP 307 Comparing Ecosystems in Madagascar; and ANP 326 Lemurs of Madagascar (3 Credits Each)). Students will design their own research project, and carry it through from hypothesis generating, data collection, statistical analyses and written and oral presentation of results. This project will allow students to showcase both their interests and academic skillsets. This course includes research on biodiversity. Some subjects could include impacts of human disturbance on biodiversity, species and abundance of frogs in large streams vs small streams, infant development and play in lemur groups with single infant vs lemur groups with two or three infants.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16593101Patricia WrightIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - MADAGASCAR

  • ANT 203: Native Americans

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory Prerequisite: ANT 102

    DEC: J SBC: DIV; GLO

    The various peoples and cultures of North America are studied with respect to their political, educational, linguistic, social, and cultural patterns. Selected societies are studied in depth.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16369030Madeline CherneyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANT 208: Zombiology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Zombie memes have become very popular in culture and media over the past several years. Many aspects of modern zombie lore, as represented in books, movies, and television programs such as The Walking Dead, are germane to understanding important issues in current affairs, science, and other topics of anthropological interest. In this class, we will use scenes from zombie media as prisms through which to examine topics such as the spread of infectious disease in our globalized and densely populated world, predation on humans, forensic analysis of trace evidence like tooth and cut marks, the collapse of civilizations, human behavior in small band societies, violent conflict, etc.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16337630Jason LewisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANT 210: Sunken Cities and Pirates

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS

    Explores the variety of underwater archaeological sites found around the world, including submerged Stone Age sites in the Old and New Worlds and sunken cities such as Alexandria, Egypt and Port Royal, Jamaica. The class also treats the development of global seafaring through the study of sunken ships, starting with the Bronze Age in the Mediterranean Sea through Viking age ships in northern Europe and the later Age of Exploration. Methods of underwater excavation and site interpretation based on anthropological theory will also be discussed.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26584730Jason LewisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANT 260: How We Eat

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: SBS; USA

    This course explores how people's food habits are shaped not only by their biological needs, but also by the economic, political, ecological, and social worlds in which they live. The breadth of anthropology (biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and archaeology) is brought to bear on issues including the economic and political underpinnings of American as well as other food cultures; the relationship between food habits and health (both over-and under-eating); the environmental impacts of various methods of food production; the relationship between food and social status; gendered food production as well as food consumption; food's role in religion; ethical eating; the limits of current knowledge (e.g., changing dietary recommendations); and the socioeconomic pressures that keep individuals eating according to cultural norms. The class discusses foodways in a variety of present and past cultures, but the emphasis is on modern American food culture and the cultural, economic, ecological, and political realities that shape it. Students will explore how these realities affect their own lives and eating habits.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16563330Anastasia IorgaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ANT 311: Immersion in Another Culture

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ANT 102

    DEC: J SBC: DIV; SBS+

    A specific world area, such as the highlands of New Guinea or the Nilotic Southern Sudan, or a particularly well-documented people such as the Trobriand Islanders, are considered in detail. Lectures, texts, and films consider ecology, history, social change, language, cultural systems, and social arrangements toward providing students with a comprehensive understanding of another cultural system. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16592701Tanzanian Culture Kamazima LwizaIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad Students only - TANZANIA

  • ANT 321: Archaeological Field Methods

    Undergraduate 3-6 credits

    Prerequisites: ANT 104; permission of instructor

    SBC: SBS+

    An opportunity to participate in all aspects of an archaeological research project. Students are trained in excavation, recording, artifact retrieval, surveying, field sorting techniques, and interpretation. This course is usually held in the summer and involves excavation of a prehistoric or early historic site.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265926L01Jason LewisIn PersonAppointmentTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - FRANCE

  • ANT 367: Male and Female

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: ESI; SBS+

    A study of the manifestation of sex roles in different cultures. Discussion topics include the impact of social, economic and political organization on gender roles and relationships, sexual orientation in cross-cultural perspective, and contemporary theories of gender inequality. Readings present both the male and female viewpoints.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26337230Madeline CherneyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • ANT 387: Indep Prjct Madagascar Culture

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: appropriate interest in subject matter and background in ecology and conservation

    Allows students to apply the knowledge and research methods they have acquired in preceding courses during the study abroad experience (including: ANP 351 Biodiversity in Field Methods; ANP 307 Comparing Ecosystems in Madagascar; and ANP 326 Lemurs of Madagascar-3 credits each). Students will design their own research project, and carry it through from hypothesis generating, data collection, statistical analyses and written and oral presentation of results. This project will allow students to showcase both their interests and academic skillsets. The subject of this research will be based in human communities. Most research will be questionnaire-based. Some projects will include data collection. Subjects can include medicinal plants, cultural use of forest resources, taboos, and gender roles to name a few.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16593201Patricia WrightIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad Students only - MADAGASCAR

  • ANT 527: Field Meth and Tech in Archaeo

    Graduate 3-9 credits

    An opportunity to participate in all aspects of an archaeological research project. Students develop practical skills in excavation, and design and execute plans for recording, artifact retrieval, surveying, field sorting techniques, and interpretation. This course involves faculty-led excavation of a prehistoric or early historic site. This course is offered as both ANT 527 and DPA 527. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265988L02Jason LewisIn PersonAppointmentTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - FRANCE

  • ARB 101: Intensive Elementary Arabic

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An intensive course covering the elementary Arabic program (ARB 111, ARB 112) in one semester. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16271501Anne-Marie PoulosIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-01:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARB 201: Intensive Intermediate Arabic

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    Prerequisite: ARB 101 or ARB 112 or placement into ARB 201 or ARB 211

    SBC: GLO; HUM; LANG

    An intensive course covering the intermediate Arabic language courses (ARB 211, 212) in one semester. May not be taken for credit in addition to ARB 211, 212.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16568830TBAOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-01:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 107: Art & Medicine

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the intersections of visual art and medicine from antiquity to today. The course develops skills in observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection through the study of the medical body in visual art and the role of art in health care. Topics of study include anatomical imagery, medical illustration, dissection and display of human remains, gender and women's health, the representation of medicine as a profession, art activism, and art therapy.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16340701Elise ArmaniOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 26531902Elise ArmaniOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 203: Arts of Asia

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: ARTS; GLO

    A general course on Far Eastern art covering India, China, and Japan from its beginnings to the present. Emphasis is on the major arts of painting and sculpture, with some reference to architecture.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16574031Amy KahngOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26443830Katherine RuckleOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 205: Introduction to Architecture

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the discipline of architecture through various interpretations of its technological and cultural functions. Focusing on the history of architecture's engagement with engineering, anthropology, sociology, and politics, this course explores changing conceptions of the nature and the task of architecture.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26574131Lauren FultonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 206: Modern Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the history of modern art, beginning with French Rococo and concluding with themes and concerns of a globally interconnected art world. Particular attention will be given to the rise of Modernism in Europe, the role of artists and artistic movements in social and political change, and the relationship of contemporary artistic practice to technology, social media and visual culture.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16340631Lauren FultonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26437630Amy KahngOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 207: Digital Media: History/Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS; TECH

    An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16259330Sarah MyersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 26437731Corinna KirschOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 26601732Sarah MyersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 209: Arts of the United States

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: ARTS; USA

    An introduction to the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the late colonial period to World War II. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding art's changing forms and meanings and its relationship to crucial themes and developments in American history: the impact of national expansion, for example, and of immigration, urbanization, and modernization more generally. The course will also focus on the varied images of American society created by artists of diverse class, racial, and ethnic backgrounds.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16268830Alireza SahafzadehOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26519731Alireza SahafzadehOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARH 308: Writing About Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ARH or ARS major/minor or permission of instructor

    SBC: WRTD

    An advanced topics course with a focus on research, analytical skills and writing about art. Students analyze essays by different artists, scholars, and critics about a central topic before selecting and developing their own related topic to research. The final project is a research paper that begins with a thesis statement and outline, includes several drafts, peer review, and a final product. This course is offered as both ARH 308 and ARS 308.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16251430Corinna KirschOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ARH 308 meets with ARS 308

    Session 26428631Daniel MenzoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ARH 308 meets with ARS 308

  • ARH 391: Topics in Global Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course

    DEC: G SBC: GLO; HFA+

    An in-depth exploration of a particular theme, movement or approach to transcultural artistic forms and practices. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26573901VIolence In Art/History Jinyoung JinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • ARS 105: The Creative Process

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the creative process in art making and conceptual tools for understanding the visual arts from the perspective of the artist. Students learn about various methods, terms and approaches of the creative process through demonstrations, lectures and discussions on related themes. By placing art in context of today's issues, this course enables students to gain insight into the significance of creativity in its many physical and intellectual manifestations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16270530Emma JonesOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: online

    Session 26536630Izumi AshizawaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 154: Foundations: Drawing

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    Fundamentals of drawing with a focus on developing technical and perceptual skills in hand-eye coordination and the ability to draw from observation using a variety of media. Conceptual and expressive possibilities of drawing explored within a range of subject matter that includes still life, the figure, landscape, and the study of the drawings of major artists, past and present.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 162498L01Daniel DonatoIn PersonMon. & Weds.09:30-01:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Online

    Session 265746L02Lauren RuizIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:30-05:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 205: Foundations: Idea and Form

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An exploration of the basic building blocks of artistic practice and aesthetic analysis. Projects, readings, presentations, and discussions are used to examine the impact cultural, environmental and social context have on meaning and perception in art and visual culture. Projects are organized around themes such as line, plane, volume, color, composition, pattern, scale, narrative, performance, light and time. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265745L30Sarah AllamIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-01:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 225: Introduction to Digital Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory Prerequisite: ARS 205

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS; TECH

    A hands-on introduction to the use of computers in the fine arts. Students explore image creation/manipulation, digital publishing and moving image through lecture, lab and discussion. Emphasis is on the expressive potential of the technology. No prior computer experience is required. Study of the history and impact of digital media on the arts and contemporary culture contextualize practical assignments. This course serves as preparation for further study in electronic media. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338030Diana ZhuOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 163379L30Diana ZhuOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 16588832Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 165890L32Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26368131Qin HanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 263682L31Qin HanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26588933Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265891L33Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 255: Introductory Painting

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ARS 154

    Introductory painting in oils or acrylics. The various media, tools, and techniques of painting and of preparing surfaces for painting are explored. Continues the work of ARS 154 in the traditional areas of landscape, still life, and figure, as well as in perspective, foreshortening, proportion, anatomy, and color theory. One or two field trips to New York City museums and galleries may be required.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165210L01Jason ParadisIn PersonMon. & Weds.12:30-04:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 281: Introductory Photography

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS; TECH

    An introduction to the creative techniques and visual grammar of contemporary photographic image production. This course presents core camera operations, lens-based techniques, and software applications used in digital image processing and output. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Estimated cost of supplies is $450, in addition to the course fee.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 162592L30Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 264440L31Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 308: Writing About Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ARH or ARS major/minor or permission of instructor

    SBC: WRTD

    An advanced topics course with a focus on research, analytical skills and writing about art. Students analyze essays by different artists, scholars, and critics about a central topic before selecting and developing their own related topic to research. The final project is a research paper that begins with a thesis statement and outline, includes several drafts, peer review, and a final product. This course is offered as both ARH 308 and ARS 308.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16256530Corinna KirschOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ARS 308 and ARH 308

    Session 26424431Daniel MenzoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ARS 308 and ARH 308

  • ARS 325: Digital Arts: Print

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ARS 225 or ARS 281 or CDT 208

    SBC: HFA+

    An exploration of the practical, aesthetic, social, political, and ethical issues at stake in digital imaging. Students use contemporary compositing techniques as well as 2 and 3D printing to create digital art, including digital prints, artist's books, and data visualization. Hybrid digital and analog image making techniques are also explored. An introduction to the practice and theory of constructed digital art and design through lecture, labs, readings and art production. Students use contemporary compositing, page layout and design techniques to create image centered works of art, including digital prints, artist's books, data based visualization, and installations. Hybrid combinations of digital and analog image making techniques are also explored. Study of the history and impact of digital print media on the arts and contemporary culture contextualize practical assignments. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26574902Qin HanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265750L02Qin HanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 327: Digital Arts:WebDesign&Culture

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: CDT 208 or ARS 225

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An exploration of the practice and history of art on the Internet through lecture, project production, discussion and critique. Students create content for the web and mobile platforms while examining historical, and theoretical issues related to art and design on the Internet. Images, text, sound, and code are used to create web-based artworks and informational sites in response to course content. Emphasis is on creative use of current web technologies and software, as well as an examination of the cultural implications of the web. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338330Carter JohnsonOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 163384L30Carter JohnsonOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.12:31-01:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 16601531Carter JohnsonOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 166016L31Carter JohnsonOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.12:31-01:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 355: Anatomical/Bio Illustration

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    This course is intended to develop skills and approaches to design, scientific visualization and illustration not specific to any particular academic background or intended career path. It encourages the development of analytical observational skills and better brain/eye/hand coordination, providing an opportunity to explore the specialist rendering techniques used in scientific illustration. It is open to students with either a science or art background. It includes a historical overview of medical, biological, archaeological, botanical, technical, geological, paleontological, and anatomical illustration, but the focus is on student projects. Grading is on an individual basis, rather than against absolute standards, and students are expected to show that their skills have improved during the course by providing evidence of their work in the form of sketchbooks, preparatory studies as well as more finished pieces. This course is offered as both HBA 325 and ARS 355. Summer, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26445430Stephen NashIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ARS 355 and HBA 325 Synchronous and asynchronous online meetings

  • ARS 381: Color and Light Photography

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ARS 281

    SBC: HFA+

    An exploration of the creative aspects of color and light relationships with natural and artificial lighting. This course presents digital imaging techniques, critical color output, and use of the lighting studio. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Estimated cost of supplies is $300 in addition to the course fee.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16574202Andreas RentschIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-10:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 165743L02Andreas RentschIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:35-01:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 390: Topics in Studio Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ARS 154 or ARS 205

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    May be repeated as the topic changes. Not for major credit.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16582701Book Projects In Photography Andreas RentschIn PersonMon. & Weds.09:30-10:50AMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 165828L01Book Projects In Photography Andreas RentschIn PersonMon. & Weds.10:50-01:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ARS 491: Topics in Studio Theory & Prac

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Permission of department

    May be repeated as the topic changes. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165705L01Mixed Media Adv Std Jason ParadisIn PersonMon. & Weds.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ARS 491 meets with ARS 520

  • ARS 520: Projects for M.F.A. Candidates

    Graduate 1-9 credits

    Prerequisite: enrollment in the M. F. A. program or permission of instructor

    Advanced projects in areas that may not be included in the M.F.A. curriculum, utilizing the unique talents of regular and visiting faculty, the facilities of the Art department, or other aspects of the university environment, and possibly facilities at other locations or institutions. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Prerequisites: Faculty sponsor, permission of graduate studies director. Fall, Spring and Summer,

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165829L01Mixed Media Jason ParadisIn PersonMon. & Weds.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ARS 491 meets with ARS 520

  • ATM 103: Extreme Weather

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Provides a working knowledge of the causes of extreme weather around the world, how these extremes have changed over time, how technology has aided in preparedness, advancements in forecasting, human impacts of weather, and the vulnerability and adaptability of societies. Throughout the course, recent extreme events from around the world will be analyzed as case studies to explore the complex interaction of weather, technology and society. These examples will span the globe and will include, but not be limited to: hurricanes (e.g., Hurricane Sandy); air pollution (also termed 'chemical weather') in Beijing and Mexico City; extreme heat waves in western Europe; monsoonal flooding in Southeast Asia; and drought in Central and East Africa.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26507730Kevin ReedOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BIO 114: Dinosaur Paleontology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory prerequisite: Entry level biology

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    A study of paleontology that includes evolution of dinosaurs, their classification system, a study of the important dinosaur families, dinosaur behavior, ecology, current controversies, hot topics and the KT extinction. Dinosaur paleontology will also cover the excavation of dinosaurs and the colorful history of the 'dinosaur hunters.' This course will emphasize the science and research involved in studying dinosaurs. Using dinosaurs as a vehicle, students will be exposed to the scientific method of inquiry and will leave this course with a better understanding on how to evaluate science in the real world. Not for Biology major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26437301Stuart PlotkinIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • BIO 202: Molecular & Cellular Biology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CHE 129 or CHE 131 or Corequisite CHE 152

    DEC: E SBC: STEM+

    The fundamentals of cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics. The biochemical and molecular bases of cell structure, energy metabolism, gene regulation, heredity, and development in living organisms from bacteria to man are discussed. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6181730Vitaly CitovskyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: ONLINE asynchronous course. Except for synchronous evening exams on 6/08, 6/22, 7/13; MUST HAVE internet, computer, webcam, microphone. SEE http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/biology-online/

  • BIO 203: Cellular and Organ Physiology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CHE 129 or CHE 131 or Corequisite CHE 152 Pre- or Corequisite: MAT 125 or higher or AMS 151

    DEC: E SBC: STEM+

    The fundamentals of cell and organ physiology in mammalian and non-mammalian organisms. The structure and function of cell membranes and the physiology of cell to cell signaling, cellular respiration, and homeostasis of organs and organisms are examined with an emphasis on the comparative physiology of vertebrates and invertebrates. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16218930Robert WatsonOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Thurs.09:30-11:45AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online If you need permission to register, contact Lynette Giordano at Bio_Registration@stonybrook.edu

  • BIO 204: Intro Biology Lab I

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CHE 129, CHE 131, or Corequisite: CHE 152 Pre- or Corequisite: BIO 201 or BIO 202 or BIO 203

    First course in the foundational laboratory sequence for all biology students, and students in related fields. Students will experience the laboratory process, research process, a wide range of laboratory tools, methods, skills, learn to read and write scientific presentations, and collaborate in formal inquiry. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. This course includes assignments that can be used to satisfy the SBC objective SPK if co-registered for BIO 458.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163552R01Deborah SpikesIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-09:53AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163540L01TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163541L02TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163542L03TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163543L04TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163544L05TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163553R02Marvin O'NealIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:30-02:23PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163545L06TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163546L07TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163547L08TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163548L09TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022:Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 163549L10TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on June 30th between 7:30-9:30pm

  • BIO 205: Intro Biology Lab IIA

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in BIO 204 Pre- or Corequisite: BIO 201 or BIO 202 or BIO 203

    Second course in the foundational laboratory sequence for all biology students, and students in related fields. Students will experience the laboratory process, research process, a wide range of laboratory tools, methods, skills, learn to read and write scientific presentations, and collaborate in formal inquiry. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Not for credit in addition to BIO 207. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265804R01Rebecca GarciaIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-09:53AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265798L01TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265799L02TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265800L03TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:00-12:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265805R02Rebecca GarciaIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:30-02:23PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265801L04TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265802L05TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

    Session 265803L06TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:30-05:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: 2022: Required in-person Final Exam on August 16th between 7:30-9:30pm

  • BIO 231: Cannabis-Hist, Cult, Sci, Med

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory prerequisite: BIO 202

    SBC: STAS

    Provide a sound background in all aspects of cannabis, including the history of use worldwide, cannabis plant biology, the chemistry of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids, and the relationship to political, legal, and racism issues throughout history to the present. The purpose of this broad familiarization is to prepare students to contribute knowledgeably to the discussion and debate regarding the present and future uses of cannabis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26444530Matthew ElmesOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: ONLINE asynchronous course. Except for synchronous evening exams on 7/27, 8/10; MUST HAVE internet, computer, webcam, microphone. SEE http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/biology-online/

  • BIO 299: Advanced Microbiology/Health

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in BIO 202 and C or higher in BIO 204

    This course will include lectures, laboratory recitations, and laboratory sessions focused on fundamental clinical Microbiology techniques. The lectures will cover Bacteria, Viruses, Helminths, and medically important Protozoans. In the laboratory, students will learn basic and applied clinical microbiology methods, including microscopy; staining and quantitative analysis of bacteria; analysis of throat and urine cultures; and determination of sensitivity to various antimicrobial agents. Priority for this course will be given to allied health, pre-nursing, and pre-veterinary students. May not be used for credit towards either the Biology major or minor. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Formerly offered as BIO 266; not for credit in addition to BIO 266.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16359601Sangeet HoneyIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:00AMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 163597R01Sangeet HoneyIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:15-11:00AMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 163598L01Sangeet HoneyIn PersonTues. & Thurs.11:05-01:20PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • BIO 310: Cell Biology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIO 202; and C or higher in BIO 203; and CHE 321 or CHE 331 or CHE 341

    The cell is studied as the unit of structure, biochemical activity, genetic control, and differentiation. The principles of biochemistry and genetics are applied to an understanding of nutrition, growth, and development.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 2 Extended6559530Susan ErsterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: ONLINE asynchronous course. Except for synchronous evening exams on 7/5, 7/26, 8/09; MUST HAVE internet, computer, webcam, microphone. SEE http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/biology-online/

  • BIO 312: Bioinformatics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIO 202; and C or higher in BIO 204; and MAT 125 or higher or AMS 151 Advisory Pre- or Corequisite: AMS 110, or BIO 211

    SBC: ESI; TECH

    This course uses computational methods to analyze current problems and solutions in molecular biology research. Students are exposed to algorithms and tools available for both single gene and larger scale genome research. Emphasis is on practical application. Laboratories allow students to apply their knowledge to real life molecular biology problems. This course routinely offers an opportunity to satisfy the Stony Brook Curriculum WRTD and Upper Division Writing Requirements for the Biology and Biochemistry majors. Students who intend to use the writing assignment in this course to satisfy these requirements must register for BIO 459 when they register for BIO 312.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16591601Joshua RestOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-11:25AMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 165915L01Joshua RestOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.12:00-02:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 165917L02Joshua RestOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.12:00-02:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 165991L03Joshua RestOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.12:00-02:50PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • BIO 314: Cancer Biology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in BIO 202

    An examination of the biology of cancer. Emphasis is on molecular and cellular events, such as regulation of gene expression, genome maintenance, cell growth and death, differentiation, cell-cell recognition, signaling and homeostasis that are frequently disrupted in cancer. Recent advances in diagnosis and therapy will also be discussed.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 2 Extended6559630Susan ErsterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: ONLINE asynchronous course. Except for synchronous evening exams on 7/7, 7/21, 8/11; MUST HAVE internet, computer, webcam, microphone. SEE http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/biology-online/

  • BIO 315: Microbiology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIO 202 Advisory Pre- or Corequisite: BIO 201

    The organization, structure, energetics, and reproduction of microorganisms. Interactions of bacteria and viruses are discussed. This course does not include a laboratory component. Not for credit in addition to HBM 320. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16219030Sangeet HoneyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: If you need permission to register, contact Lynette Giordano at Bio_Registration@stonybrook.edu

  • BIO 316: Molecular Immunology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIO 202 and C or higher in BIO 203 Pre- or corequisite: CHE 322 or CHE 326 or CHE 332

    Structure, function, and organization of the immune response at the molecular and cellular levels. Molecular mechanisms of immunological responses to microorganisms and various disease states are explored.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16240330Janet AndersenOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as BIO 316 and CEB 554. Synchronous Online If you need permission to register, contact Lynette Giordano at Bio_Registration@stonybrook.edu

  • BIO 320: General Genetics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in BIO 202; and C or higher in MAT 125, or completion of MAT 126 or higher , or MPE score of 6+

    Integrates classical and molecular approaches to the transmission and expression of biological information. Topics include: Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance; linkage analysis; population genetics; DNA replication, mutation and recombination; gene expression and its regulation; current genetic technology; developmental and cancer genetics, quantitative and complex traits, and relevant ethical issues. Cannot be taken for major credit with BIO 321 (applies to Biology majors Only). This course routinely offers an opportunity to satisfy the Stony Brook Curriculum WRTD and Upper Division Writing Requirements for the Biology and Biochemistry majors. Students who intend to use the writing assignment in this course to satisfy these requirements must register for BIO 459 when they register for BIO 320.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6181330Stefan TafrovOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: If you need permission to register, contact Lynette Giordano at Bio_Registration@stonybrook.edu

  • BIO 334: Principles of Neurobiology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in BIO 203

    The ionic basis of nerve potentials, the physiology of synapses, sense organs and effectors, and the integrative action of the nervous system are discussed.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26369501Robert WatsonIn PersonMon. & Weds.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as BIO 334 & NEU 534

  • BIO 354: Evolution

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIO 201 and C or higher in BIO 202 Advisory pre- or corequisite: BIO 320 or 321

    A detailed discussion of the mechanisms of evolution, focusing on the ways in which genetic changes in populations lead to adaptation, speciation, and historical patterns of evolutionary change. This course routinely offers an opportunity to satisfy the Stony Brook Curriculum WRTD and Upper Division Writing Requirements for the Biology and Biochemistry majors. Students who intend to use the writing assignment in this course to satisfy these requirements must register for BIO 459 when they register for BIO 354.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16590530TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Exam Information to be posted on Blackboard. If you need permission to register, contact Lynette Giordano at Bio_Registration@stonybrook.edu

  • BIO 358: Bio & Human Soc & Sex Behavior

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; and one of the following: ANP 101, BIO 115, BIO 201, BIO 202, or B IO 203

    DEC: H SBC: ESI; STAS

    Major features of human social and sexual behavior are examined from a biological perspective. Insights from ethology, evolutionary biology, and neurobiology are synthesized into a picture of human nature and behavior. Implications of this picture for human sexual and social behavior are considered. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6181430Paul BinghamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: ONLINE asynchronous course. Except for synchronous evening exams on 6/09, 6/30, 7/12; MUST HAVE internet, computer, webcam, microphone. SEE http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/biology-online/

  • BIO 361: Biochemistry I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in BIO 202 and C or higher in CHE 322 or 332 or 326

    First course of an advanced two-semester study of the major chemical constituents of the cell, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Emphasis is on enzyme structure, enzyme kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and metabolic pathways.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6182230Michael LakeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: ONLINE asynchronous course. Except for synchronous evening exams on 6/7, 6/28, 7/14; MUST HAVE internet, computer, webcam, microphone. SEE http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/biology-online/

  • BIO 511: Topics Biotechnology

    Graduate 3 credits

    MAT Biology or MALS Program

    DEC: NSLS

    An introduction to the field of biotechnology. The course will survey the history of the development of genetic engineering, methodologies used in biotechnology, applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture and manufacturing, and the implications of these technologies for society. Intended for the students in the MAT Science and MALS programs. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/course fees for more information. Offered Spring, 3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165658L01Kristen VadaszIn PersonMon. & Weds.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as BIO 511 and CEB 546

  • BIO 558: Biological Basis of Human Evol

    Graduate 3 credits

    A exploration of biological theories of human evolution, properties, and behavior. We build an understanding of evolution of complex organisms by natural selection, followed by the emergence of humans as a uniquiely complex species. Scientific hypothesis formation and testing using the extensive multidisciplinary empirical record of the 1.8 million years of human history is developed throughout. Implications of human evolutionary biology for contemporary social and sexual behavior are also investigated. This course is co-scheduled with BIO 558. Fall, Spring, and Summer

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65478S30Joanne SouzaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as BIO 558 and CEB 553

  • BME 100: Intro Biomed Engineering

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: BME major or BNG minor or departmental consent

    SBC: TECH

    A rigorous introduction to biomedical engineering that provides the historical and social context of BME though contemporary emerging areas within BME. Specific areas covered in depth include: bioelectricity and biosensors (action potentials to signal processing), bioimaging (invasive and non-invasive), genetic engineering (with ethical discussions), and biostatistics. Hands-on computational modeling introduces the physiological concept of positive and negative feedback loops in the body. Emphasis is placed on ways engineers view the living system by using design based approaches and computation.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26498430Mei Lin ChanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BME 205: Clinical Chal 21st Cent

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SNW; TECH

    Technology used by current medical practice, focusing on weekly topics associated with a specific disease state. Technology used to diagnose and treat these disease states will be rigorously examined. Weekly topics will include: cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and organ transplant. Key disease states will be presented in physiological and cellular depth. This course may not be taken for major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26497930Mei Lin ChanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BME 303: Biomechanics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BME 260 or MEC 260 Pre- or Corequisite: BIO 202

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Illuminates the principles of mechanics and dynamics that apply to living organisms, from cells to humans to Sequoia trees. The behavior of organisms is examined to observe how they are constrained by the physical properties of biological materials. Locomotion strategies (or the lack thereof) are investigated for the forces and range of motions required and energy expenditures. Includes the relationship between form and function to illustrate how form dominates behavior. Presents the physiological effects of mechanical stresses on organs, pathologies that develop from abnormal stress, and how biological growth and adaptation arise as a natural response to the mechanics of living.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26601030Chaudhry HassanOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BME 313: Bioinstrumentation

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BME 212 Pre- or Corequisite: BME 271 or ESE 271

    Basic concepts of biomedical instrumentation and medical devices with a focus on the virtual instrumentation in biomedical engineering using the latest computer technology. Topics include basic sensors in biomedical engineering, biological signal measurement, conditioning, digitizing, and analysis. Advanced applications of LabVIEW, a graphics programming tool for virtual instrumentation. Helps students develop skills to build virtual instrumentation for laboratory research and prototyping medical devices. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16603101Wei LinOnline SynchronousTuesday09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 166032L01Wei LinOnline SynchronousThursday09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 115: Introduction to Business

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    The course provides a general framework for students to develop an understanding of how businesses work, how they are managed, and how different business models are applied to existing businesses in today's fast paced business environment. Introduces students to major business topics to form a foundation for understanding the general functional areas of business, the environment businesses operate in, and general principles of management and leadership. The course materials and coverage provides the fundamentals necessary for Business majors and minors understanding of more advanced business topics encountered in upper division Business courses while introducing students from other majors to the importance of business in the development of ideas into products and services and their distribution to customers through markets.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26516830Richard LaskowskiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 215: Intro to Business Statistics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS Maj/Min, CME Maj, or ISE Maj; and MAT 122 or higher.

    The application of current statistical methods to problems in the modern business environment. Topics include probability, random variables, sampling techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression. Students analyze real data sets using standard statistical software, interpret the output, and write extensively about the results.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16336730Michael HigueraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • BUS 220: Intro to Decision Sciences

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS Maj/Min, MTD, ECO, ISE, or CME major; BUS 215; MAT 122 or higher

    SBC: STEM+

    Familiarizes students with a variety of quantitative methods applicable in managing both the service and manufacturing sectors. Basic concepts of quantitative modeling are applied and tested in various examples supporting decision making in business settings. Topics include: optimization via linear, integer, and goal programming; simulation; decision and break-even analysis; and forecasting. (Formerly Management Science)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16334730Michael HigueraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Students are required to log onto Blackboard http://blackboard.stonybrook.edu/

    Session 26515732Michael HigueraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Students are required to log onto Blackboard http://blackboard.stonybrook.edu/

  • BUS 301: Business Communications

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite(s): BUS major; WRT 102; and U3 or U4 standing

    SBC: SPK; WRTD

    The purpose of BUS 301 - Business Communications is to provide Stony Brook College of Business undergraduates with a conceptual framework and specific tools for communicating in complex environments and accomplishing strategic academic and professional business goals. This core course provides, writing, oral and collaborative skills necessary for future business courses, internships, and professional positions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26516630Diane ImpagliazzoOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • BUS 317: Estate & Financial Planning

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS major

    The Retirement, Estate, and Financial Planning course is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in Insurance, financial planning and asset management. This course will also be highly beneficial for those wishing to learn how to manage their own financial affairs and how to make wise financial decisions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26572330Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 326: Organizational Behavior

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS maj/min.

    As members of many types of organizations throughout our lives, we are all affected at some time or another by their internal dynamics. These dynamics consist of the behaviors of individuals and students as they work and interact together within the organization. To help us best understand and address these issues, the field of organizational behavior has developed as the study of the behavior of individuals and students in organizations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16335030Amy MilliganOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • BUS 330: Principles of Finance

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS major/minor, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major. Advisory Prerequisite: ECO 108

    The goal of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and tools in finance. Upon completion of the course students should understand the role of a financial manager, be able to develop and analyze financial statements of a corporation, recognize the corporation's main sources and uses of funds, and develop understanding of the corporation's capital budgeting process.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16334130Thomas TallericoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 336: Mergers & Acquisitions

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: BUS 330; Business Major or or Entrepreneurship Minor

    Corporate mergers and acquisitions continue to play a significant role in many companies' value and growth strategies. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to mergers and acquisitions (M&A) from the perspective of corporate finance. The primary objective of the curse is for each student to gain a well-rounded understanding of the major strategic, economic, financial, and governance issues of mergers and acquisitions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16571530Gokhan TornaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 340: Information Systms in Managmnt

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS Major/Minor, ISE Major, or CME Major; U3 or U4 standing. Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348, BUS 215, and MAT 122

    SBC: TECH

    An introductory course in management information systems (MIS). Its objectives are to develop a basic understanding of the concepts and techniques needed in analyzing, designing, and managing these systems, and to explore the applications of computers and information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of individuals, groups, and organizations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16336430Christine PitoccoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 346: Operations Management

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: BUS Major/Minor or ISE Major: BUS 215 or AMS 102 for non-business majors, and BUS 220 .

    Analysis and design of service and manufacturing systems. Topics include quality management, product and service design, process selection and capacity planning, design of work systems, inventory management, aggregate planning, material requirements planning, scheduling, waiting line model, just-in-time systems, and supply chain management.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16335130Mohammad Delasay SorkhabOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26516530Mohammad Delasay SorkhabOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 348: Principles of Marketing

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS Major/Minor or ISE Major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration.

    Basic marketing concepts and their applications. Issues include strategy, market segmentation, individual consumer behavior, marketing research, promotion, pricing and international marketing. The emphasis is on analysis of the challenges facing business with respect to all relevant constituencies, including the company in general, managerial colleagues across functional areas, consumers, stockholders, and government. This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 349.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16329930Camille AbbruscatoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 353: Entrepreneurship

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Business majors, Business minors, Entreprenuership Minors or Engineering majors: U4 S tanding Co-requisite for engineering majors: Enrollment in relevant senior design course

    Entrepreneurship is the study of new venture creation and management and it could occur in a myriad of ways depending n the interactions of entrepreneurs and opportunities. This course provides an overview of issues of creating a business, ranging from opportunity recognition and evaluation to resource acquisitions and management. It is designed to appeal to individuals with strong desires to become entrepreneurs, to join start up companies, or to work in the venture capital industry. The course objectives are threefold: 1) to develop a scientific understanding of entrepreneurship, and the empirical evidence in support of theories; 2) to transform this scientific understanding to practice; and 3) to provide firsthand experience with dealing with uncertainty and managing the start-up process.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16334430Stefan DoeringOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Students must log on to blackboard every Tuesday and Thursday from 6:30pm-9:55pm.

  • BUS 355: Investment Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

    Investment Analysis helps students make informed investment decisions in their personal and professional lives by providing a solid foundation of practical applications to introduce the topics and techniques used by investors and money managers. Course topics include: the investment environment, securities markets and transactions, finding investment data and information, return and risk, modern portfolio concepts, common stocks, analyzing common stocks, stock valuation, market efficiency and behavioral finance, fixed-income securities, mutual funds and exchange-traded funds.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16330030Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • BUS 356: Financial Analysis with Excel

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

    The course focuses on issues in finance and investing, computational techniques related to corporate finance and investment decisions will be the core of the course. Using excel this class will explore the financial mathematics of: foreign currency transactions, corporate valuation, capital budgeting, inventory valuation, profit margins, financial modeling, leveraged buyouts, and financial forecasting.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16335530Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 358: Marketing Research

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration; U3 or U4 standing; BUS 215 for BUS majors, one of the following for PSY majors: AMS 102, ECO 320, POL 201, PSY 201 or SOC 202. Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

    SBC: ESI

    Introduces marketing research tools that aid managers in marketing decision-making and how the marketing research process can be used to collect and analyze data and information to solve marketing problems. A strong applied orientation exposes students to marketing research in traditional areas such as market segmentation, product positioning, product design, brand perception, and sales forecasting, as well as emerging areas including customer satisfaction, customer relationship management (CRM), and on-line marketing.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16336530Denise BuhrauOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 359: Consumer Behavior

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: BUS major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration; U3 or U4 standing Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

    Examines the basic concepts underlying consumer behavior with the goal of understanding how these concepts can be applied in analyzing and solving marketing problems.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26517830Peter CaprarielloOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 365: Financial Management

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

    SBC: ESI

    Financial management techniques and analysis for improving business decision-making will be explored. Topics include: Long and short term financial decisions, debt and equity funding, capital structure, net working capital, inventory management, account receivable management, and how to deal with financial distress related to reorganization and/or liquidation in bankruptcy. The basics of payout policy will be discussed including dividends and stock repurchases. In addition, students will learn how companies finance merger and acquisition decisions, including leveraged buyouts.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26510830Thomas TallericoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 441: Business Strategy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS or ECO or MTD or CME Major; U4 standing

    Capstone course that builds on tools and concepts introduced in more specialized business courses and on students' general business knowledge. Includes: methods for analysis of forces driving competition; identification of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats faced by individual corporations; and practical strategies for enabling new or existing firms to compete successfully within an industry. Case studies and in-class situations challenge students to develop skills in handling multidimensional business problems.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26510930Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 447: Business Ethics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: BUS Major or ECO, ISE, or MTD Major; WRT 102; U4 standing.

    SBC: CER

    An introduction to traditional ethical theories and their application to business. A basis for understanding how ethical issues in business arise, and some strategies to control or resolve them, are derived from an examination of the work of philosophers and other writers relating to business ethics. Recent business case studies enable students to develop their own perspectives.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16334230Jennifer CarterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 16335231Jennifer CarterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • BUS 448: Marketing Strategy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: BUS Major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration and U4 Standing; Pre or Co-requisite BUS 358.

    A capstone course for students in the Marketing Specialization in which students apply a wide range of marketing principles to address problems different companies face in areas such as channel distribution, pricing, new product development, communication, promotions, strategic marketing alliances, positioning, and target marketing.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26516930Stacey FinkelsteinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CEA 567: History of Jazz

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHLS

    An exploration of the history of jazz music, both as a musical art and as a cultural phenomenon. Beginning with its roots in 19th century African-American musical practice through its present prominence throughout the world, the course will expose students to the broader cultural forces that led to the development, growth, and expansion of this music.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65491S30Steven GehringOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEB 546: Topics Biotechnology

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: NSLS

    An introduction to the field of biotechnology. The course will survey the history of the development of genetic engineering, methodologies used in biotechnology, applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture and manufacturing, and the implications of these technologies for society. Intended for the students in the MAT Science and MALS programs. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/course fees for more information. Offered Spring, 3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165687L01Kristen VadaszIn PersonMon. & Weds.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as BIO 511 and CEB 546

  • CEB 553: Biology & Human Behavior

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: NSSB

    A biological theory of human uniqueness is presented and explored through the examination of empirical evidence from a mulitidisciplinary prospective including insights from ethnology, human social and sexual behavior, evolutionary biology, history, economics, the humanities and political science.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65442S30Joanne SouzaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEB 554: Curnt Topic Imunolgy

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in either MAT biology (TBIMT) or MALS graduate programs (SPDMA).

    DEC: NSLS

    This is a comprehensive course in Immunology designed to be taught to secondary school teachers and it will address the new living environment curriculum standards for Immunology. The proposed course will combine lectures in Immunology with practical laboratory exercises. Laboratory activities will be provided that can be modified for secondary school education. Emphasis will be made on recent developments in Immunology and the essential role of the immune system in protection from infections and cancer. Concepts to be covered include how the immune system distinquishes self from non-self, how it handles various pathogens and why it sometimes fails.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16323930Janet AndersenOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CEB 554 and BIO 316 (graduate students will complete additional assignments).synchronous online

  • CED 595: Capstone Seminar

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-Requisite: Matriculation in MALS program; prior completion of 24 graduate level credits towards the degree.

    The goal of the Capstone Seminar is to teach students to understand and conduct graduate level research. Research may be either original or applied. Prior approval of topic by faculty required; methodology and resources will be reviewed throughout writing process. Effective Fall 2014, this course will be GRADED (A, B, C, F). Effective Summer 2015, successful completion of the Capstone Seminar requires a grade of "B" or better; otherwise, the course must be repeated in order to graduate. No transfer credit or substitutions. May not be used to meet 12 credit content requirement for professional teaching license (MA in Liberal Studies).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65441S30Jennifer YoungOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65717S31Laura KoplewitzOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEE 505: Education: Theory and Practice

    Graduate 3 credits

    Schools are fundamental institutions in every society. While they reflect the existing social order with all of its hierarchies and inequalities, they can also act as engines of social mobility, democratic opportunity, and social change. The purpose of the class is to help prospective teachers acquire the conceptual tools needed to analyze these processes in a sustained, in-depth manner in order to make informed judgments about their future goals as teaching professionals. Advisory Pre-requisite: Open to prospective (pre-service) teachers, and current teachers.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338630TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: SUMMER 2022 - synchronous and asynchronous online course requirements.

    Session 16338630Michael JannaceOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: SUMMER 2022 - synchronous and asynchronous online course requirements.

    Session 16352331TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: SUMMER 2022 - S.31 Reserved for SLP students. Synchronous and asynchronous online course requirements.

    Session 16352331Michael JannaceOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: SUMMER 2022 - S.31 Reserved for SLP students. Synchronous and asynchronous online course requirements.

  • CEE 509: Children's Literature

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHLS

    Students will trace the historical and psychological development of the concept of childhood by studying the canonical literature for children that shaped cultural ideas of childhood. Students will read a wide representation of classic and contemporary ¿children¿s¿ literature including fairy tales, fantasy, poetry, adventure stories, historical fiction, and picture books. The class focuses on the literary analysis of different genres in children¿s literature.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65492S30Elisa ScottOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEE 565: Human Development

    Graduate 3 credits

    An examination of the biological and psychological development of children and adolescents and its relationship to teaching and curriculum development for diverse learners. The course will focus on special education programs, childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders, and societal issues. Note: Preservice course for those not yet initially certified. Offered: Fall, Spring. 3 credits. Letter graded. Previously listed as PSY 595.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163241S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Online synchronous and asynchronous requirements.

    Session 163241S30Nicholas Ullrich IIIOnline Sync/Async CombinedTuesday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Online synchronous and asynchronous requirements.

  • CEE 594: Language Acquisition & Lit Dev

    Graduate 3 credits

    In-depth exploration of the theories of literacy and language development of native English speakers and students who are English language learners pre-school through grade 12. The development and assessment of literacy skills among children at various stages of learning development and across disciplines will be examined. Attention will also be given to children with special needs and the integration of technology in the development of literacy skills. 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 263692S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 344, LIN 544, and CEE 594 synchronous and asynchronous online course requirements

    Session 263692S30Grace WivellOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 344, LIN 544, and CEE 594 synchronous and asynchronous online course requirements

    Session 263693S31TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: SUMMER 2022 - Section 31 is reserved for students in the Speech Language Pathology program.

    Session 263693S31Grace WivellOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: SUMMER 2022 - Section 31 is reserved for students in the Speech Language Pathology program.

    SPD Online65499S32John MyersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEE 601: Early Adolescent Development

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course will address the unique social, emotional, physical and intellectual challenges faced by 10-14 year old children, known as the period of early adolescence. Critical understanding of these characteristics and transformations will be an essential part of the course, along with a review of the important work of Piaget, Erickson and others who have made significant contributions toward our understanding and ability to effectively teach this age group. The vital elements of parental involvement and responsiveness to diversity will also be emphasized. Teachers will be prepared to transition to the middle school classroom through deep appreciation for and understanding of the children they will teach in grades 5-8.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65444S30Peter PeceOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEE 602: Middle Child Educ:Instruction

    Graduate 3 credits

    Based on a four corner framework for quality teaching, this course examines how to set the climate, teach the content, facilitate the interactions and foster reflection in the middle school classroom. The course focuses on using brain based instruction as the basis for learning and processes for making data-driven instructional decisions and for designing curriculum to address the standards. In addition, emphasis is given to three critical instructional strategies: cooperative group instruction, a multiple intelligences approach and a higher order thinking skills. Woven throughout the course content is the concept of differentiating instruction and assessment of individual learners.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65445S30Joanne KroonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEF 501: Instr of For Lang Elementary

    Graduate 3 credits

    The focus of the course is applying theories of second language learning to instruction at the elementary school level, understanding of developmental issues for teaching young children, designing effective curriculum, and engaging in effective instructional practice and assessment appropriate for world languages at the elementary school level. This course enables certified secondary teachers of foreign languages, 7-12, to extend their certification to include the instruction of foreign languages at grades 1-6. It is open only to certified Foreign Language teachers and those currently matriculated in a Foreign Language teacher certification program.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265086S30Elaine MargaritaOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Online. Meets Synchronous: July 6, 7, 8, 11 (8:30 AM - 5:30 PM); July 12 (8:30 AM - 12:30 PM). Asynchronous for entire Summer Session II (D). Consult instructor for additional info.

    Session 265086S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedThursday08:30-05:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Online. Meets Synchronous: July 6, 7, 8, 11 (8:30 AM - 5:30 PM); July 12 (8:30 AM - 12:30 PM). Asynchronous for entire Summer Session II (D). Consult instructor for additional info.

    Session 265086S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedTuesday08:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Online. Meets Synchronous: July 6, 7, 8, 11 (8:30 AM - 5:30 PM); July 12 (8:30 AM - 12:30 PM). Asynchronous for entire Summer Session II (D). Consult instructor for additional info.

    Session 265086S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon., Weds., Fri.08:30-05:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Online. Meets Synchronous: July 6, 7, 8, 11 (8:30 AM - 5:30 PM); July 12 (8:30 AM - 12:30 PM). Asynchronous for entire Summer Session II (D). Consult instructor for additional info.

  • CEF 547: Prin/Prac Special Education

    Graduate 3 credits

    An overview of special education principles and practices that will include an understanding of the categories of disabilities; identification and remediation of disabilities; the special education process and state and federal special education laws and regulations; effective practices for planning and designing co-teaching and collaboration with peers; individualizing instruction; and applying positive behavioral supports and interventions to address student and classroom management needs. As of Fall 2011, this course meets the NYS special education requirement for all pre-service candidates for teacher certification.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65443S30Norma EgicOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65486S31Norma EgicOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements. SUMMER 2022 - CEF 547 S.31 RESERVED for SLP program.

  • CEG 523: Historiography

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in graduate History program or MAT Social Studies

    DEC: SBLS

    Introduction to historiography through reading and writing about interpretations of history, historical methods, and major historians. Term paper on historian of choice.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165668S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Summer Session 1 - this class will be offered as an online hybrid course with synchronous and asynchronous components.

    Session 165668S30Jonathan AnzaloneOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - Summer Session 1 - this class will be offered as an online hybrid course with synchronous and asynchronous components.

  • CEG 532: US History to the Civil War

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in graduate History program or MAT Social Studies

    DEC: SBLS

    This field seminar in United States history will survey the major topics and interpretations, beginning with the founding of the British colonies to the start of the Civil War.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65495S30Jonathan AnzaloneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEG 538: US History since 1945

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: SBLS

    This course surveys United States history since 1945 (World War II). Topics of study will include: the postwar economic boom, the rise of a consumer economy, the Cold War, civil and equal rights movements, the decline of industry, the rise of Reagan and conservatism, globalization, the ¿War on Terror¿, and shifting ideas about identity and citizenship in postindustrial America.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65446S30Jonathan AnzaloneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEG 566: Comparative Cultures/ Slavery

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in graduate History program or MAT Social Studies

    DEC: SBLS

    In this course, we will study the history and culture of slavery from a comparative perspective. Delving into the vast historiography on this subject (including both classic texts and new works), we will consider how scholars have investigated and interpreted the role of slavery in different regions and cultural contexts in North America and the greater Caribbean from the colonial era to the early 19th century. Cross-listed as a History graduate course and a CEG course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65894S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: 10-week online, combined synchronous and asynchronous. For MAT Social Studies students. MA/LS students by permission.

    SPD Online65894S30Richard TomczakOnline Sync/Async CombinedThursday06:00-09:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: 10-week online, combined synchronous and asynchronous. For MAT Social Studies students. MA/LS students by permission.

  • CEI 565: Music in Society

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHLS

    Topics in the study of music in relation to its cultural context. This interdisciplinary course studies music as a manifestation of a particular geographical region (e.g., Music in Turn-of-the Century Vienna), of a particular historical era (e.g., Music of the 1960s), and of a particular genre in relation to society. This course may only be repeat twice for a total of 6 credits towards the MA/LS degree.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65485S30Women In Music: Classical Trad Laura KoplewitzOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEP 502: Principles of Coaching

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course will review selected principles of coaching and incorporate an appreciation of this knowledge into a framework of competitive athletics. Attention will be given to the potential of the coach to significantly influence the attitudes, behavior, and physical well-being of players toward their own self-development.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65493S30Theresa TisoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CEP 518: Exercise and Nutrition

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: NSLS

    This course integrates the concepts of nutrition, bioenergetics, and energy expenditure into a wellness paradigm for optimal health. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of macro and micro nutrients and their effects during exercise and training; nutrient bioenergetics; thermoregulation; ergogenic aids; body composition; energy balance and weight control; and optimal nutrition for exercise, training and health. Recommended: A course in anatomy and physiology or CEP 513.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65475S30Lauren BrandOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • CHE 131: General Chemistry IB

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: Online Chemistry Placement and Preparation (OCPP) Process. For information on the OCPP , copy and paste the following link into your browser. go.stonybrook.edu/ocpp Corequisite: MAT 125 or higher

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    This is the initial course in the four-semester General-Chemistry/Organic-Chemistry sequence CHE 131/132/321/322. This sequence provides the necessary foundation for students who wish to pursue further coursework in Chemistry. The General Chemistry courses provide a broad introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including substantial illustrative material drawn from the chemistry of inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems. The emphasis is on basic concepts, problem-solving, and factual material. The principal topics covered are stoichiometry, the states of matter, chemical equilibrium and introductory thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, electron structure and chemical bonding, and chemical periodicity. Students will be placed into CHE 131 based on their performance in an Online Chemistry Placement and Preparation (OCPP) process. The four-semester sequence is inappropriate for students who have completed an AP course in chemistry and received a score of 4 or 5; these students are placed into CHE 152. Three lecture hours and one 80-minute workshop per week. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 129 or CHE 152. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16260331Daniel AmaranteOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Fri.09:30-12:35PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24 at 11:00 am-12:30 pm. Online final: 7/5 at 10:00 am-12:30 pm.

    Session 162601R30TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24 at 11:00 am-12:30 pm. Online final: 7/5 at 10:00 am-12:30 pm.

    Session 162602R32TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:00-06:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24 at 11:00 am-12:30 pm. Online final: 7/5 at 10:00 am-12:30 pm.

    Session 162613R33TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.07:00-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: .Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24 at 11:00 am-12:30 pm. Online final: 7/5 at 10:00 am-12:30 pm.

    Session 163630R34TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:00-02:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24 at 11:00 am-12:30 pm. Online final: 7/5 at 10:00 am-12:30 pm.

    Session 26446635TBAOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Fri.01:30-04:35PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    Session 264465R35TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

  • CHE 132: General Chemistry II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CHE 129 or CHE 131. Pre/Corequisite: MAT 125 for those who took CHE 12 9 or 130 or BA BIO majors; all others MAT 126 or higher

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    A continuation of either CHE 129 or 131, introducing the fundamental principles of chemistry, including substantial illustrative material drawn from the chemistry of inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems. The principal topics covered are stoichiometry, the states of matter, chemical equilibrium and introductory thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, electron structure and chemical bonding, and chemical periodicity. The sequence emphasizes basic concepts, problem solving, and factual material. It provides the necessary foundation for students who wish to pursue further coursework in chemistry. Three lecture hours and one 80-minute workshop per week. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 152. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26433731Daniel AmaranteOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Fri.09:30-12:35PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    Session 264334R30TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    Session 264335R31TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:00-02:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    Session 264336R32TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.07:00-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    Session 264345R33TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:00-06:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    Session 265385R34TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:00-02:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: synchronous online. Online exams 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/6 at 3:00 pm-4:30 pm. Online final: 8/16 at 2:00 pm-4:30 pm.

  • CHE 133: General Chemistry Lab I

    Undergraduate 1 credit

    Pre- or Corequisite: CHE 129 or 131

    Designed to familiarize students with (1) some chemical and physical properties of substances, (2) techniques of quantitative chemistry, and (3) scientific methodology. Three hours of laboratory or related activity per week. CHE 133 and CHE 134 may not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 154. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16339030Susan OatisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 163391L31TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 163392L32TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 163393L33TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 163618L34TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 163622L35TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 163626L36TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

  • CHE 134: General Chemistry Lab II

    Undergraduate 1 credit

    Prerequisites: CHE 133 Pre- or Corequisite: CHE 132

    Designed to familiarize students with (1) some chemical and physical properties of substances, (2) techniques of quantitative chemistry, and (3) scientific methodology. Three hours of laboratory or related activity per week. CHE 133 and CHE 134 may not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 154. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26518430Susan OatisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 265185L31TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 265186L32TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 265187L33TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 265381L34TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

    Session 265383L35TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: All lab experiments are in-person.

  • CHE 310: Chem in Technology & Environm

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: CHE 132 or CHE 152

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Use of chemical principles in understanding processes that occur in the modern technological world and in the natural environment. Certain ecological problems of a chemical nature are analyzed. Methods of controlling these problems are discussed. Not for credit in addition to ENV 320.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16353001TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CHE 310 and CHE 591 and ENV 320

    Session 16353001Daniel AmaranteOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon., Weds., Fri.01:30-03:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CHE 310 and CHE 591 and ENV 320

  • CHE 312: Physical Chem Life Sci

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: CHE 132 or 152; MAT 132 or 142 or 127 or 171 or AMS 161 Pre- or Corequisite: PHY 121 or 125 or 131/133 or 141

    SBC: STEM+

    A one-semester treatment of fundamental concepts of physical chemistry, intended primarily for students of the biological sciences desiring an introduction to physical chemistry. Topics include equations of state; classical thermodynamics and its application to chemical equilibrium in reaction systems, multiphase systems, and electrochemical cells; kinetic theory of gases; transport properties; chemical kinetics. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CHE 301. Not for credit toward the chemistry major.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16238030Fernando RaineriOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous (optional) problem-solving meetings MW 2:00-3:30pm (except exams on W). Exam 1: Wed June 1, 3:30-5:30pm or 9:00-11:00pm; Exam 2: Wed June 15, 3:30pm-5:30pm or 9:00pm-11:00pm; Final Exam: Wed June 29, 3:30pm-5:30pm or 9:00pm-11:00pm).

  • CHE 321: Organic Chemistry I

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CHE 132

    SBC: STEM+

    An introduction to the structure, reactivity, and properties of organic compounds is presented using modern views of chemical bonding. These fundamental ideas are applied to topics ranging from synthetic chemistry to complex functional structures such as lipid bilayers. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16260601TBAOnline/In Person - HybridMon., Weds., Fri.09:30-11:00AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 16260601Zachary KatsamanisOnline/In Person - HybridMon., Weds., Fri.09:30-11:00AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 162604R01TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 162605R02TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:30-11:50AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 165825R03Zachary KatsamanisIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:40-03:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 162616R04TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.03:10-04:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 165959R30Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 165960R31Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:40-03:00PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 165961R32Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:00-06:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 165962R33Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.07:00-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Friday, 7/1/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

  • CHE 322: Organic Chemistry IIA

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CHE 321

    Discussion of the structure, reactivity, and properties of organic compounds introduced in CHE 321 is continued. The chemistry of substances important in biology, medicine, and technology is emphasized. CHE 322 may not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 326. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26440501Zachary KatsamanisOnline/In Person - HybridMon., Weds., Fri.09:30-11:00AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 26440501TBAOnline/In Person - HybridMon., Weds., Fri.09:30-11:00AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 264406R01TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 264407R02TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.10:30-11:50AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 264408R03TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:40-03:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 264414R04TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.03:10-04:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 265964R30TBAOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:00-10:20AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 265965R31Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:40-03:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 265966R32Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.05:00-06:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

    Session 265967R33Zachary KatsamanisOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.07:00-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Recitations R30-R33 are online. Midterm exams will be given during lecture. Final exam: Monday, 8/15/2022, 9:30am-12:00pm. All exams are in-person. Online sections must take exams in-person at SBU or an approved testing center.

  • CHE 327: Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: CHE 134 or CHE 154 Pre- or Corequisite: CHE 321 or CHE 331

    Techniques of isolating and handling organic substances, including biological materials. A one-semester course that provides a basic organic laboratory experience. It is recommended that students take CHE 327 at the same time as or immediately following CHE 322 or 332. Four laboratory hours and one lecture hour per week. Not for credit in addition to CHE 383. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16336830Sajjad HossainOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Lab experiments are in-person. In-person theory quizzes from 12-1 PM on Fridays, June 10 and July 1st. You must be ready with the purchased electronic lab notebook/manual and required material on the first day. Dept consent on 1st day of classes.

    Session 163369L11TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.08:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Lab experiments are in-person. In-person theory quizzes from 12-1 PM on Fridays, June 10 and July 1st. You must be ready with the purchased electronic lab notebook/manual and required material on the first day. Dept consent on 1st day of classes.

    Session 163538L12TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.08:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Lab experiments are in-person. In-person theory quizzes from 12-1 PM on Fridays, June 10 and July 1st. You must be ready with the purchased electronic lab notebook/manual and required material on the first day. Dept consent on 1st day of classes.

    Session 163539L13TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:00-05:00PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Lab experiments are in-person. In-person theory quizzes from 12-1 PM on Fridays, June 10 and July 1st. You must be ready with the purchased electronic lab notebook/manual and required material on the first day. Dept consent on 1st day of classes.

    Session 163572L14TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.01:00-05:00PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Lab experiments are in-person. In-person theory quizzes from 12-1 PM on Fridays, June 10 and July 1st. You must be ready with the purchased electronic lab notebook/manual and required material on the first day. Dept consent on 1st day of classes.

    Session 163621L15TBAIn PersonMon. & Weds.01:00-05:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Lab experiments are in-person. In-person theory quizzes from 12-1 PM on Fridays, June 10 and July 1st. You must be ready with the purchased electronic lab notebook/manual and required material on the first day. Dept consent on 1st day of classes.

  • CHE 361: Nuclear Chemistry

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: Four semesters of chemistry; PHY 126 and 127, or 132/134 or 142 or 171; AMS 161 or MA T 127 or 132 or 142; permission of department through application by January 30; permission of instructor Corequisite: CHE 362

    Properties of radioactive substances and their use in the study of chemical problems, nuclear stability and structure, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay, interactions of radiation with matter, nuclear medicine, isotope applications, and environmental control. Offered in summer only.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16198101Roy LaceyIn PersonTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.08:30-11:00AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This course is restricted to students participating in the ACS/DOE nuclear chemistry summer school program

  • CHE 362: Nuclear Chemistry Laboratory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Corequisite: CHE 361

    Detection and measurement of radiation, electronic instrumentation, radiation safety, and application of radioactivity to chemical problems. Offered in summer only.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 162490L01Roy LaceyIn PersonTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:00-05:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This course is restricted to students participating in the ACS/DOE nuclear chemistry summer school program

  • CHE 591: Chemistry of the Environment

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course provides an overview of the chemistry of environmental processes, environmental degradation, remediation and abatement processes, and energy production. Past actions and current efforts of the chemical enterprise in both exacerbating and addressing anthropogenic environmental degradation are discussed.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16353201TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CHE 310 and CHE 591 and ENV 320

    Session 16353201Daniel AmaranteOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon., Weds., Fri.01:30-03:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CHE 310 and CHE 591 and ENV 320

  • CHE 593: Chemical Demonstrations

    Graduate 3 credits

    The design and implementation of demonstrations to illustrate modern concepts of chemistry.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26532101Bryan HoranIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:30PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CHE 593 and CEN 508. Course meets for 2 weeks: August 1 -August 12

  • CHE 698: Colloquium

    Graduate 0-12 credits

    Fall and Spring,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 162485S27TBAIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 162486S30TBAIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • CHI 111: Elementary Chinese I

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    The first half of a one-year introductory course to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese, with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice supplements class work. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. No student who has had one or more years of Chinese in high school or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency will be permitted to enroll in CHI 111 without written permission from the instructor of the course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16570030Yang LiuOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CHI 112: Elementary Chinese II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in CHI 111 or equivalent or placement into 112. See http://www.stonybrook .edu/commcms/llrc/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    The second half of a one-year introductory course to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese, with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice supplements class work. A student who has had two or more years of Chinese in high school or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency may not take CHI 112 without written permission from the instructor of the course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26570231Yang LiuOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CHI 201: Intensive Intermediate Chinese

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    Prerequisite: CHI 101 or CHI 112 or CHI 120 or equivalent or proficiency in Chinese or placement int o 201 or 211. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/llrc/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: GLO; HUM; LANG

    An intensive, 6-credit, intermediate-level course on spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Drawing upon a communicative approach, this course situates oral and written language in real-life contexts and promotes learner-centered, interactive classroom activities. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHI 211 or CHI 212.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16587930Dongmei ZengOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Email dongmei.zeng@stonybrook.edu with your SBID number if you require permission to enroll

  • CHI 422: Chinese Lyric Prose and Plays

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Advanced level proficiency in Chinese

    DEC: J&3 SBC: HFA+

    Selected masterpieces of lyric prose and drama written during the first half of the 20th century. Students are expected to improve their skills in literature appreciation and to model their own writings after works read in class. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in the Chinese language in all its forms including reading and writing.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16570130Wenxin LiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CME 160: Intro to Nano

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Many benefits of nanotechnology depend on the fact that it is possible to tailor the structures of materials at extremely small scales to achieve specific properties, thus greatly extending the materials science toolkit. Using nanotechnology, materials can effectively be made stronger, lighter, more durable, more reactive, more sieve-like, or better electrical conductors, among many other traits, with respect to their conventional counterparts. The emerging field of nanotechnology develops solutions to science and engineering problems by taking advantage of the unique physical and chemical properties of nanoscale materials. This interdisciplinary course introduces nanomaterials and nano-fabrication methods with applications to composites, coatings, transportation, construction, electronics and biomedical engineering. Basic concepts in research and design methodology and characterization techniques will be demonstrated.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26499230Steve NitodasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CME 201: Sustainable Energy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: TECH

    Assessment of current and future energy delivery systems; extraction, conversion, and end-use will be discussed with the emphasis on meeting 21st Century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be examined and analyzed and their attributes (both positive and negative) described within a framework that takes into account the technical, economic, social, political and environmental objectives associated with a sustainable energy policy. Case studies of specific applications of sustainable energy to societal needs will be analyzed and discussed.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26567930William CalvoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CME 240: Intro To Food Tech

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    This course will introduce students to various topics of food science, such as food processing, nutrition, sensory science, and food safety. Students will examine current challenges facing food scientists in today's global society. Selected chapters from the textbook, as well as articles from news sources, will be assigned.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26568030Yizhi MengOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • COM 120: Fundamentals/Public Speaking

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SPK

    Focuses on the core principles underlying effective oral presentations and the development of effective presentations in public and professional settings. There is an emphasis on analyzing audiences, composing meaningful, coherent messages, conducting responsible research, developing effective arguments, and improving delivery skills to strengthen confidence and credibility. Students will develop skills that lay the foundation for success in future speaking endeavors in both professional and personal settings. This course will also focus on how to make critical judgments as an audience to public discourse. Upon completion of this course students will be more confident and effective speakers and listeners.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26581632TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26581632Christopher BillOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26581733TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26581733Trevor SetvinOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 1 Extended6571130TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 1 Extended6571130Patrick JonesOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.09:30-10:50AMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • COM 699: Master's Pro in Sci Comm

    Graduate 3 credits

    COM 588

    The culminating experience for students in the M.S. in Science Communication. Students will plan, design, and complete a research-based, engaged science communication project of professional caliber. The project should reflect what students have cumulatively learned in the program and respond to the needs of an organization, community, or stakeholder. Students may work individually or in teams. Each project will have written, visual, and/or interactive components.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165970S01Elizabeth BojszaIn PersonFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265971S02TBAIn PersonFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 101: Computer Science Principles

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Level 3 or higher on the mathematics placement examination

    SBC: TECH

    Introduces central ideas of computing and computer science, instills practices of algorithmic and computational thinking, and engages students in the creative aspects of the field. Also introduces appropriate computing technology as a means for solving computational problems and exploring creative endeavors. Includes weekly computer programming assignments, but assumes no previous programming experience.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6184630Kevin McDonnellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: This course is delivered online asynchronously. Exams on June 24 and July 15. Students must have reliable Internet access, a webcam and microphone to take this course.

    Session 1 Extended61847L30Kevin McDonnellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022: This course is delivered online asynchronously. Exams on June 24 and July 15. Students must have reliable Internet access, a webcam and microphone to take this course.

  • CSE 114: Intro to Object-Oriented Prog

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: Level 5 or higher on the math placement exam Advisory Prerequisite: CSE 101 or ISE 108

    SBC: TECH

    An introduction to procedural and object-oriented programming methodology. Topics include program structure, conditional and iterative programming, procedures, arrays and records, object classes, encapsulation, information hiding, inheritance, polymorphism, file I/O, and exceptions. Includes required laboratory. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6184530Ahmad EsmailiOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:30-04:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 1 Extended61844L30Ahmad EsmailiOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 2 Extended6560631Praveen TripathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 2 Extended65605L31Praveen TripathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 214: Data Structures

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in CSE 114

    An extension of programming methodology to data storage and manipulation on complex data sets. Topics include: programming and applications of data structures; stacks, queues, lists, binary trees, heaps, priority queues, balanced trees and graphs. Recursive programming is heavily utilized. Fundamental sorting and searching algorithms are examined along with informal efficiency comparisons.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26451030Ahmad EsmailiOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:45PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

    Session 264509R30TBAOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.01:00-02:10PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • CSE 215: Foundations of Comp Science

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 151 or MAT 125 or MAT 131

    Introduction to the logical and mathematical foundations of computer science. Topics include functions, relations, and sets; recursion; elementary logic; and mathematical induction and other proof techniques.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6181130Pramod GanapathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Asynchronous Online

    Session 1 Extended61812R30Pramod GanapathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Asynchronous Online

  • CSE 216: Programming Abstractions

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in CSE 214; CSE major

    Intermediate-level programming concepts and paradigms, including functional programming, object-orientation, basics of type systems, memory management, program and data abstractions, parameter passing, modularity, and parallel programming. Includes weekly recitations, which provide students with experience in the practice of programming in a variety of high-level languages.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319830Richard McKennaOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:00-12:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

    Session 163199R30Richard McKennaOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.12:30-01:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • CSE 300: Technical Communications

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: WRT 102, CSE or ISE major, U3 or U4 standing

    SBC: SPK; WRTD

    Principles of professional technical communications for Computer Science and Information Systems majors. Topics include writing business communications, user manuals, press releases, literature reviews, and research abstracts. Persuasive oral communications and effective presentation techniques, to address a range of audiences, will also be covered. This course satisfies the upper-division writing requirement for CSE and ISE majors.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320030Richard McKennaOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CSE 300 and ISE 300

  • CSE 310: Computer Networks

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher: CSE 214 or 260; CSE 220 or ISE 218; CSE major or ISE major. Advisory Pre- or Corequisite: AMS 310

    Overview of computer networks and the Internet. Concept of end systems, access networks, clients and servers. Connection-oriented and connectionless services. Circuit switching and packet switching. Description of Internet protocol layers, including application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layer. Architecture of the current Internet and the World-Wide Web. TCP/IP protocol stack. Internet routing and addressing. Local area network protocols, Ethernet hubs and switches. Wireless LANs. Multimedia networking. May not be taken by students with credit for ESE 346.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6561001Aruna BalasubramanianOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 312: Legal Issues in Info Systems

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: CSE or ISE major; U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    SBC: CER; ESI; STAS

    This course deals with the impact of computers on us as individuals and on our society. Rapid changes in computing technology and in our use of that technology have changed the ways we work, play, and interact with other people. These changes have created a flood of new social, legal and ethical issues that demand critical examination. This course is offered as both CSE 312 and ISE 312.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26532431Ali RazaOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Thurs.06:00-08:15PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CSE 312 and ISE 312

  • CSE 351: Introduction to Data Science

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 260; AMS 310; CSE major

    This multidisciplinary course introduces both theoretical concepts and practical approaches to extract knowledge from data. Topics include linear algebra, probability, statistics, machine learning, and programming. Using large data sets collected from real-world problems in areas of science, technology, and medicine, we introduce how to preprocess data, identify the best model that describes the data, make predictions, evaluate the results, and finally report the results using proper visualization methods. This course also teaches state-of-the art tools for data analysis, such as Python and its scientific libraries.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319130Praveen TripathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 548: Analysis of Algorithms

    Graduate 3 credits

    Admission to CSE Graduate Program

    Techniques for designing efficient algorithms, including choice of data structures, recursion, branch and bound, divide and conquer, and dynamic programming. Complexity analysis of searching, sorting, matrix multiplication, and graph algorithms. Standard NP-complete problems and polynomial transformation techniques. This course is offered as both AMS 542 and CSE 548.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6598930Rezaul ChowdhuryOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-08:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 654: Seminar in Visualization

    Graduate 1 credit

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265984S01Klaus MuellerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 656: Seminar in Computer Vision

    Graduate 1 credit

    Current readings in computer vision and image understanding. Prerequisite: Limited to CSE graduate students; others need instructor consent Fall, May be repeated for credit

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265419S30Dimitrios SamarasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSE 659: Seminar in Computer Security

    Graduate 1 credit

    Seminar course, covering various research problems in computer security. Spring,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265941S01Amir RahmatiOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.12:00-01:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSM 610: The Nature and Practice of Sci

    Graduate 3 credits

    An overview of the nature and practice of science through the analysis of current issues in science. Through the extensive use of case studies, students will address questions such as: What is science? What distinguishes science from other ways of knowing? What standards of evidence and scientific explanations, processes, and conventions are used in science? What philosophical, social, ethical, and historical perspectives are important in understanding science? Offered Fall and Spring, 3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163399S01Keith SheppardIn PersonMon. & Weds.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CSM 640: Directed Study in STEM Educ

    Graduate 3 credits

    In their fifth semester students will individually complete a directed study with a faculty advisor. The intent of this course is to prepare the students for the doctoral qualifying examination and assist them in refining their research topics. Offered Fall and Spring, 3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16269101Keith SheppardIn PersonTues. & Thurs.05:30-08:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CWL 305: Forms of Fiction

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: CWL 202

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+; WRTD

    Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through fiction, with examples from the tradition that illustrate point of view, character development, dialogue, plot, setting, theme, motif, and other elements. Areas of study include Short Story, Novella, The Popular Novel, Graphic Novels and Writing Funny. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 165877S01TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 165877S01Karen OffitzerOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • CWL 315: Forms of Scriptwriting

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: CWL 202

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+; WRTD

    Study of the genre through readings, screenings, discussion and regular submission of original writing for film or theater. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through these collaborative media. Areas of study include Fundamentals of Dramatic Action, Visual Storytelling, Message Movies, Writing the One Act, and Extreme Events. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265878S01TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 265878S01Karen OffitzerOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • CWL 530: Forms of Scriptwriting

    Graduate 3-4 credits

    Permission of the instructor and program director

    Regular submission, discussion, and analysis of students' work in one or more of the contemporary modes of scriptwriting, including writing for film, theater, radio, and television. Writing assignments may include exercises, imitations, responses, and original work. Students will examine relevant works that illustrate point of view, character development, dialogue, plot, setting, and other techniques vital to scriptwriting. Specific mode or topic to be studied will be announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and/or departmental consent Offered Fall, Spring, Every Year, 3-4 credits, ABCF Grading May be repeated for credit

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 166039S60Magdalene BrandeisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAManhattan (NYC)Open
    ×

  • CWL 575: Writers Conference

    Graduate 1-6 credits

    Must submit application and writing sample, permission of conference admissions committee and/or pro gram director

    The Southampton Writers Conference is an intensive program of workshops in contemporary writing that includes lectures, readings, workshops, and panels featuring nationally distinguished authors who join the department's summer faculty. Graduate students in the program will assist in planning and running the Conference, and will have the option of taking a Conference workshop for credit. The Writers Conference will also encourage participation by visiting students ¿ new writers, established writers, teachers of writing and editors ¿ who will be admitted by application and may receive academic credit upon request.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265082S30The Southampton Writer's Conf. Susan MerrellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265083S31The Southampton Children's Lit Emma Walton HamiltonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265085S32Directing Conference Christian McLeanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
    ×

  • EBH 200: Evolution of Human Behavior

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 or BIO 202

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    An examination of how evolutionary theory informs our understanding of human behavior, psychology and culture. Topics include assessing what behavioral traits are unique to humans and critical to our ecological expansion. Course will provide a synthetic overview of current topics in human behavioral ecology, evolutionary psychology, and gene-culture coevolution. Formerly offered as ANP 200. Not for credit in addition to ANP 200.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16520830Ann MarkhamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ECO 108: Introduction to Economics

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in MAT 122 or MAT 123 or AMS 151 or level 4 on the mathematics placement e xamination

    DEC: F SBC: SBS

    An introduction to economic analysis. Microeconomics (the study of individual, firm, industry, and market behavior) and macroeconomics (the study of the determination of national income, employment, and inflation). This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16209930Bora YunnOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ECO 303: Intermed Microeconomic Theory

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in ECO 108; C or higher in MAT 125 or AMS 151 or placement level 6 on the mathematics placement examination

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    Analytical study of the behavior of fundamental economic units (consumer and the firm) and its implications for the production and distribution of goods and services. Emphasis on the use of economic theory to provide explanations of observed phenomena, including the analytical derivation of empirically verifiable propositions. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26383630Kamini JainOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 305: Intermed Macroeconomic Theory

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in ECO 108; C or higher in MAT 125 or AMS 151 or placement level 6 on the mathematics placement examination

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    The theory of national income determination, employment, distribution, price levels, inflation, and growth. Keynesian and classical models of the different implications of monetary and fiscal policy. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16252530Yang XuanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 320: Mathematical Statistics

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in MAT 122 or MAT 123 or AMS 151 or placement level 4 on the mathematics placement examination

    An introduction to statistical methods and their properties that are useful in analysis of economic data. Topics include elements of probability theory and its empirical application, univariate and multivariate distributions, sampling distributions, limiting distributions, and point and interval estimation. Regular problem sets and occasional projects are required. Not for credit in addition to AMS 310. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16249730Zhuotong XieOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 321: Econometrics

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in ECO 320 or AMS 310; C or higher in ECO 108

    The application of mathematical and statistical methods to economic theory. Topics include the concept of an explanatory economic model, multiple regression, hypothesis testing, simultaneous equation models, and estimating techniques. Emphasis is placed on the application of econometric studies.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26422630Taek Keun LeeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 326: Industrial Organization

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in ECO 303

    A study of the structure of firms and markets and interactions between them. Price theory, strategic theory and transaction costs analysis are used to illuminate the sources of and limitations on market power of firms. Some empirical evidence, drawn primarily from the U.S. economy, is explored. A brief introduction to antitrust policy and regulatory policy is included.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16251530Boyang LiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 327: Health Economics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in ECO 303 and ECO 305

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    An application of microeconomics to the health sector of the economy. Topics include the demand for health care; the roles of hospitals, physicians, and HMOs in the supply of health care; the role of the government in the provision of health care; and the detriments of health care costs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16239630Ping-Chang LeeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 337: Labor Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in ECO 303

    Microeconomic theory is used to investigate specific topics in the field of labor economics. Areas to be covered include the household's decision-making process and the supply of labor, investments in human capital and discrimination in the marketplace, the effect of market structure on the demand for labor, and the distribution of income.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26424630Mansi SharmaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 355: Game Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: MAT 126 or 131 or 141 or AMS 151; C or higher in ECO 303

    SBC: SBS+

    Introduction to game theory fundamentals with special emphasis on problems from economics and political science. Topics include strategic games and Nash equilibrium, games in coalitional form and the core, bargaining theory, measuring power in voting systems, problems of fair division, and optimal and stable matching. This course is offered as both AMS 335 and ECO 355.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16266730Marc Claveria MayolOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ECO 355 and AMS 335. Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 359: Reading and Writing/Economics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in ECO 303 and ECO 305; WRT 102; U4 standing; ECO major

    SBC: WRTD

    Provides opportunity to practice the skills and techniques of effective academic writing and satisfies the learning outcomes of the Stony Brook Curriculum's WRTD learning objective.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16357130Bora YunnOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26441230Nuria Quella IslaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ECO 360: Money and Banking

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in ECO 305

    An introduction to modern monetary institutions and mechanisms, their relationship to the economy, and governmental policies in this area.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26424530Yemiao KeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Non Stony Brook students: enrollment by permission of dept.

  • ECO 383: Public Finance

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in ECO 303 and 305

    Theories of taxation and the satisfaction of public wants; the nature of public goods; theory of public expenditure; effects of taxes on resource allocation and welfare; theories of tax incidence; fiscal and equity implications of alternative tax schemes; fiscal dynamics and growth; intergovernmental fiscal relations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26593730Kwanjai YooOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EDL 501: Educational Leadership Thry I

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course presents a study of the concepts, theories, methods, and findings dealing with how to remain abreast of research in education and acquire the extensive knowledge of learning theories, leadership theories, creative thinking, teaching, assessment, and the principles of effective schools. Materials will be drawn largely from the behavioral sciences. These will be applied to the practice of educational administration at all levels and in all settings, taking into account cultural diversity and locale. (formerly CEQ 501)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65704S30Stephen SchneiderOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 502: Educational Leadership Thry II

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    The focus of this course will be on organizational behavior. Topics include: the study of roles and relationships; working well with the school staff, students, parents, and community; bureaucracy; social systems; human motivation; using resources effectively; maintaining an orderly physical environment; decision making, leadership and organizational change; communications; and the effect of community and outside influences. (formerly CEQ 502)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65447S30Joseph CentamoreOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65482S31Joseph CentamoreOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 503: Education Leadership Practice

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course helps to articulate the interrelationship between leadership theory and practice and promotes the philosophy that future school leaders should be pro-active. The course deals with administrative decision-making behavior in the context of a community. Students will use simulated materials that reflect the problems and issues of a school district. Political, social, and economic pressures, the educational needs and the establishment of high expectations for staff and students performance are considered, as well as the establishment of systems of rewards and recognition. The use of group dynamics in the decision-making process is emphasized. (formerly CEQ 503)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65448S30Antoinette MacLeodOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 515: School District Leadership

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course is an examination of theories and practices related to school district leadership, administration, supervision, and evaluation. Topics included are organizational structure, engaging teachers, staff, and parents in the decision-making process, curriculum, leadership, supervision, staff development, monitoring and evaluating the school's or program's performance and involving staff in making changes, mechanisms for effecting change, establishing and maintaining ongoing cooperation and collaboration between the home and the school, personnel administration, business management, and school law. (formerly CEQ 515)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65449S30Arnold GoldbergOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65456S31Anthony CavannaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 525: Managerial Accounting:NYS-SDBL

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    An overview for school district business administrators in advanced accounting, financial reporting and internal control concepts for New York State School Districts. Knowledge of advanced concepts in order to properly manage the district's finances, protect its assets and ensure compliance with Federal and State financial related laws and regulations, will assist the student in establishing credibility and respect with his or her future superintendents, School Boards and the general public. Topics in the course will be presented from both a building and district level perspective. (formerly CEQ 525)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65754S30Christopher DillonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 528: School Law

    Graduate 3 credits

    A study of the legal framework within which public education operates. Topics include: church-state relations, state agencies, local school boards, financing education, tort liability, teacher-personnel administration, the Taylor Law, tenure, desegregation, and the constitutional rights and freedoms of students. (formerly CEQ 528)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65465S30David ScottOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65468S31David ScottOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 541: School Building Leadership

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course focuses on the leadership and administrative roles of elementary and secondary school building leaders. Topics include: tasks of a building administrator; building organizations and staff utilization; curriculum development; evaluating the school or program performance and involving the staff in making changes; leadership; engaging teachers, staff, and parents in the decision-making process; facilities management; employee relations, student affairs; public relations; maintaining collaboration between the home and the school and school law. (formerly CEQ 541)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65450S30Jeffrey SoloffOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 555: Supervision of Instruction

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course covers the basic aspects of the supervisory process. Areas included are an overview of supervision, theory and research, organization and function, roles of various personnel in the supervisory process, factors influencing change, improving instruction through individuals and groups, curriculum development, effective use of learning resources and evaluating supervisory programs. (formerly CEQ 555)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65451S30Robert FenterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 571: School Business Administration

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course presents an examination of the duties and responsibilities of the school business administrator including an understanding of the role in relation to other members of the administrative team. Also examined during the course are other aspects of the business administrator's work such as office management, budget procedures, financial management, accounting and auditing, purchasing and supply management, insurance programs, capital outlay and debt service, school plant operation and maintenance, food service, and transportation. (formerly CEQ 571)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65452S30Vito D'EliaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 572: School Personnel Management

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership Post Master's Certificate programs.

    This course examines the nature, scope, and organization of the personnel function and will look at the planning process, collective bargaining (negotiations and contract administration), personnel recruitment (selection, induction, and development), effective work performance appraisal, compensation, and job security issues. An examination of the Federal and State laws and regulations that govern district personnel operations will be included. (formerly CEQ 572)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65453S30Kristen TurnowOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65481S31Rory ManningOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EDL 595: Educational Leader Project Sem

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership programs: prior completion of 24 g raduate credits in the program.

    An advanced graduate course designed to teach students to understand and conduct graduate level research. EDL 595 should be taken immediately before, during or after the internship. Students will be required to conduct an intensive literature review on a topic related to their internship and will be guided in selecting a topic for their research paper. Research methodology and resources will be reviewed, explored and developed. Prerequisite: Matriculation in one of the Educational Leadership programs: prior completion of all foundation and required courses. This course will be GRADED (A, B, C, F). Successful completion requires a grade of "B" or better; otherwise, the course must be repeated in order to graduate. No transfer credit or substitutions permitted. All students are expected to present their research at the EDL Research Fair. Formerly CEQ 595.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65454S30Craig MarksonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65455S31William ClarkOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • EEO 124: C Prog for EE

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141, or level 7 on the mathematics placement exa mination; EEO Major

    An introductory computer programming course using the ANSI C language with emphasis on topics of interest to electrical engineers. Subjects include data types, operations, program control structures, functions, data files, numerical techniques, pointers, structures, and bit operations. Students gain experience in applying the C language to the solution of a variety of electrical engineering problems.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26360330Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 218: Digital Logic Design

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: PHY 132

    SBC: TECH

    The course covers binary numbers, Boolean algebra, arithmetic circuits, flip-flops, analysis and design of sequential circuits, memory and programmable logic.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320730Dmitri DonetskiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 219: Digital Logic Design Lab

    Undergraduate 1 credit

    Pre- or corequisite: EEO 218

    The digital circuits are designed and simulated with CAD tools, assembled on a breadboard and verified with a logic analyzer.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163602L31Dmitri DonetskiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 224: OOP for Elec & Comp Eng

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: EEO 124 or equivalent

    An introduction to object oriented programming using the C++ language. Key aspects of object oriented programming including polymorphism, encapsulation, data hiding, and inheritance will be discussed, as will the difference between procedural and object oriented programming. Good practices to enable effective collaboration and code reuse will be considered. The use of C++ as a hardware description language will be briefly described. Students gain experience in applying the C++ language to the solution of a variety of electrical and computer engineering problems.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26498830Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 271: Electrical Circuit Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: C or higher in AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141, or level 7 on the mathematics placement exa mination; EEO Major

    The course covers the following topics: passive circuit elements: resistors, capacitors, inductors. Elements of circuit topology. Kirchhoff's and Ohm's law. Nodal and mesh analysis. Equivalent circuits. Steady-state AC circuits. Phasors. Transient analysis. Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers). Not for credit in addition to ESE 271.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6600931Thomas RobertazziOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 300: Tech Comm EE Eng

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: WRT 102 or equivalent and EEO 353

    Topics include how technical writing differs from other forms of writing, the components of technical writing, technical style, report writing, technical definitions, proposal writing, writing by group or team, instructions and manuals, transmittal letters, memoranda, abstracts and summaries, proper methods of documentation, presentations and briefings, and analysis of published engineering writing. Also covered are the writing of resumes and cover letters.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319730Ronald MargeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 301: Signals and Systems

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisites: EEO 271 and MAT 303 or AMS 361

    Provides an introduction to continuous-time and discrete-time signals and linear systems. Topics covered include time-domain descriptions (differential and difference equations, convolution)and frequency-domain descriptions (Fourier series and transforms, transfer function, frequency response, Z transforms, and Laplace transforms).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16321430Sangjin HongOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 302: Eng Ethics Soc Impact

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    SBC: STAS

    The study of ethical issues facing engineers and engineering related organizations and the societal impact of technology. Decisions involving moral conduct, character, ideals and relationships of people and organizations involved in technology. The interaction of engineers, their technology, the society and the environment is examined using case studies. Introduction to patents and patent infringement using case studies.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26447830Donna TumminelloOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 306: Random Signals & Systems

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ESE 305

    Random experiments and events; random variables, probability distribution and density functions, continuous and discrete random processes; Binomial, Bernoulli, Poisson, and Gaussian processes; system reliability; Markov chains; elements of queuing theory; detection of signals in noise; estimation of signal parameters; properties and application of auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions; power spectral density; response of linear systems to random inputs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26498630Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 315: Electronics Circuits I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: EEO 271; EEO 218; EEO 219

    Introduction to electronics, concentrating on the fundamental devices (diode, transistor, operational amplifier, logic gate) and their basic applications; modeling techniques; elementary circuit design based on devices.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26493930Ridha KamouaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 331: Intro to Semiconductor Devices

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: AMS 161 or MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or 171; PHY 127/134 or PHY 132/134 or PHY 142

    The principles of semiconductor devices. Energy bands, transport properties and generation recombination phenomena in bulk semiconductors are covered first, followed by junctions between semiconductors and metal-semiconductor. The principles of operation of diodes, transistors, light detectors, and light emitting devices based on an understanding of the character of physical phenomena in semiconductors. Provides background for subsequent courses in electronics.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26494030Ridha KamouaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EEO 388: Foundations of Machine Learn

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: EEO 224 and EEO 306

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of machine learning. Statistical learning framework is utilized for clustering, classification, and prediction tasks. Concepts are reinforced through theoretical and programming assignments, with applications in computer vision, natural language processing and bioinformatics.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26537030Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EGL 121: Global Film Traditions

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 101 or equivalent or Corequisite: WRT 102

    DEC: B SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introductory film course with a focus on the cross-cultural study of film from multiple world traditions. Students will learn the basics of film analysis and terminology. They will also develop a familiarity with film traditions outside the US, including (but not necessarily limited to) parts of Europe, Senegal and other parts of Africa, South Asia (India, Pakistan, and elsewhere), Iran, China, Korea, Japan, and elsewhere.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163402L30Lisa LeBlondOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR HELP WITH PRE-REQS, PLEASE CONTACT ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 130: Literature, Science&Technology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 101 or equivalent or Corequisite: WRT 102

    DEC: H SBC: CER; STAS

    An introduction to the status and role of literature as it engages with scientific and/or technological concepts. Students will consider the principles and concepts that form the basis of knowledge in the humanities and develop awareness of the contexts (historical, social, ethical and disciplinary) in which literature and scientific knowledge emerge. Students will also develop the verbal and written skills to articulate valid arguments on the relationship between literature, science and technology.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26368530Adam PoltrackOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR HELP WITH PRE-REQS, PLEASE CONTACT ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 631-632-7400

  • EGL 194: Film: Mastering the Movies

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 101 or equivalent or Corequisite: WRT 102

    DEC: B SBC: GLO; HUM

    Offers an introduction to film, including a basic familiarity with the terminology of film production and with techniques of film analysis. The course emphasizes critical viewing and writing, with attention to cinematography, editing, sound, narrative, authorship, genre and ideology. The course also offers an introduction to multiple cinematic traditions from across the globe.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26445930Lindsey PelucacciOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 264458L30Lindsey PelucacciOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EGL 218: American Literature II

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102

    DEC: K SBC: HUM; USA

    The study of the literatures of the United States from the American Civil War through the Second World War.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6585030Hayden KindratOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ANY ENROLLMENT ISSUES PLEASE CONTACT THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 243: Shakespeare: Major Works

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

    DEC: I SBC: HUM

    A study of major works in several genres and consideration of Shakespeare's precursors and his influence on the development of drama to the present. Designed for students who want a one-semester survey of Shakespeare.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6591330Bernard KrummOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ANY ENROLLMENT ISSUES PLEASE CONTACT THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 250: English Studies/STEM Majors

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102

    SBC: STAS

    An introduction to the techniques and terminology of close literary analysis and argumentation as applied to poetry, fiction, drama, film, and/or literary non-fiction in ways that engage with topics in Science. Technology, Engineering, and Math. Transfer credit is not accepted for this course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16565730Anthony GomezOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR HELP WITH PRE-REQS, PLEASE CONTACT ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 266: 20th-Century Novel

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

    DEC: G SBC: HUM

    Major works and developments in the modern and contemporary novel. This course is offered as both CLT 266 and EGL 266.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6585130Brian EberleOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ANY ENROLLMENT ISSUES PLEASE CONTACT THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 303: Genre or Media

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102 and EGL 204

    SBC: HFA+

    The study of the development of one literary genre or media form such as fiction, poetry, film, drama, nonfiction prose, or hypertext. Readings include theories and criticism of the form as well as examples of the genre. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16565630Race & Reality Tv Lea BorensteinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR HELP WITH PRE-REQS, PLEASE CONTACT ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

    Session 26520030Graphic Medicine Sohini SenOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EGL 309: Interdisciplinary Study of Lit

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102 and EGL 204

    SBC: HFA+

    The study of literature in English as it affects and is affected by other disciplines such as anthropology, science, sociology, sustainability, the history of ideas, theology, and psychology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26585230Jessica HautschOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ANY ENROLLMENT ISSUES PLEASE CONTACT THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 325: Screenwriting

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102; one D.E.C. B or HUM course; or permission of the instructor

    SBC: ARTS

    A course covering the fundamentals of screenwriting--structure, character creation, visual storytelling, format, the writing of narrative and dialogue--via focused, creative exercises and the writing of several short screenplays. Covers the Genre / Media topic for the English major. Formerly offered as THR 325 Scriptwriting for Film and Television; not for credit in addition to THR 325 Scriptwriting for Film and Television. This course is offered as both EGL 325 and THR 325.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16360630Kenneth WeitzmanOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as THR 325 and EGL 325

  • EGL 346: Shakespeare II

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204 Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205 and 243

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    A study of the tragedies and the romances. Designed to complement EGL 345. Covers the Single Author topic for the English major.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16340430Frank HarderOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR HELP WITH PRE-REQS, PLEASE CONTACT ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 584: Topics in Genre Studies

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: enrollment in the English MA, Ph.D. or MAT programs.

    Changing issues in the historical study of particular genres, such as the novel, lyric poetry, film, drama, etc. Fall, Spring, Summer,

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16337330Shakespeare's Drama Amy CookOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

  • EGL 585: Topics in Cultural Studies

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: enrollment in the English MA, Ph.D. or MAT programs.

    Changing issues in the interdisciplinary study of culture, including literature, popular culture, discourse studies, media studies, etc. Focus is on the analysis of historical contexts and on methods derived from contemporary cultural theory. Fall, Spring,

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26520130Cyberpunk & Hacking In Lit. Jean GrahamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EGL 586: Topics in Gender Studies

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: enrollment in the English MA, Ph.D. or MAT programs.

    Changing historical or theoretical focus on issues in gender studies, sexuality, queer studies, or women's writing. Fall, Spring, Summer

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16584830Environmental Lit. & Film Heidi HutnerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: ANY ENROLLMENT ISSUES PLEASE CONTACT THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • EGL 587: Topics in Race, Ethnic Studies

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: enrollment in the English MA, Ph.D. or MAT programs.

    Changing historical or theoretical focus on issues of race or ethnicity, on U.S., British, or global ethnic literatures, or on experiences, histories, or theories of colonization, decolonization, empire, globalism, or diaspora. Fall, Spring, Summer,

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26368430Diaspora In American Contexts Brandi SoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EMP 506: Strategic Technology Analysis

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course will lay the foundation for an understanding of Operations Management principles for Engineers. Operations Management is the art of transforming ideas and materials into true value-added for company stakeholders. In this course we will explore the entire value chain from design to forecasting to supply chain management, production and quality control. We will look at the latest trends in global Operations theory, but will not forget the basics of good management. We will use several case studies to get real-world experience and emphasize situational learning. We will also discuss several quantitative methods for analyzing and controlling cost, lead time, and quality of the goods or services being produced.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16597630Richard GucciardoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EMP 518: Technology Projects

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course will lay the foundation for an understanding of project management principles for Engineers. We will delve into conflict resolution and time management and spend a good deal of time talking about the importance of management support in engineering companies. Quantitative approaches to planning, time, cost and performance will be compared and contrasted and critical trade-offs will be explored. Other topics will include planning, organizing, and controlling resources; monitoring progress toward objectives; identifying and managing risks; communicating effectively; setting priorities; and writing engineering proposals. The systems approach will be emphasized. Finally, we will identify future trends and take a look at various case studies that will sharpen our problem-solving skills for when we undergo a "live" engineering project.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26597730Richard GucciardoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ENS 301: Contemp Environ Issues&Policy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status; ENS major or minor or permission of instructor

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    The scientific, socioeconomic, legal and legislative aspects of current environmental issues and policies. Invited experts address current environmental issues and policies of local, regional and global significance. Topics may include: land use practices and reform, farmland and open space preservation; soil and water conservation; wetlands protection and rehabilitation; waste management and reduction, recycling and composting; air pollution, global warming and sea level rise; and marine wilderness areas.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16605901Tara RiderIn PersonAppointmentTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only-Tanzania

    Session 265950S01Tara RiderIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - IRELAND

  • ENV 301: Long Island Pine Barrens

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: U3 or U4 status and one of the following: BIO 201, CHE 131, ECO 108, ESG 100, ESG 198 , GEO 101, GEO 102, MAR 104, SUS 113 (formerly SBC 113)

    DEC: H SBC: SPK; STAS

    The ecologically diverse Long Island Pine Barrens region provides a habitat for a large number of rare and endangered species, but faces challenges associated with protection of a natural ecosystem that lies in close proximity to an economically vibrant urban area that exerts intense development pressure. In this course we will consider the interaction of the ecological, developmental and economic factors that impact the Pine Barrens and the effectiveness of decision support systems in promoting sustainability of the Pine Barrens.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16323731Sharon PochronIn PersonMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Mandatory Field Trip, Saturday June 4, 9:00-4:00

  • ESE 224: Adv. Prog. & Data Structures

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: ESE 124

    The course presents fundamental data structures and algorithms frequently used in engineering applications. Object oriented programming in C++ is used to teach the concepts. Discussed topics include: programming and applications of data structures; stacks, queues, lists, heaps, priority queues, and introduction to binary trees. Recursive programming is heavily utilized. Fundamental sorting algorithms are examined along with informal efficiency analysis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26499630Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265957L30Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 271: Electrical Circuit Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or 171 or AMS 161 Pre/co-requisite: PHY 127/134 or 132/134 or 142

    The course covers the following topics: passive circuit elements: resistors, capacitors, inductors. Elements of circuit topology. Kirchhoff's and Ohm's law. Nodal and mesh analysis. Equivalent circuits. Steady-state AC circuits. Phasors. Transient analysis. Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6183830Thomas RobertazziOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This course used an automatic waitlist. GPNC grading option not available.

  • ESE 273: Microelectronic Circuits

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ESE 271

    This is the first integrated circuits class that introduces the students to the fundamentals of the non-linear devices and design of IC amplifiers. The course starts with the introduction to the device physics, operation and modeling of a diode. Operation of MOS transistor, derivation of the large-signal transistor current as a function of the terminal voltages in different regions of operation is then presented, along with the small-signal model. Single-stage amplifier structures are explored, along with the introduction of the implementation of current source and current mirror. Frequency-response of common-source amplifier is presented. The concepts of multi-stage amplification and differential pair are introduced. Operation modeling of bipolar transistors are presented, along with the common-emitter amplifier. Comparison of MOS and BJT transistor and performance of common-source and common-emitter is presented.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26495830Ridha KamouaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 300: Technical Communication

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102; ESE or ECE major, U3 standing; ESE 280

    Topics include how technical writing differs from other forms of writing, the components of technical writing, technical style, report writing, technical definitions, proposal writing, writing by group or team, instructions and manuals, transmittal letters, memoranda, abstracts and summaries, proper methods of documentation, presentations and briefings, and analysis of published engineering writing. Also covered are the writing of resumes and cover letters.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16321230Ronald MargeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 301: Engineering Ethics

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    The study of ethical issues facing engineers and engineering related organizations and the societal impact of technology. Decisions involving moral conduct, character, ideals and relationships of people and organizations involved in technology. The interaction of engineers, their technology, the society and the environment is examined using case studies. Introduction to patents, copyright, trademarks and infringement using case studies.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26499830Donna TumminelloOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 305: Deterministic Signals & Systms

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Pre- or Corequisite: ESE 271

    Introduction to signals and systems. Manipulation of simple analog and digital signals. Relationship between frequencies of analog signals and their sampled sequences. Sampling theorem. Concepts of linearity, time-invariance, causality in systems. Convolution integral and summation; FIR and IIR digital filters. Differential and difference equations. Laplace transform, Z-transform, Fourier series and Fourier transform. Stability, frequency response and filtering. Provides general background for subsequent courses in control, communication, electronics, and digital signal processing.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16317130Sangjin HongOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 306: Random Signals & Systems

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ESE 305

    Random experiments and events; random variables and random vectors, probability distribution functions, random processes; Binomial, Bernoulli, Poisson, and Gaussian processes; Markov chains; significance testing, detection of signals, estimation of signal parameters; properties and application of auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions; power spectral density; response of linear systems to random inputs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26499730Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 331: Semiconductor Devices

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: AMS 361 or MAT 303; PHY 127/134 or PHY 132/134 or PHY 142

    The course covers physical principles of operation of semiconductor devices. Energy bands and energy band diagram, carrier densities, transport properties, generation recombination phenomena in bulk semiconductors, and the continuity equation are covered first. Equipped with an understanding of the character of physical phenomena in semiconductors, students learn the principles of operation, current-voltage characteristics, and nonidealities of p-n junction diodes, metal-semiconductor contacts, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26498930Ridha KamouaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESE 388: Foundations of Machine Learn

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: ESE 224 and ESE 306

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of machine learning. Statistical learning framework is utilized for clustering, classification, and prediction tasks. Concepts are reinforced through theoretical and programming assignments, with applications in computer vision, natural language processing and bioinformatics.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26537130Vibha ManeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESG 111: Progrmng for Engnrs

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Pre- or Corequisites: AMS 151 or MAT 125 or 131 or 141; PHY 125/133 or 131/133 or 141

    Introduces computer programming techniques for engineering students who have not completed any programming courses prior. Students learn the basics of programming in general and programming MATLAB in particular. This is designed for students to become comfortable enough to continue learning MATLAB and other programming languages on their own.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320530Maya KogaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESG 201: Learning from Disaster

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    The role of the engineer is to respond to a need by building or creating something along a certain set of guidelines (or specifications) which performs a given function. Just as importantly, that device, plan or creation should perform its function without fail. Everything, however, does eventually fail and, in some cases, fails with catastrophic results. Through discussion and analysis of engineering disasters from from nuclear meltdowns to lost spacecraft to stock market crashes, this course will focus on how modern engineers learn from their mistakes in order to create designs that decrease the chance and severity of failure.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26568130Gary HaladaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESG 332: Materials Sci I: Struct & Prop

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: CHE 131 and CHE 133 or equivalent (or Mechanical Engineering majors may use MEC 301 a s a corequisite)

    A study of the relationship between the structure and properties of engineering materials and the principles by which materials' properties are controlled. The structure and structural imperfections in simple crystalline materials and the role that these factors play in defining electrical conductivity, chemical reactivity, strength, and ductility are considered. The molecular structure of polymers is discussed and related to the behavior of plastics, rubbers, and synthetic fibers. The principles of phase equilibria and phase transformation in multicomponent systems are developed. These principles are applied to the control of the properties of semiconductors, commercial plastics, and engineering alloys by thermochemical treatment. Corrosion, oxidation, and other deterioration processes are interpreted through the interaction of materials with their environment.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16314530Maya KogaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • ESM 121: Better Planet By Design

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: STAS

    The course explores new ways of steering technological progress for a better planet. The lectures will blend introductory concepts of environmental science, engineering, social sciences, economics and health in relation to environmental protection and pollution prevention. They will be suitable for engineering, science, humanities and social science majors. This course will illustrate concepts of novel and sustainable technologies for improving water systems, air quality and waste. It will allow learners to understand the limitations of technological approaches as political, social and economic barriers are often more significant than the engineering challenges.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16568230Alexander OrlovOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • ESM 150: Materials of the Modern World

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Level 3 or higher on the mathematics placement examination

    SBC: TECH

    Many of the technologies we rely on in our everyday lives - e.g. bridges, buildings, and other infrastructure, computers and modern electronics, energy efficient means of transportation, among many others - have only been made possible through the development and implementation of cutting-edge materials. Materials science principles will be introduced in the context of modern-day engineering applications. An overview of materials structure and its implications for engineering properties will be discussed and connected to real-world technologies through case studies. Design, selection, and problem solving techniques in material science will be demonstrated through problem sets and an interactive materials design project. Note: This course may not be used by ESG majors as a substitute for ESG 332.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16568330Steve NitodasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 100: Multimedia Projects

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    This course introduces computer applications and a selection of multimedia tools and the skills necessary to be successful in today's digital world including the creation of digital graphics, animations, and the production of audio and video using multimedia tools like: Dreamweaver, Flash, Photoshop, and Jing. Students will learn effective information presentation skills using Microsoft Office Suite and Wikis, blogs and other social media tools. The course emphasizes the use of multimedia research, application, design and presentation skills. Participation in weekly computer labs are required.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16317230Matthew HenigmanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26500020Manda FirmansyahOnline SynchronousThursday11:00-12:40PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: For STEP/CSTEP students only. Course meets synchronously online.

    Session 26500020TBAOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:45-10:45AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: For STEP/CSTEP students only. Course meets synchronously online.

  • EST 104: Projects/ Technology & Society

    Undergraduate 1-3 credits

    Prerequisite: Permission of department

    Introduces students to technological issues in society. A new topic is presented each semester. Explores underlying scientific and engineering concepts, ethical issues, and technological risks. Students complete a project with faculty supervision. May be repeated for up to a limit of 6 credits but only 3 credits of EST 104 may be used for major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16363925Lizsaura GonzalezOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26476511Dorys JohnsonOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.08:15-10:15AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR STEP OR CSTEP STUDENTS, PERMISSION ONLY

    Session 26498720Dorys JohnsonOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.10:30-12:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR STEP OR CSTEP STUDENTS, PERMISSION ONLY

    Session 26492325Dorys JohnsonOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.02:45-04:45PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: FOR STEP OR CSTEP STUDENTS, PERMISSION ONLY

  • EST 105: Dig. Gen: Social Media Skills

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Students today face many challenges keeping up with technology trends and the skills necessary to be successful in the digital world. In this course students will develop the 21st century skills necessary to become effective lifelong learners leading to a successful career. We will explore a number of topics including information literacy, digital citizenship, understanding social media, collaborative environments and cloud based applications as we as organizing your digital world. The culminating activity for this course is the creation of a personal technology learning and management plan showcasing the tools and skills learned throughout the course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319431TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 106: Dig. Gen.: Prof. Web Presence

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Creating a positive digital profile can be a challenging task for the 21st century student. In this course, learn how to utilize the power of the Internet and social media to enhance your web presence and digital profile. We will explore a number of topics including building a strong web presence, leveraging social media, creating and uploading video content, blended and distance learning as well as mobile devices as a learning tool. The culminating activity for this course is the creation of a positive and sustainable web presence and digital profile.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26496430Donald HebererOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 194: Decision-making

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: TSM major or permission of instructor or department.

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    Reviews common justifications for decisions through quantitative, algorithmic processes and reducing multiple criteria to one variable. Covers basic concepts in cost-benefit analysis, risk assessment, decision trees, expected monetary value, and the analytical hierarchy process. Discussions include uncertainties associated with translating qualitative criteria into quantified variables and assigning values to probabilistic events.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16598331TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26498520Alaa Abd-El-HafezOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: STEP/CSTEP students only by permission

  • EST 201: Technological Trends in Societ

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Explores the impact of technology and engineering design on society past, present, and future. The main themes as they relate to changing technology are: industry and the economy; the environment; social, educational, and psychological implications of computers; energy and society; warfare; and 21st-century emerging technologies.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26491630Edwin TjoeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 205: Intro to Tech Design

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Using a design thinking approach to solve real world problems with technology, broadly defined. Design is treated as a universal human activity comprised of learnable principles, processes and skills. Students will identify a need (through empathy), define a problem, and work in a team on a technological solution, using prototyping and testing to refine their design. Over the semester, students will create and work on a collaborative website for their project. They will also learn two online technologies (one for 3D modeling, the other for app development) which they may use to prototype their design.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16314430TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 209: Introduction to Italian Design

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: STAS

    Italian material and aesthetic culture as a source for design and technology. Lectures and design in CAD practice especially for engineering students. The work of the American, global and Italian design practitioners, in a study abroad class in Rome. This is a series of practices in traditional, modern, and transmedia Italian design with the focus on automobile design as a capstone. The student will apply the aesthetic and engineering concepts from the Italian national culture and use written essay, hand drawing, and CAD drawing in open source software, in order to understand the links between the application of any design technology and the general aesthetics of the Italian culture. The student will synthesize quantitative and/or technical information in the design of products, and auto design and make informed judgments about the origin and reciprocal relationship between the technology of commodities, design in general, and the Italian humanities.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26594401Phillip BaldwinIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students Only - ITALY

  • EST 210: Emerging Tech in Atypical Ops

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

    SBC: TECH

    This course will cover topics surrounding the current operations, and future outlooks of technological impact in modern society and unconventional uses of such. A unique part of this course is the practical applications of leading-edge operational technologies will be introduced such as IoT Devices, AI, as well as functional uses of drone technology in society today. Students will gain an understanding of the foundations of "thinking outside the box", emergency preparedness, and the surrounding core values of ethics, planning, and decision making.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26591901TBAOnline/In Person - HybridWednesday06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26591901Steven WongOnline/In Person - HybridMonday06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 280: Fundmtls of Indstrl Engnrng

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or higher in AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141, or level 7 on the mathematics placement exam ination

    SBC: TECH

    This course will cover Fundamental Industrial Engineering concepts and practices.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26597330Kevin MoriartyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 304: Communication for Engr & Sci

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: WRT 102; TSM major or permission of department.

    In today's society, it is essential for educated people to be able to present technical information to a range of audiences using various communication methods and styles. In EST 304, students learn how to communicate technical concepts that make sense not only to other scientists and engineers, but also to audiences ranging from students to technical consumers in the world marketplace. Course content emphasizes: writing clearly, concisely, and persuasively; creating effective visuals; presenting research verbally during oral presentations; providing and receiving feedback on assignments; and working collaboratively in groups. Written, verbal and visual communication styles are examined.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16593830Krista ThybergOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 305: App Software for Info Mgt

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: EST 100 or CSE 101

    Introduction to the role of applications software in various types of organizations with emphasis on methods of formulating the requisite information flows to engender adequate communications, operation, and control. The importance of audit ability, maintainability, and recoverability in systems design is stressed. Provides students with knowledge of basic techniques and elementary skills in representing system structure with application of the principles in practical case studies using spreadsheet and database software. Extensive interaction with applications software reinforces concepts presented.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26597430TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 310: Design of Computer Games

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Advisory Prerequisite: Basic Computer Skills

    SBC: TECH

    Fundamental ideas underlying the design of games, which occurs before the programming stage. How games function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of visual, audio, tactile and textual elements into the total game experience. Game design documentation and play testing. Students will design their own game during the semester. This course is offered as both EST 310 and ISE 340.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26597530TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 320: Communication Tech Systems

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: MAT 123; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Emphasizes basic science and engineering concepts underlying design and usage of modern telecommunications systems. Considers effects of human factors and societal constraints on design and development of nascent technological systems. Includes the electromagnetic spectrum, analog and digital signals and resonance as well as societal considerations of government regulations, international competition, and environment.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338530Marypat TaverasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 325: Technology in the Workplace

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one D.E.C. category E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    A study of automation and information technologies in both manufacturing and service industries. Considers how technology is changing the work and lives of everyone from production workers to executives. Case studies are used to understand how technology can improve quality and productivity and how incorrect use produces disappointing results.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16288530Rita Reagan-RedkoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This class is ONLINE and will be run through blackboard. You will be automatically added to blackboard when you register for the class. If you have any problems please contact the department.

  • EST 326: Management for Engineers

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    This course will introduce all the principals and theories in the area of operation management and quality control. The important issues relating to management of innovation and project management will also be included.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26499330Peter JanowOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 327: SysEngr Mgt Prdct Dsgn/Dvlpmnt

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: AMS 161 or MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or 171; WRT 102; CEAS major or permission of the depa rtment.

    This course serves as an introduction to the process of product design and development as it relates to a Systems Engineering approach. This course will familiarize students with technical product design and development systems, as well as engineering research methods. This Systems Engineering course also includes the advantages and limitations of creative product design, effective and efficient paths to successful implementations, technical reviews, and technical risks associated with cost, scheduling and performance goals. This course introduces the Agile system development process, emphasizing a design process that uses continuous input by customers/end users to define user needs of the initial design specifications.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26499030Marypat TaverasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 391: Technology Assessment

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or 171 or AMS 161; U3 or U4

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    This class focuses on technologies and the systems in which they evolve to highlight different forms of evaluating technology. An overview of various methods, approaches, and tools for evaluation will be provided, including SWOT, STIP, forecasting, lifecycle assessments, and impact and risk assessments. The class will provide a context and framework for understanding policy applications of various technologies, as well as broader societal implications. Challenges and opportunities of technological change will be examined in the context of societal implications, including environmental change, ethics, economics, science and engineering, and infrastructure. Students evaluate real-world technologies throughout the semester.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16317730Kevin MoriartyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 392: Engineering Economics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or 171 or AMS 161 Advisory Prerequisites: EST 391; EST 393

    DEC: F SBC: SBS

    This course has a systems analysis approach to problems of planning and design in manufacturing and technical sectors of industry, using principles of cash flow equivalencies. It covers aspects of engineering alternatives through financial concepts including time value of money, annual cost, present worth, incremental rate of return and cost-benefit analysis, analysis of various types of cash flows, development of rate of return, benefit-to-cost ratios, depreciation and the effects of investment tax assessment. Capital allocation theory is used to evaluate competing investment programs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26448330Kevin MoriartyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 393: Project Management

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or 171 or AMS 161; U3 or U4

    This course addresses fundamental project management concepts and skills needed to successfully initiate, lead, monitor, control and realize projects execution. In this course, students explore project management with a practical approach through case studies and group projects.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16493330Eduardo PalacioOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 441: Interdis Senior Project

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: EST 440

    Students will select a technology-oriented topic, one that could be related to a selected class theme or be of their choosing. Students will work individually on the topic and present on their research. A paper will also be produced. A book on describing what "technology" is, and how new technologies develop, will be closely read.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6599921TBAIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 565: Foundations of Technology in E

    Graduate 3 credits

    Throughout this course students will explore the basic pedagogical issues and social impact of using technology in education. This course examines the basic principles of integrating technology and computer applications into the curriculum. Students will learn how to use and integrate word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications for educator planning and student project work. Students will also learn how to use a number of online based Web 2.0 applications within school curriculum. The culminating activity for this course is the design and a presentation of a micro-lesson using one these applications as they would in the classroom. Fall, Spring, Summer, 3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16591030Lori ScarlatosOnline SynchronousMonday07:00-10:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 570: Educational Technology Lesson

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: EST 565

    In this course students will learn principles of instructional design and how to fully integrate technology into daily curriculum. Throughout the course students will plan, develop and evaluate a lesson plan that demonstrates an expertise in the integration of educational technology. Students will apply the skills, techniques, resources and research necessary to effectively create an educational technology inspired lesson plan. The lesson plan may include the use of emerging technologies, distance learning, multimedia projects, collaborative environments, computer applications and Internet resources. The culminating project for this course is the completion of a lesson plan in a specific content area that incorporates multiple modalities of technology into pedagogical practices. Fall, Every year, 3 credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16591230Lori ScarlatosOnline SynchronousThursday07:00-10:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • EST 573: Interactive Multimedia Curricu

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course allows students to learn how to use a variety of multimedia tools for the classroom. Principles of user interface and interaction design will be covered. Throughout the course students design an interactive unit plan using multimedia authoring software. Students will work with audio/video editing software, collaborative learning software, and learn how to embed online games, activities and video within their unit plan. Development of the interactive multimedia unit requires students to: submit a proposal, use graphic organizers to plan and design, create a draft version, create assessment tools, test market with a specific target audience, then evaluate the unit before the final version is completed. The culminating activity is the presentation and delivery of the finished interactive multimedia unit. Fall, Spring, and Summer, 3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265978L20Tatiana TchoubarOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FIN 536: Fnncl Mngmnt

    Graduate 3 credits

    MBA 502 or FINMS or FNBMB

    How managers should interface with accounting and finance departments and how firms meet their financial objectives. Financial tools and techniques, which can be used to help firms maximize value by improving decisions relating to capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management are explained. Related topics include multinational financial management, risk management, and mergers and aquisitions. Prerequisite: MBA 502 Fall

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26517030Gokhan TornaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FIN 552: Mrgrs and Acqustns

    Graduate 3 credits

    MBA 502 or FINMS, or FNBMB

    The focus of this course is on buying a controlling stakes in firms. The main topics to be covered are: Growth through acquisitions, Critical Steps in the M&A Process, financial valuation of mergers and friendly acquisitions, hostile takeovers and buyouts. The course should be of interest to students interested in pursuing careers as private equity investors, advisors in investment banking and corporate managers. Prerequisite: MBA 502, MBA 504 Fall, 3 credits, ABCF grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16335430Gokhan TornaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FLA 307: Critical Pedagogy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Foreign Language Teacher Preparation Program

    An introduction to the theories and practices of critical pedagogy. Critical pedagogy assembles numerous forms of academic approaches to teaching and curriculum that are informed by critical social theory. As the educational arm of critical social theory, critical pedagogy engages educators in understanding the relationships among knowledge, ideology, and power. We will read works from several critical pedagogy theorists to explore and analyze some of the key themes within critical pedagogy (education & power; difference & pluralism; transformative education; the social construction of knowledge; dialogic relations in the classroom; teaching for social justice). Learning through collaborative inquiry, we will translate the theories in these readings into practice and will test concepts of teaching and learning "critical (second/foreign) language and literacy" in a school setting.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6182530Sini SanouOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FLA 307 and FLA 507

  • FLA 439: Tech Lit for Lang Teachers

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: FLA 339

    SBC: TECH

    Technology as a transformative drive of new literacies is no longer an option but a requirement in every aspect of education today. FLA 439 is designed as a course to help teacher candidates explore in a very hands-on, practical and applied manner all of the technologies used by teachers of languages. The emphasis will be on learning about the technologies, creating with the technologies, and making informed decisions using them. The class will also discuss how the technologies relate to current language pedagogies, both for individualized and classroom learning.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16358701Frank ScriccoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FLA 439 and FLA 570

  • FLA 507: Critical Pedagogy

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: FLA 340/506 for students in the MA in Romance Languages and students in the MAT progra ms. Students in the Women Studies (Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies) will need instructor consent.

    This graduate seminar is intended to introduce the ideas, theories, and practices that together constitute the field known as critical pedagogy. Critical pedagogy assembles numerous forms of academic approaches to teaching and curriculum that are informed by critical social theory. As the educational arm of critical social theory, critical pedagogy engages educators in understanding the relationships among knowledge, ideology, and power. We will read works from several critical pedagogy theorists (Freire, Shor, Giroux, McClaren, Apple, hooks) to explore some of the key themes within critical pedagogy (relationship of education to power; issues of difference and pluralism; transformative education; the social construction of knowledge; dialogic relations in the classroom; teaching for social justice). Learning through collaborative inquiry, we will translate the theories in these readings into practice and will test ideas and concepts unique to teaching and learning "critical (second/foreign) language" in a school setting.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended61824S30Sini SanouOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FLA 507 and FLA 307

  • FLA 570: Intro Media Language Teaching

    Graduate 3 credits

    Course open to non-D.A. students. Gives students an introduction to all of the technology used in teaching languages; audio, video, computer, and Internet. Emphasis is on hands-on use and practical applications. Fall or spring Prerequisites: FLA 505 and FLA 506

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16358801Frank ScriccoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FLA 439 and FLA 570

  • FLM 102: Intro to Film/TV Composition

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: HUM

    Introduction to the nuts and bolts of filmmaking and television as viewed through the lens of the working practitioner. By examining the creative aspects of films and television shows, the tools, the language and the choices of professionals, participants learn to interpret the creative elements of film and TV from a practitioner's perspective.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26589201Amy GaipaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FLM 576: Film Workshop

    Graduate 1-6 credits

    The workshops are intensive classes in various aspects of the craft of film, including producing, directing, editing, cinematography, lighting design, sound design, screenwriting, directing, acting, scheduling, budgeting, writing/directing webisodes, writing, producing and directing within the Dogme tradition, and episodic television, sitcoms, dramas, mini-series, and distribution; together with lectures, readings, seminars, and panels featuring nationally distinguished artists. These workshops encourage participation by visiting students, new theatre and film artists, established film artists, and teachers who will be admitted by application and may receive academic credit upon request. Graduate students may take any Film Workshop sponsored by the MFA program for academic credit. Study may occur in Southampton, Manhattan, or abroad. A submission of a workshop application, and permission of instructor are required. 1-6 Credits. Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) ¿May be repeated for credit. Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265084S30Writing, Producing And Directi Magdalene BrandeisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
    ×

  • FLM 660: Acting Workshop

    Graduate 3 credits

    Intensive study in acting in a particular approach or technique. Rehearsals outside of the scheduled class time may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.). May be repeated for credit.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163577S01Acting Immersion TBAIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
    ×

  • FRN 101: Intensive Elementary French

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An intensive course covering the elementary French program (FRN 111, 112) in one semester. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of French in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take FRN 101 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after any other course in French.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16206130TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 101/FRN 112 and FRN 592 Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 16206130Leslie MarinoOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-11:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 101/FRN 112 and FRN 592 Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26445130Michael DesalvoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 101/FRN 112 and FRN 592 Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26446731TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Online Synchronous and asynchronous Offered as FRN 112 and 101

    Session 26446731Michael DesalvoOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon. & Weds.03:00-04:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Online Synchronous and asynchronous Offered as FRN 112 and 101

  • FRN 112: Elementary French II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in FRN 111 or placement into 112. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/l lrc/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An introduction to spoken and written French, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Language Center supplements class work. May not be taken for credit in addition to FRN 101.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16210030TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 112/FRN 101 and FRN 592. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 16210030Leslie MarinoOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-11:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 112/FRN 101 and FRN 592. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26445230Michael DesalvoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 112/FRN 101 and FRN 592. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26539731TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Online Synchronous and asynchronous Offered as FRN 112 and 101

    Session 26539731Michael DesalvoOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon. & Weds.03:00-04:20PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Online Synchronous and asynchronous Offered as FRN 112 and 101

  • FRN 201: Intensive Intermediate French

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    Prerequisite: FRN 101 or 112 or placement into 201. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: GLO; HUM; LANG

    Review of grammar and analysis of simple French texts through reading, writing, and discussion. Language Center supplements class work. May not be taken for credit in addition to FRN 211 or FRN 212.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26439830TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 201, 211, 212, and 593 Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26439830Leslie MarinoOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-11:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 201, 211, 212, and 593 Synchronous and asynchronous online

  • FRN 211: Intermediate French 1

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: FRN 101 or 112 or placement into 201. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: GLO; LANG

    Development of functional competence in speaking, listening, reading and writing in interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Connection of French to other disciplines. Expansion of insight into the nature of languages and cultures. Study and discussion of history and culture of the Francophone world through film, literature, music, newspapers. May not be taken for credit in addition to FRN 201.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26442730TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 201, 211, 212, and 593 Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26442730Leslie MarinoOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-11:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 201, 211, 212, and 593 Synchronous and asynchronous online

  • FRN 212: Intermediate French 2

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: FRN 211 or placement into 212. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/llrc/placement_ch allenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: GLO; HUM; LANG

    Development of functional competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture in interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Emphasis on comparison of languages and cultures and on the use of the French language in communities both within and beyond the university setting. Study and discussion of cultures in the French speaking world through film, literature, music, newspapers. May not be taken for credit in addition to FRN 201.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26439730TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 201, 211, 212, and 593 Students enrolled in FRN 212 take only the second half of the course. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26439730Leslie MarinoOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-11:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 201, 211, 212, and 593 Students enrolled in FRN 212 take only the second half of the course. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

  • FRN 313: Vocabulary through Pop Culture

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: FRN 212 or FRN 201

    SBC: HFA+

    A course designed to increase vocabulary and oral comprehension of French through the study of realms from clothing and banking to love and music.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6182130Sini SanouOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FRN 410: Business French

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: FRN 312

    DEC: S3 SBC: SBS+

    A course designed for students who wish to become more proficient in reading, writing, and translating French. Students also are trained in the use of French in business, in administration, and in everyday professional life. Emphasis is placed on the idiomatic peculiarities of the French language and the relation of French to the structure of English.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26581101TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26581101Martin MaillotOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon. & Weds.05:30-06:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FRN 511: Business French

    Graduate 3 credits

    A course designed to provide efficiency in spoken and written business French with an emphasis on bilingual translation. This course will also familiarize students with French business domestically, in the context of the European Union, and in contrast to America. Issues of current importance as well as institutions will be studied. Students will also carry on individual projects such as comparing marketing strategies of an American company in the US and in France or profiling a major French company.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26581201TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26581201Martin MaillotOnline Sync/Async CombinedMon. & Weds.05:30-06:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • FRN 592: Language Acquisition II

    Graduate 1-4 credits

    FRN 591

    Elementary French II intended for graduate students from other programs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16256930TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 592 and FRN 112/FRN 101. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 16256930Leslie MarinoOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday09:30-11:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 592 and FRN 112/FRN 101. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

    Session 26445330Michael DesalvoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as FRN 592 and FRN 112/FRN 101. Meeting dates TBA. Synchronous and asynchronous online

  • GEO 102: The Earth

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    A summary of the processes that have shaped the earth and the other terrestrial planets as inferred from study of their surface materials, structural features, and interiors. Topics include the earth in the solar system; earth materials and rock-forming processes; surface processes and their bearing on human activities; crustal deformation and global tectonics; the earth's interior; and the geological features, compositions, and evolution of the terrestrial planets. Not for credit in addition to GEO 122.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16261530Christiane StidhamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    ×

    Session 26424330Christiane StidhamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • GEO 304: Energy, Mineral Resrcs & Envir

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    A survey of the origin, distribution, and importance to modern civilization of the fuels and minerals won from the earth. Geology of mineral resources and problems of finding, extracting, and supplying fossil fuels, metallic ores, water, and non-metallic commodities to industry and community as well as the ultimate limits of their abundances. Environmental concerns related to the exploitation of mineral resources with review of legislation and other steps being taken to minimize environmental damage.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26580801Mirza BegOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • GEO 313: Understanding Water Resources

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    DEC: H SBC: ESI; STAS

    A survey of the world's water resources and the fundamental processes and concepts that govern their distribution and resupply. Topics to be covered include processes in the hydrologic cycle, water resource supply and demand, water quality, and societal aspects relating to drinking water, and industrial and agricultural water usage. Consideration is given to global water shortages, projected impacts of climate change, water-based conflict, water resource management, and conservation practices. Detail will be devoted to pollution sources, water quality standards, drinking water treatment, and government regulation. Local water issues will also be addressed.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26439930Mirza BegOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • GEO 513: GIS Fundamentals I

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course provides the basic concepts underlying modern geographic information science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the principles of GIS for collecting, storing, characterizing, and maintaining data and computer-based techniques for processing and analyzing spatial data. The course includes three hours of lecture, in class exercises and homework projects each week. This is a computer based class with the majority of students work involving GIS computer software. Prerequisite: working knowledge of spreadsheet software

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6182330Timothy ButchartOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as GEO 513/GSS 513 and GSS 313

  • GER 101: Intensive Elementary German

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An intensive course covering the elementary German program (GER 111, 112) in one semester. GER 101 is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of German in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take this course without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after GER 111 or any other course in German.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16271130Nicholas BetsonOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as GER101/112/592 Synchronous online

  • GER 112: Elementary German II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in GER 111 or placement into 112. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/l lrc/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An introduction to spoken and written German, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, and culture. The course consists of four hours in a small section conducted in German, and one laboratory hour.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16271230Nicholas BetsonOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as GER101/112/592 Synchronous online

  • GER 592: Language Acquisition II

    Graduate 1-4 credits

    GER 591

    Elementary German II intended for graduate students from other programs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16271330Nicholas BetsonOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as GER101/112/592 Synchronous online

  • GLI 102: Academy of Civic Life

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor

    SBC: USA

    Explores foundational texts related to civics and democracy. Students will read modern and classical texts exploring Citizenship, Labor, Representation, Justice, and Activism. Through classroom debates and writing assignments, students will examine how these historical texts and foundational ideas impact current events and their personal communities. To supplement the readings, students will also be exposed to a range of relevant media including art, film, journalism, and new media.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26572201Tracey WaltersIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:45PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Teagle High School Students Only

  • GLI 212: Issues in Globalization

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: GLO; HUM

    Issues on Globalization Studies such as: Global Cities and Urbanization Processes; Global Diasporas and Ethnicities; Global Development and Sustainability; Cultural and Political Representation in a Global Context; Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context; Global Corporations, Institutions, and Policies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16536331Global Gender/Race/Class Sophia BoutilierOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26583532Terrorism And Global Security Cheryl HegeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • GLI 391: HFA Topics in Globalization

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. G or HUM course

    SBC: GLO; HFA+

    Topics in the Humanities and Fine Arts that are connected with Global Issues such as: Global Cities and Urbanization Processes; Global Diasporas and Ethnicities; Global Development and Sustainability; Cultural and Political Representation in a Global Context; Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context; Global Corporations, Institutions, and Policies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16358230Urbanism After Covid Phillip BaldwinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26594621Urbanism After Covid Phillip BaldwinIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - ITALY

    Session 26583631International Grant Writing Phillip BaldwinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • GLI 392: SBS Topics in Globalization

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    SBC: GLO; SBS+

    Topics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences that are connected with Global Issues such as: Global Cities and Urbanization Processes; Global Diasporas and Ethnicities; Global Development and Sustainability; Cultural and Political Representation in a Global Context; Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context; Global Corporations, Institutions, and Policies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16584401Beyond Sustainable Development TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 16584401Beyond Sustainable Development Juliette PasserOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday07:00-09:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26531802Global Human Rights TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26531802Global Human Rights Juliette PasserOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday07:00-09:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • GSS 313: GIS Design and Application I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: MAT 125 or MAT 131 or AMS 151 or instructor consent Corequisite: GSS 314

    SBC: TECH

    Provides the basic concepts underlying modern geographic information science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the principles of GIS for characterizing environmental systems and computer-based techniques for processing and analyzing spatial data. The course is three credit hours of lecture. This lecture course must be taken in the same semester as the associated laboratory, GSS 314. Not for credit in addition to GSS 317.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6185730Timothy ButchartOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as GSS 313/GSS 513 and GEO 513 GSS 313 co-req required of GSS 314 must be taken together.

  • GSS 314: GIS Laboratory

    Undergraduate 1 credit

    Corequisite: GSS 313

    Practice using the GIS techniques and tools learned in the lecture (GSS 313), work on exercises, and process and analyze the spatial data for the course project. This laboratory course must be taken in the same semester as GSS 313.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended61856L30Timothy ButchartOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: GSS 314 must be taken with co req GSS 313, class meets online.

  • GSS 513: GIS Fundamentals I

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course provides the basic concepts underlying modern geographic information science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the principles of GIS for collecting, storing, characterizing, and maintaining data and computer-based techniques for processing and analyzing spatial data. The course includes three hours of lecture, in class exercises and homework projects each week. This is a computer based class with the majority of students work involving GIS computer software. Prerequisite: working knowledge of spreadsheet software

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 1 Extended6185830Timothy ButchartOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as GSS 513/GSS 313 and GEO 513

  • HAL 375: Supplement Use Sport Perform

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: Completion of Any Undergraduate Biology Course or Equivalent

    Course introduces the use of supplements in sport from a sports medicine and athletic training perspective. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using dietary supplements. Presents scientific research on recommended dosage and potential side effects. Both competitive and recreational athletes' needs and concerns are addressed. Upon completion of course, students should be able to evaluate and make recommendations about dietary supplements. Open to west campus students. G/P/NC grading option is not available. Prerequisite: Completion of Any Undergraduate Biology Course or Equivalent

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16590801TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open +
    ×

    Note: Open to Non-HSC students.

    Session 26590901TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open +
    ×

    Note: Open to Non-HSC students.

  • HAL 376: Introduction to Nutrition

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Introduces students to fundamentals of nutritional science and food systems. Reviews dietary sources and functions of macro and micronutrients and the basic of their metabolism and impact on energy balance and common health problems. Explores types of food systems, including production, transformation, distribution, access and consumption and Explores the impact on the environment and human health. Discusses contemporary issues and controversies such as eating disorders, diet trends and sports nutrition. Open to west campus students. G/P/NC grading option is not available.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16327201Kristen MitchellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Open to Non-HSC students.

    Session 26509201Kristen MitchellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Open to Non-HSC students.

  • HAL 515: Foundtns of Athletic Training

    Graduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Introduces the student to athletic training and the role of the athletic trainer. Topics include the historical development of the profession, concept of the sports medicine team, and injury documentation. Emphasizes strategies for injury prevention, assessment, and treatment. Focuses instruction on the recognition and management of medical emergencies, training and conditioning techniques, and the fabrication and application of taping, wrapping, supportive, and protective devices.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16327801Kathryn KoshanskyIn PersonMon. & Weds.08:00-11:30AMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 163279L01TBAIn PersonMon. & Weds.11:30-02:00PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HAL 520: Principles of Physical Agents

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Introduces the use of therapeutic interventions to manage a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Emphasizes an evidence-based practice approach to making sound clinical decisions for the use of therapeutic modalities. Topics include tissue response to injury, pain physiology, psychological response to injury, and therapeutic interventions for inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16328001Lisa KomnikIn PersonTues. & Thurs.02:00-04:30PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 163281L01Lisa KomnikIn PersonTues. & Thurs.05:00-07:30PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HAL 525: Evidence Based Practice

    Graduate 1 credit

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Introduces concepts of evidence based practice (EBP) in athletic training. The student will learn how to obtain, process, examine, and appraise peer reviewed journal articles. The students will become a consumer of literature and form a foundation for clinical practice as well as identifying areas of interest for future research projects through literature searches and round table discussions of literature.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16328230Kevin BrandtOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HAL 535: Clin Diagnosis & Treatment I

    Graduate 5 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Focuses on the principles of clinical diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic injuries to the lower extremity. Emphasizes the components of the comprehensive orthopedic clinical evaluation and diagnosis including history, inspection, palpation, functional testing, special evaluation techniques, and the establishment and implementation of therapeutic interventions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26509701Xristos GagliasIn PersonTues. & Thurs.08:00-10:30AMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26509701TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.11:30-02:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265098L01Xristos GagliasIn PersonWednesday08:00-01:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HAL 550: Advncd Therapeutic Intrventns

    Graduate 5 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Progression of previously learned therapeutic interventions. Emphasizes the use of therapeutic exercise and manual therapy techniques in order to rehabilitate patients from both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic conditions. Prerequisite: Year 1 Spring Courses

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16328601Samantha CarusoIn PersonTues. & Thurs.08:00-10:30AMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 16328601TBAIn PersonTues. & Thurs.11:30-02:00PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 163285L01Samantha CarusoIn PersonFriday08:00-01:00PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HAL 555: Healthcare Mgmt Athletic Trng

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Provides students with the ability to analyze various issues, policies, and procedures encompassing the ethical administration of athletic training in a managed-care model. Includes US federal healthcare laws, legal liability, issues, personnel management, facility organization and design, equipment maintenance, budgeting, record keeping, health care services, informatics, counseling, and public relations. Exposes students to principles that enhance their networking, professional development, and personal branding skills. Prerequisite: Year 1 Spring Courses

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26509901Aimee BrunelleOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HAL 570: Research Mthds Athletic Trng

    Graduate 2 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Athletic Training Program (HALMS)

    Introduces the student to research in athletic training. Includes the research process, read, examine, and comprehend peer reviewed journal articles. Students will begin assembling a research project on a topic related to athletic training through the development of a research question and the composition of a literature review and methodology based on their proposed topic. The culmination of this course will result in submission of an application to the IRB. Prerequisite: Year 1 Spring Courses

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16328401Sharon MartinoIn PersonWednesday09:30-12:00PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 16328401TBAIn PersonWednesday12:30-03:00PMHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HEA 502: College Stdnt Development Thry

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    This course examines the major theoretical constructs that inform practitioners who work with college students. Topics will include moral and ethical development, emotional maturation and identity formation, as well as the link between student persistence and involvement. Students will gain an understanding of psychosocial/affective, cognitive, typological and person/ environment interaction theories. Formerly CEK 502.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65435S30Stephanie FooteOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 503: Leadership in Higher Education

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    Colleges and universities are unique institutions. Although they seem to increasingly resemble the complex organizations typically found in business and public administration, their special missions of teaching, research and service put them in a singular category where ¿collegiality¿ and university traditions of academic freedom introduce powerful cross-currents of equality. This course explores collegiate leadership, from the lofty heights of the presidency to the more mundane challenges faced by managers at all levels, be they in academic or administrative units. Students will become familiar with the myths and realities of leadership, as presented in the literature, and conduct their own leadership studies. Formerly CEK 503.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65466S30Marilyn LondonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 504: Research&Assessment Higher Ed

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    This course introduces assessment and program evaluation in colleges and universities. With increasingly difficult, diverse, and complex decision-making circumstances, it is essential that professionals examine assessment techniques and how these strategies may be best employed to benefit organizations and ultimately their stakeholders. Higher education (like other organizations) must use evidence for planning and linking programs, evaluating and assessing program results, and improving programs based on evaluation data. Assignments will emphasize how to perform effective, high quality assessment and program evaluations. Formerly CEK 504.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65436S30Elsa-Sofia MoroteOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 510: Technology in Higher Education

    Graduate 3 credits

    An exploration of new and innovative technologies in higher education, and their impact on student learning, engagement, and motivation. Higher education is impacted by technology on an ever changing scale. Students will learn about best practices in higher education, including several web based productivity and course management tools, cyber-ethics and digital footprint, organization of the digital world, collaborating with technology, social media, virtual worlds as well as presentation strategies and tools. The culminating project is the research, assessment, analysis, and presentation of a college student technology profile.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65471S30Albert PisanoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 520: Advising/Counseling Higher Ed

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    This course is an introduction to advising and counseling in higher education. Course topics include advising and student development theory; advising structures for effective learning, teaching, and mentoring; legal issues in advising; advising methods and best practices; key stakeholders in advising; and articulating a personal advising philosophy. Formerly CEK 520

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65438S30Elizabeth SquireOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 521: Diversity and Higher Education

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    This course examines diversity in institutions of higher education from both a theoretical and historical framework. It will provide a foundation for examining policy and practice by the study of key concepts in human diversity, legislation and case studies. Best practice assessment methods are explored within the context of multicultural pedagogy. Formerly CEK 521.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65474S30Frank ShihOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 522: Crisis Mgt/Prevention High Ed

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    This course will explore the critical role that student safety and effective institutional management of student crises play in the academic and social success of students. Risk factors such as mental health issues, alcohol and other drug use, and violence will be examined, as well as protective factors such as sense of belonging/community, health and wellness, and self-efficacy. Course participants will become familiar with latest best practices in institutional strategies to creating a safe environment for learning. (Formerly CEK 522.)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65439S30Thomas McDonaldOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 525: The Contemporary Undergraduate

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    An in-depth examination of lifestyle, attitudes, characteristics and demographics of the contemporary undergraduate college student in the United States. This course offers an overview of the theoretical and research literature on college students in the U.S. from a variety of perspectives, and considers the educational, social, and environmental needs of different student subgroups. Students will explore traditional and non-traditional college populations at two-and four-year institutions. Formerly CEK 525.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65469S30Brian KerrOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 527: Community College Admin

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    A study of the history, philosophy, nature, and administrative functions of the community college in the United States. This course introduces concepts related to the knowledge and skills that will enable a reflective community college administrator to effectively and efficiently navigate the issues associated with administering a community college in the 21st century.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65494S30Charles HarrisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HEA 535: International Higher Education

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: matriculation in Higher Education Administration programs

    This course examines international higher education and the historical, political, cultural and socio-economic evolution differentiating national tertiary systems, regional frameworks, and international cooperation among industrialized, developing, and transitioning countries. Comparative higher education theory, empirical examples, and international organization and government reports are investigated to benchmark system performance, international and global models, and assess quality, standards, accreditation, accountability, and governance shaping sector policy, planning, and reform. Contemporary public-private higher education dichotomy, administration, funding mechanisms, curriculum and organization of degrees, academic profession, and the social stratification impacting higher education access and student mobility in the knowledge economy is explored. (Advisory pre-requisite for Study Abroad HEA programs). Formerly CEK 535.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265881S30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - this class will meet online.

    Session 265881S30Robert PriestOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday06:00-08:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer 2022 - this class will meet online.

  • HEA 595: HEA Project Seminar

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in MA Higher Education Admin degree program; completion of 24 graduate level credits in the degree program; pre/co-req HEA 504

    The goal of the Project Seminar is to teach students to understand and conduct graduate level research. Research may be either original or applied. Prior approval of topic by faculty required; methodology and resources will be reviewed throughout writing process. Effective Fall 2014, this course will be GRADED (A, B, C, F). Effective Summer 2015, successful completion of the Project Seminar requires a grade of "B" or better; otherwise, the course must be repeated in order to graduate. No transfer credit or substitutions. Formerly CEK 595.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65437S30Robert MangioneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online66007S31Richard GatteauOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HFN 500: Survey of Nutrition Concepts

    Graduate 3 credits

    This online course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition science. Dietary sources and functions of macro and micronutrients are reviewed, as well as the basics of their metabolism and their impact on disease prevention, energy balance and common health problems. Prerequisite: Prior Undergraduate or Graduate Physiology course. Department consent required

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338801Leah HolbrookOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HFN 510: Issues and Trends in Nutrition

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program or HFN 500

    This online course will provide an overview of current and emerging issues in food and nutrition including topics that impact nutrition recommendations for patients. Course material will also include trends in health care organizations as it relates to food and nutrition service delivery. Students will explore how these trends may shape patient perceptions of favorable and unfavorable dietary choices, as well as food availability via market trends. Prerequisite: HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26510601Leah HolbrookOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HFN 526: Nuts and Bolts of Nutr Polic

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: HFN 502 or HFN 525

    This online course prepares students to advance population health by theorizing a nutrition or food related policy or program promoting sustainable food systems, and to develop the skills necessary to operationalize such a policy or program. Students will use logic models to conceptualize the policy or program, and develop in-depth monitoring and evaluation strategies. In addition, students will learn to coordinate program planning with budget development so as to create realistic programs. Lastly, students will learn how to display data and seek funding to facilitate initial or continued implementation, or to further policy development. Prerequisite: HFN 502 or HFN 525

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16329801Josephine Connolly-SchoonenOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HFN 530: Nutrition Management & Leader

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to Masters in Nutrition Program (HFNMZ)

    This online course is designed to develop effective management skills in clinical nutrition services. The emphasis will be on the management of clinical services in highly regulated health care settings. Case studies and problem-based learning scenarios will complement online instruction and readings. Personnel issues, cost containment, benchmarking and management principles pertinent to clinical functions will be discussed and applied to real life situations. Accreditation and regulation processes will be covered in depth and the focus will be on the Joint Commission Accreditation process and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Admission to Master of Science in Nutrition Program(HFNMZ)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16329601Lorraine DanowskiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HFN 541: Crit Care & Nutrition Support

    Graduate 3 credits

    Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program's Advanced Nutrition Therapy and Critical Care Concentration and HFN 516

    This online course will explore the role and impact of medical nutrition therapy in the critical care setting and its influence on patient outcomes. This will include the assessment of specific patient-populations such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), burns, continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD), sedated/intubated patients, and traumatic brain injuries (TBI). The impact of preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative feeding strategies will be discussed as well as potential pros and cons of immune enhancing supplements. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program's Advanced Nutrition Therapy and Critical Care Concentration and HFN 516

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16329701Mindy FreudenbergOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HFN 552: Case-Based Approaches to Integ

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program's Integrative Nutrition Therapy Concentration and HFN 514.

    During this online course students will apply the concepts of integrative nutrition, as well as material in other clinically relevant courses, to a variety of complex clinical cases. Case study assignments will include detailed assessment strategies and care plans to include dietary intake and supplementation, as well as appropriate monitoring and evaluation techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program's Integrative Nutrition Therapy Concentration and HFN 514.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338901Karen GrahamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HFN 578: Appl of Nutrition Rsrch Litert

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: Admission to Masters in Nutrition Program (HFNMZ) and HFN 575

    This online course will facilitate development of the critical thinking skills necessary to become efficient consumers of nutrition-related research presented in the scientific literature and popular media. Students will learn to interpret current nutrition research by performing effective literature searches for nutrition research articles, recognizing the strengths and limitations of the research methods, and evaluating the quality of nutrition information in both the scientific literature and popular media. This course will begin with an overview of the challenges facing health professionals when delivering nutrition education to the layperson. Challenges to be discussed include media misrepresentation, health illiteracy and a Prerequisites: Admission to Masters in Nutrition Program (HFNMZ) and HFN 575

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16329501Annemarie NgOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

    Session 26510701Sotiria EverettOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
    ×

  • HIS 116: Women as a Force in US History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K&4 SBC: SBS; USA

    Surveys the history of women and gender in the United States from 1900 to the present. The course focuses on three kinds of changes: in women's work and the gendered division of labor; in relationships between gender, politics, and the state; and the rise of consumer and mass cultures. Students will read what historians and other scholars have written about women and analyze historians' sources in the form of documents and images. We will pay particular attention to differences among women in such areas as race and ethnicity, class, religion, and sexuality. Students should acquire a deeper understanding of the forces influencing women's lives and gender norms and a better appreciation of how women and gender have shaped the history of the United States.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26566730Bonnie SoperOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 214: Modern Latin America

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; SBS

    An introduction to the major themes in the history of modern Latin America, from the early nineteenth century to the present. Students will gain a deeper understanding of some of the central historical themes that have shaped Latin American society and politics since achieving independence, thus providing the basis for making sound observations and judgments about the political, economic, social, and cultural realities affecting Latin America today. The class advances chronologically as well as thematically, covering topics such as nationalism, political economy, U.S.-Latin American relations, revolutionary & counterrevolutionary struggle, and cultural practices. Lectures approach the hemisphere comparatively, drawing similarities and differences between different nation-states and regions. This course is offered as both HIS 214 and POL 214.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26355630Giovanni BelloOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: HIS 214 and POL 214 meet together

  • HIS 216: History of US-Latin Am Relatns

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; SBS

    An examination of the impact of U.S. economic and political relations with Latin America from the mid-19th century to the present. The course considers changes in American policy toward Latin America, as well as the varying responses of Latin American nations to U.S. intervention and influence. This course is offered as both HIS 216 and POL 216.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16533130Adrian MarquezOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: HIS 216 and POL 216 meet together

  • HIS 237: Sci, Tech, Med in West Civ I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An examination of science, technology, medicine, and their social organization from 1450-1790 (from the Renaissance to the French Revolution) and the origin of those systems in Western cultures. Among the topics covered are experimentation and mathematics, funding of technological development by the state, organizations of scientists, the place of science and technology in cultural life, industrialization, and the character and organization of medical practice.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16533201Brooke FranksOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 238: Sci, Tech, Med in West Civ II

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An examination of science, technology, medicine, and their social organization from 1790 to the present (from the French Revolution to the end of the Cold War) and the development of these systems world wide. Among the topics covered are professionalization of medicine, implications of physics for defense industries, growth of biotechnology, and the impact of Darwinism on culture.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26566230Cody RosslerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 248: Modern Europe, 1815-1914

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: I SBC: GLO

    European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of the First World War, with emphasis on political and social developments, but also including economic and cultural trends.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16562501Erin ChavezOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 263: Age of the American Revolution

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K&4 SBC: SBS; USA

    The social, economic, and political history of the period 1763-1787, set against the background of the development of colonial society. The course stresses social and economic changes, the causes and results of the Revolution, the formation of new state and national governments, and the first party system.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16533330Lance BoosOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 287: Crime & Criminal Justice U.S.

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F&4 SBC: SBS; USA

    Study of the development of police, courts, prisons, criminal law and crime in the United States from the 17th century to the present. How were the institutions of criminal justice created? How did they change? How have people perceived and responded to crime? Previously offered as HIS 373. Not for credit in addition to HIS 373.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26566330Willie MackOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 300: Topics in Global History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to global history. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16565930Gender Transgressions Jocelyn ZimmermanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26566632History Of Speed Elena-Liliana Mutu-BlackstoneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 302: Environmental History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An exploration of human-caused transformations in natural environments and in ideas about nature from prehistory to the present. Examining topics from agriculture and deforestation in classical antiquity to the Columbian encounter, from problems of environmental management in imperial India to the emergence of environmentalism as a global movement today, the course focuses on case studies from several regions, including the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, New England, and South Asia.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16355730Donal ThomasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 328: History of New York City

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: K&4 SBC: SBS+

    A survey of the evolution of New York City from native American communities, Dutch outpost, British town, American nineteenth through twenty-first century metropolis in the context of cultural diversity, conflict, and the quest for the almighty dollar. The course will develop how the city has both mirrored and shaped national political, economic, social and cultural trends.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16443230Gabriel TennenOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 380: Topics/Latin American History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: J SBC: SBS+

    May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16355530Slavery & Revolution Caribbean Kevin MarshallOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26566430Afro-Latin America Jose BaezaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 396: Topics in US History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: K&4 SBC: SBS+

    Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to American history. With a focus on U.S. history, topics may include the rise of the American corporation in the 19th and 20th centuries; economic history and changing population patterns; and popular music and society. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16562431Myths Of American Colonization Kevin MarshallOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26533432Alternative History In The U.s Kenneth WohlOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HIS 398: Topics in Hist of Sci & Tech

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26566530Rioting & Health Crises Lorna EbnerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HON 401: Global Issues

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: Honors College membership; U3 or higher standing

    SBC: DIV; GLO

    Using historical, geographical, sociological, political, and economic perspectives, students examine global issues. This examination may be either topical or regional and may be oriented either toward the past, the present, or the future.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16322530Global Issues In The 20th Cent Sharon BrownOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Enrollment of at least 10 students needed in order for course to run

    Session 26595220Global Issues In The 20th Cent Tara RiderIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - IRELAND

  • HRM 532: Foundations of Human Resources

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: matriculated in Human Resource Management Programs or Concentrations

    This required course explores the basic elements of personnel administration that includes an overview of human resource functions; recruitment, selection, staffing, and placement; job classification and wage and benefit systems; employee supervision, performance management, workplace health, safety and security, counseling, discipline, and grievance. The legal framework of human resource administration, workplace diversity, and approaches specific to union and nonunion environments is also covered. This course should be taken in your first semester (formerly CES 515).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65483S30Nicole GamarOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 533: Employee Relations/Labor Mgt

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: matriculated in Human Resource Management Programs or Concentrations

    The focal point of this foundation course is the historical development of labor unions in the United States, the evolution of the legal framework governing labor relations today, and the major elements of collective bargaining and dispute resolution techniques used in the private and public sectors. A discussion of the future of organized labor concludes the course. This course is offered as both HRM 533 and MBA 533 (formerly CES 516).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65477S30Catherine FarrellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 537: Employee Learning-Prof Develop

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: matriculated in Human Resource Management Programs or Concentrations

    This course provides an overview of employee learning methods, and includes training design, development, and evaluation procedures in organizations. Emphasis is placed on how to perform a needs analysis, how to select the latest training technologies, and how to apply methodologies to maximize adult learning as well as improve upon organizational development. In addition, employee development strategies are reviewed, i.e., training generalist managers and specialists, how to foster an atmosphere conducive to continuous learning, and how to reward supervisors for encouraging and supporting employee development (formerly Training and Development).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65484S30Nicholas ScalzoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 538: Organizational Devel & Change

    Graduate 3 credits

    Must have HRM 532; Matriculation MS or AGC in HRM or concentration

    This course will acquaint students with types of organizational change and the roles of human resources managers as change agents and internal consultants. Cases, group exercises, and class discussions are used to examine change methods, employees' reactions to change, facilitation techniques, and evaluation methods. Roles of leaders, managers, employees, and human resources professionals are considered. Targets of change include job designs, interpersonal relationships, downsizing/rightsizing and organizational structures. Quality improvement, employee involvement, and professional development are studied as examples of change strategies. Students learn how to help their co-workers cope, as well as how to become trusted business advisors within the organization. This course is offered as both HRM 538 and MBA 538 (formerly CEX 538). Prerequisite: MBA 532/HRM 532.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65459S30Dan GreenOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 541: Human Relations/Workforce Plan

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: matriculated in Human Resource Management Programs or Concentrations

    Organizations, both today and in the future, look for employees, managers, and leaders who possess a significant understanding of the principles and practices of human relations and organizational behavior in the workplace. Given the value of human capital in our ever-changing global economy, the strategic impact that human resource leaders have on their organizations has never been more important. This course explores the modalities of human relations in the workplace, explains and applies employment laws that govern human relations and workforce planning, and applies innovative workplace solutions and programs to aid leaders so they can retain and engage a productive and high functioning workforce. (Formerly CES 511)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65461S30Leigh MulliganOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 545: Employment Law and Policy

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: HRM 533; Matriculation MS or AGC in HRM or concentration

    This course is designed to give business and HR professionals insight into and practical knowledge of the various legal issues that inform today's employer-employee relationships. Topics will include workplace safety and health, ethics, managing diversity and hiring practices, formation of the employment contract, laws governing the work relationship, investigation protocols and risk-reduction techniques, viewed against a backdrop of emerging employment trends. (formerly CES 525).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65460S30Douglas SilvermanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65487S31James WilsonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65488S32Douglas SilvermanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 546: JobEvaluation/CompSys/Benefits

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: HRM 532; Matriculation MS or AGC in HRM or concentration

    An advanced course providing students with both theory and specific knowledge of job evaluation and compensation systems. Topics include comparable worth and legal requirements: preparation of job evaluation and job design, fringe benefits, pensions, social security, theory of compensation systems as they relate to job satisfaction and employee morale; development of wage and salary surveys, internal and external equity pay scales, performance-based pay systems, and salary administration procedures. An analysis of incentives-bonuses, stock options, salary deferrals and special benefits-will complete the course. Prerequisite: HRM 532 (formerly CES 526).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65476S30Dianne WeinsteinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65489S31William LigganOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 547: Performance Management in Org

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: matriculated in Human Resource Management Programs or Concentrations

    This course provides insight to the importance of performance management and the behavior of individuals and teams in organizations. Emphasis will be placed on implications for effective human resource management, and the need to align organizational goals with performance management practices. Approaches used to drive performance and analyze problems encountered in managing human resources will be discussed throughout the course. Additional topics include performance appraisal, individual and group decision-making skills, recruitment, selection, and employee orientation, employee ability, motivation and incentive systems, job satisfaction, retention, and employee engagement.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65462S30Sayeedul IslamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 548: Diversity/Global Issues @ Work

    Graduate 3 credits

    Pre-requisite: HRM 532 or HRM 541; Matriculation MS/AGC in HRM or concentration

    This course examines contemporary practices and trends in the global marketplace. Topics include both the similarities and differences among people, organizations, and management across sectoral and national boundaries that must be a part of the knowledge base of tomorrow's human resource manager. Human resources from a global perspective, including issues for expatriates and repatriation, the European Union, health and safety, business ethics, employee benefits and unions will be covered. Additional emphasis will be placed on understanding how differences among multinational corporations, governmental regulatory agencies, public authorities, strategic alliances, political and cultural environments impact the management of human resources.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65463S30Michael CarrOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65490S31Veronica JoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 551: HR BusinessAcumen/DataAnalytic

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: HRM 532 and HRM 533, and Matriculation in HRM program

    For students working in human resources (HR) management or a related field, this course will provide an understanding of the importance of learning an organization's operations and functions as well as its competitive environment/landscape. The course will specifically review human resources data analytics, a key component to creating the case for human resources projects and other decisions they may have to make in the course of being a HR professional. Students will develop a comprehensive human resources business case.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65709S30Steven RiccobonoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HRM 595: Strategic Human Resources Proj

    Graduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MS or AGC in HRM; prior completion of 24 graduate HRM credits.

    This is an advanced course, designed to examine and research new developments and professional concerns in human resource management. The course focuses on such topics as strategic human resource management, productivity in the American workplace; developing union/management cooperation for productivity; methods of employee learning in the workplace; metrics and measurement in human resources; and specialized needs of the new workforce in a high-tech and service economy. Students will be guided through professionally oriented activities designed to provide them with culminating experiences that result in a research project and final paper. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Pre-requisite: completion of 24 credits of HRM coursework. Effective Summer 2015, successful completion of the Project Seminar requires a grade of "B" or better; otherwise, the course must be repeated in order to graduate. No transfer credit or substitutions (replaces CED 595).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65470S31Leo GiglioOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

    SPD Online65497S32Gary BodamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • HUI 239: Modern Italy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: I SBC: GLO; HUM

    A survey of contemporary Italy and its political, social, and economic structure, as well as the study of cultural life and institutions, within the context of its historical development, with comparisons to American models and standards.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16589301Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HUR 241: Russian Cinema

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    Survey of major developments in Societ and Russian cinema extending from the groundbreaking innovations of Soviet montage to the popular cinema of the post-communist period. Emphasis on situating the works of, among others, Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, Muratova, Balabanov within the context of Russia's tumultuous history and its distinct cultural traditions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163593L30TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 163593L30Anna GeisherikOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.02:00-03:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HUS 272: Science Tech Enviro in LatinAm

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: CER; STAS

    Studies the dialogues between scientific and literary discourses in Latin America, discussing the ethics and responsibility of dealing with our current environmental emergency. Special focus will be on cultural and literary interventions in the debates about sustainability, infrastructure, climate change, and global warming, and on the place that the discourses of science and technology have played in them.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26565130Mario HenaoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • HUS 290: Latin American Cinema

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: ARTS; DIV; GLO

    A contextual introductory approach to the national cinemas of Latin America and their local politics in a global context. Students develop skills in film analysis and examine performance techniques and visual languages, while studying cinema in relation to national identity, the self, and the function of culture in society. Formerly offered as HUS 390; not for credit in addition to HUS 390.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16338130Loreto BarrancoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • IEC 103: Intensive Intermediate EGL

    Undergraduate 0-15 credits

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26534601TBAIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:00-02:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26583202Maurice WilliamsIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:00-02:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26583130Christina GrilloOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.08:00-02:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • IEC 104: Intensive High Intermed EGL

    Undergraduate 0-15 credits

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26583401Christina GrilloIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:00-02:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26583302Margaret SobelIn PersonMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:00-02:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 26502130TBAOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.08:00-02:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online Permission of department and placement exam required

  • ISE 218: Fundamentals of IT

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Level 4 or higher on the mathematics placement examination or a grade of C or better i n MAT 123 or higher

    This course introduces the fundamentals of Information Technology (IT) to students interested in the relationship between computer hardware, software, networks, and information systems. The course examines components found in high use computing devices such as desktop computers, smart phones, and navigation systems. The focus of the examination is understanding the underlying technology of each component, along with price/performance curves and competing technologies. Upon completion of the course, students should be proficient in reading device specifications, particularly functional and performance implications. Students should also be able to use that knowledge to compare competing devices.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16321330Ali RazaOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Thurs.06:00-08:15PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online

  • ISE 300: Technical Communications

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: WRT 102, CSE or ISE major, U3 or U4 standing

    SBC: SPK; WRTD

    Principles of professional technical communications for Computer Science and Information Systems majors. Topics include writing business communications, user manuals, press releases, literature reviews, and research abstracts. Persuasive oral communications and effective presentation techniques, to address a range of audiences, will also be covered. This course satisfies the upper-division writing requirement for CSE and ISE majors.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16320130Richard McKennaOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CSE 300 and ISE 300

  • ISE 305: Database Design and Practice

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ISE 208 or CSE 114 or CSE 230

    SBC: EXP+; TECH

    The design of database applications including Entity-Relationship data modeling, the relational data model, the SQL database query language, application development, and database administration. Students will complete a project that includes designing a database application and implementing it using database development tools.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319030Praveen TripathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ISE 305 and ISE 503

  • ISE 312: Legal Issues in Info Systems

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: CSE or ISE major; U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

    SBC: CER; ESI; STAS

    This course deals with the impact of computers on us as individuals and on our society. Rapid changes in computing technology and in our use of that technology have changed the ways we work, play, and interact with other people. These changes have created a flood of new social, legal and ethical issues that demand critical examination. This course is offered as both CSE 312 and ISE 312.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26532331Ali RazaOnline SynchronousMon., Weds., Thurs.06:00-08:15PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as CSE 312 and ISE 312

  • ISE 503: Data Management

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course provides an understanding of the issues in managing database systems as an essential organizational resource. Students learn the enterprise data architecture components, data storage configurations, and information retrieval methods. It expands from the relational model to the multidimensional model, object-relational techniques, and web accessed data. The course includes concepts, principles, issues, and techniques for managing corporate data resources. Techniques for managing the design and development of large database systems including logical data models, concurrent processing, data distribution, database administration, data warehousing, data cleansing, and data mining. Students will use current methods and tools for database design and development. Limited to CSE/ISE graduate students; others, permission of instructor.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16319230Praveen TripathiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ISE 305 and ISE 503

  • ITL 101: Intensive Elementary Italian

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An intensive course covering the elementary Italian program (ITL 111, 112) in one semester. ITL 101 is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Italian in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take this course without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after any other course in Italian.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16206230Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 101/ITL 112 and ITL 592 Synchronous online.

    Session 26446030Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 101/ITL 112 and ITL 592 Synchronous online.

  • ITL 112: Elementary Italian II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in ITL 111 or placement into 112. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ll rc/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An introduction to spoken and written Italian, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Selected texts are read. Practice in language laboratory supplements class work. May not be taken for credit in addition to ITL 101.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16244530Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 112/ITL 101 and ITL 592. Synchronous online. Students enrolled in ITL 112 take only the second half of the course. Meeting dates TBA.

    Session 26446130Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 112/ITL 101 and ITL 592. Synchronous online. Students enrolled in ITL 112 take only the second half of the course.

  • ITL 201: Intensive Intermediate Italian

    Undergraduate 6 credits

    Prerequisite: ITL 101 or 112 or placement into 201 or 211. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/llr c/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: GLO; HUM; LANG

    An intensive course covering the intermediate Italian program (ITL 211, 212) in one semester. May not be taken for credit in addition to ITL 211, 212.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26379930Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 201 and ITL 212 Synchronous online

  • ITL 212: Intermediate Italian 2

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: ITL 211 or placement into 212. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/llrc/placement_ch allenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: GLO; HUM; LANG

    Development of functional competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture in interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Emphasis on comparison of languages and cultures and on the use of the Italian language in communities both within and beyond the university setting. Study and discussion of cultures in the Italian speaking world through film, literature, music, newspapers. May not be taken for credit in addition to ITL 201.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26383730Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 212 and ITL 201. Synchronous online. Students enrolled in ITL 212 take only the second half of the course. Meeting dates TBA.

  • ITL 592: Language Acquisition II

    Graduate 1-4 credits

    ITL 591

    Elementary Italian II intended for graduate students from other programs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16244630Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 592/ITL 101 and ITL 112. Synchronous online. Students enrolled in ITL 592 take only the second half of the course. Meeting dates TBA.

    Session 26446230Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousMon., Tues., Weds., Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as ITL 592/ITL 101 and ITL 112. Synchronous online. Students enrolled in ITL 592 take only the second half of the course.

  • JPN 111: Elementary Japanese I

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    An introduction to spoken and written Japanese with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Linguistic analysis of the characters provides cultural and historical background of the language. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Japanese in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take JPN 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16269030Yasuko FujitaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • JPN 112: Elementary Japanese II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in JPN 111 or placement into 112. See http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ll rc/placement_challenge_exams/placement_exam.html for more information.

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An introduction to spoken and written Japanese with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Linguistic analysis of the characters provides cultural and historical background of the language. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Japanese in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take JPN 112 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26444630Chikako NakamuraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • JRN 101: News Literacy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Pre- or corequisite: WRT 101 or higher or equivalent, or permission of department

    DEC: B SBC: CER; SBS

    How do you know if you're getting the truth from the news media? This course is designed to prepare students to become more discriminating news consumers. It will examine standards of reliability and accuracy in news gathering and presentation, and seek to establish the differences between news and propaganda, assertion and verification, bias and fairness, and infotainment and journalism. Students will be encouraged to critically examine news broadcasts, newspaper articles and websites. Visiting journalists will be questioned about the journalistic process and decision making.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26500730Jonathan AnzaloneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 265008R30Jonathan AnzaloneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • JRN 106: Introduction to Mass Media

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Communication Major or Minor

    SBC: SBS; USA

    A survey of the historical evolution, content, and structural elements of mass media. This introduction to social science research approaches to the study of mass communication enables participants to understand mass media's political, economic, social, psychological influences on individuals and broader U.S. society. Students examine the effect and impacts of mass communication on contemporary society and consider how global media influence and are influenced by U.S. media. This course is offered as both JRN 106 and COM 106.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26537630Christina SanInocencioOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Seats reserved for Major/Minor

  • JRN 303: Global Issues in Journalism

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    JRN Maj/Min: U3 or U4

    SBC: DIV; GLO

    A study of global journalism of the 20th and 21st centuries, as it has been defined by the central topics of these times: mass migration, global warming, and the destruction of natural ecosystems; reparations, indigenous issues, and the advancement of global corporate media. This course studies the role of global journalism as opposed to mainstream American journalism and media, in the configuration of a media agenda and an image of the global society.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26581430Mirjana PanticOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.09:30-10:50AMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • JRN 305: Mass Communication Law &Ethics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    JRN Maj/Min: U3 or U4

    Provides students with a model by which they can analyze, understand, and act upon the law and ethical considerations that journalists and mass media professionals and consumers face in the 21st century. The class will use case studies, the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, the First Amendment Handbook from the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press, and current newsworthy stories to build an analytical model. This course is offered as both JRN 305 and COM 305

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26501230Richard RicioppoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • JRN 365: Talking Science

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SPK

    Designed to help undergraduate students in the sciences communicate effectively and responsively with multiple audiences, from peers and professors to potential employers and the media. Rather than a bag of tricks and techniques, this course will push a shift in the students' understanding of communication: 1) audience centered, 2) goal oriented, and 3) dynamic. Improvisational theatre exercises will help students connect with an audience, pay close and dynamic attention to others, read non-verbal cues, and respond freely without self-consciousness. There will be a strong focus on storytelling as a medium through which this communication shift occurs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163580S30Louisa JohnsonOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • JRN 501: Science Comm I

    Graduate 1 credit

    In this team-taught, immersive science communication training, students will build skills to passionately communicate in a way that excites, engages, and encourages audiences to want to learn more about their work. Improvisational theater-based techniques are combined with message design strategies like distilling and storytelling, enabling healthcare professionals, scientists, and researchers to use strategy and spontaneity to execute powerful communication in any context.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265352S01Nancee MoesIn PersonMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Summer II: This class meets IN-PERSON Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30 am-12:55 pm August 2, 4, 9, and 11

  • JRN 565: Communicating Your Science

    Graduate 3 credits

    Learning to communicate one's research is as important as learning to do the research. This course is designed to help graduate students in the sciences learn to communicate effectively with multiple audiences, from peers and professors to potential employers, journalists, and family members. It builds on science communication research and is designed to help students communicate clearly and vividly. They will develop skills that are central to oral and written communication on any subject. Among the techniques applied are improvisational theater exercises that will help connect with an audience, pay close and dynamic attention to others, read nonverbal cues, respond freely and work through nerves and self-consciousness. For permission to enroll, please contact: aldacenter@stonybrook.edu

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 265819S01TBAIn PersonMon. & Weds.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • KOR 332: HumanitiesTopics:KoreanStudies

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    An investigation of a specific area of Korean studies in the humanities. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16590630Korean-American Art Amy KahngOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 101: Human Language

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS; SNW

    An introduction to the fundamental areas and concepts of modern linguistics. Sounds and their structure, word structure, and sentence structure are discussed. Other topics may include historical linguistics (how languages change over time), dialects, writing systems, language and the brain, and psycholinguistics (especially the question of how children acquire a language).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16222230John StormentOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: offered as LIN 101 and LIN 530

    Session 26598605John BailynIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - Virtual NYI

  • LIN 110: The Anatomy of English Words

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS

    An introduction to the analysis of complex words in English, especially those based on Latin and Greek models that comprise the majority of the vocabulary in the written language. Students will be introduced to Latin and Greek roots and the processes by which complex words are built by affixing material to these roots and modifying their structure. Students will acquire general analytical tools that will allow them to understand complex words that they may not have previously encountered. The course will introduce students to principles of linguistic morphology that extend beyond English to all human languages.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16337730TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 200: Language in the United States

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS; USA

    Survey of the languages and language-related issues in the United States. Topics include Native American languages; immigrant languages; dialectal variations (e.g., Black English); the domains in which these languages were and are used; maintenance and loss of minority languages; language contact and its effects; the use of Spanish; language attitudes and politics is including bilingual education; and official language movements. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of American English from colonial times to its present world-wide status; the use and impact of Spanish; language attitudes and politics including bilingual education; and official language movements.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26368030Veronica MiattoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 307: Sociolinguistics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

    DEC: K SBC: ESI; SBS+

    An examination of the interaction between language and society, focusing on diversity in American English as it relates to differences in gender, geography, social class, ethnicity, and national origin. Study of the development of dialects including African-American Vernacular English, and pidgins and creoles such as Hawiian Pidgin English and Chinook Trade Jargon, within the context of historical developments in the U.S. from colonial times to the present.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26424130Rachel ChristensenOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 307 and LIN 542

  • LIN 320: English Grammar

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

    This course is a systematic survey of English grammar: its major structures, their interaction, and their use. It will also briefly examine some related areas connected to writing like punctuation and spelling.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16341230Andrija PetrovicOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 320 and LIN 527

  • LIN 344: Literacy Development

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Admission to a teacher education program

    An introduction to the theories of literacy and their application in education. Students acquire knowledge about the complex nature of academic literacy; how literacy skills can be taught and assessed across all disciplines, and how literacy and language skills develop among diverse learners, including students with special needs and English Language Learners. Attention is given to the integration of technology into the development of literacy skills. Not for major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26368601TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 344, LIN 544, and CEE 594

    Session 26368601Grace WivellOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 344, LIN 544, and CEE 594

  • LIN 380: Anatomy/Physiology of Speech

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

    SBC: STEM+

    A study of the anatomy and physiology of the speech, swallowing, and hearing mechanisms, including the phonatory, articulatory, respiratory, and resonatory subsystems and the neural control.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16270930Lisa TafuroOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered online. Virtual attendance required.

  • LIN 381: Language and Speech Disorders

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101 and LIN 201

    SBC: STEM+

    Overview of developmental and acquired communication disorders across the lifespan, including language delay, developmental apraxia of speech, phonological disorders, stuttering, acquired aphasia, craniofacial anomalies, and voice disorders.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26520730Grace LeeOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 382: Audiology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101 and LIN 201

    SBC: STEM+

    Survey of the field of audiology, including the physics of sound, the physiology of hearing, the nature and causes of hearing impairment.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16563030TBAOnline/In Person - HybridWednesday05:30-09:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

    Session 16563030Joseph HoffmanOnline/In Person - HybridMonday05:30-09:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 405: Writing in Linguistics

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Prerequisites: permission of department; major in linguistics; U3 or U4 standing

    SBC: ESI; WRTD

    Majors in linguistics refine their skills in writing for the discipline by critiquing successive revisions of previously written work. Formerly offered as LIN 300. Not for credit in addition to LIN 300.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 162427S30Chia-Chi YuOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-03:45PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 425: Topics in Linguistics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisite: Varies with subject matter

    Seminars for advanced linguistics students. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26542202Spec Topics In Lin John BailynIn PersonHours to be arrangedTBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Study Abroad students only - Virtual NYI

  • LIN 522: Phonetics

    Graduate 3 credits

    Enrollment in TESOL, CML, or LIN program, or permission of instructor, and co- or pre-requisite of L IN 530

    A study of articulatory phonetics and the international phonetic alphabet, with intensive practice in phonetic transcription from a wide variety of languages. Acoustic phonetics, speech perception, and the applications of phonetics to foreign language teaching. Prerequisite: Enrollment in TESOL or LIN program or permission of instructor

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26563130Scott NelsonOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.01:30-05:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LIN 527: Structure of English

    Graduate 3 credits

    Enrollment in TESOL, CML, or LIN program, or permission of instructor, and co- or pre-requisite of L IN 530

    A description of the major sentence elements, subsystems, and productive grammatical processes of English. The justification of grammatical categories, interaction between systems and processes, and notions of standard and correctness are discussed with a view to their application in the ESL classroom. Prerequisite: Enrollment in TESOL or LIN program or permission of instructor

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16341330Andrija PetrovicOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 320 and LIN 527

  • LIN 530: Intro to General Linguistics

    Graduate 3 credits

    Enrollment in TESOL, CML, or LIN program or permission of instructor

    An introduction to modern theoretical and applied linguistics, including phonology, morphology, syntax, language acquisition, historical linguistics, and sociolinguistics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in TESOL or LIN program or permission of instructor

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 16247330John StormentOnline SynchronousMon. & Weds.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: offered as LIN 101 and LIN 530

  • LIN 542: Sociolinguistics

    Graduate 3 credits

    Enrollment in TESOL, CML, or LIN program, or permission of instructor, and co- or pre-requisite of L IN 530

    An introduction to major topics in sociolinguistics, including variation theory, language attitudes, language planning, language change, and pidgins and creoles. Prerequisite: Enrollment in TESOL or LIN program or permission of instructor

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26424230Rachel ChristensenOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 307 and LIN 542

  • LIN 544: Lang Acquisition and Liter Dev

    Graduate 3 credits

    In-depth exploration of the theories of literacy and language development of native English speakers and students who are English language learners pre-school through grade 12. The development and assessment of literacy skills among children at various stages of learning development and across disciplines will be examined. Attention will also be given to children with special needs and the integration of technology in the development of literacy skills. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a teacher preparation program

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26369101TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 344, LIN 544, and CEE 594

    Session 26369101Grace WivellOnline Sync/Async CombinedMonday05:30-08:20PMWest (Main Campus)Closed +
    ×

    Note: Offered as LIN 344, LIN 544, and CEE 594

  • LIN 578: Field Experience in Educationa

    Graduate 1 credit

    Enrollment in MA TESOL Program

    Exploration, inquiry, and practice of English language instruction strategies and approaches. Prerequisite: Admission to MA TESOL Teacher Education Program

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26341430Ana Manas LopezOnline SynchronousWednesday05:30-07:50PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    ×

  • LSF 501: Effective Prof. Communication

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHLS

    Concepts and practice in different modes of professional communication: writing in a variety of genres; designing effective, accessible presentations; speaking, and effective group problem solving and writing/communicating strategies, as well as using selected technologies to support these skills.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 163240S31Jennifer YoungOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: LSF 501 S.31 will meet ONLINE during the 6-week Summer Session 1 (C).

  • LSF 502: Effective Prof Thinking

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHSB

    Examines how to use, synthesize and analyze the vast amount of data professionals are exposed to daily. The course will be infused with how to utilize technologies in decision making processes. Competencies include using inductive versus deductive reasoning, learning how to effectively schedule, create and analyze spreadsheets and budgets, problem solving, thinking creatively, and using critical thinking skills.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65472S30Peter PeceOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • LSF 503: Eff Prof Global&Cultural Aware

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHSB

    Explores issues surrounding diversity and inclusion, beginning with a broad consideration of geographical and cultural globalization topics. Students will leverage the knowledge and skills garnered from readings on intercultural communication, diversities of ethnicity, religion, disability, gender and sexuality, in order to articulate best practices regarding justice and ethics in the workplace and on a national stage.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65479S30Katherine MitraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • LSF 504: Eff Prof Action, Leadership

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: SBLS

    Provides a professional roadmap for individuals who wish to navigate an enriched personal and professional path. This course focuses on helping learners to understand themselves as professionals and to take action for further and future development. Attention will be given to individual and group dynamics, leadership, self-monitoring, time management, and other important concepts for professional success.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    SPD Online65480S30Elisa ScottOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: This 10-week online course begins 5/23/22 ends 7/31/22; last day to add 6/6/22 4pm; visit https://www.stonybrook.edu/spd/elearning/ for online course requirements.

  • MAE 330: Technology in Math Education

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Prerequisites: MAE 301 and 311

    SBC: TECH

    Introduces students in the secondary mathematics teacher preparation program to techniques and requirements for effective use of technology in the mathematics classroom. Emphasis on projects. Use of graphing calculators and computer software such as Geometer's Sketchpad.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status Notes
    Session 26419830Alaa Abd-El-HafezOnline SynchronousTues. & Thurs.06:00-09:25PMWest (Main Campus)Open +
    ×

    Note: Synchronous Online Offered as MAE 330 and MAT 517

  • MAP 102: Proficiency Algebra Review

    Undergraduate 0 credit

    Prerequisite: permission of the department

    A noncredit, online, intensive review of topics from high school algebra as preparation for placement into statistics, precalculus, calculus and other mathematics. Numerical and algebraic operations, exponents, polynomials, rational expressions, graphing, analytic geometry of lines, solving linear and quadratic equations in one variable, solving linear systems in two variables, polynomials, factoring algebraic expressions, absolute value, inequalities, and the Binomial theorem. The final assessment in this course will be the Stony Brook mathematics placement exam; satisfactory completion of the course corresponds to placement level 3 or higher. A through C/Unsatisfactory grading only. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.