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Summer 2020 Courses

Session I

WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  - DIV, CER, SBS 
ONLINE -  Stephanie Bonvissuto
This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study.
 
WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference - CER, HUM, DIV
ONLINE - Melis Umut
An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.
 
WST 301: Histories of Feminism - SBS+, DIV
LEC 01: ONLINE - Andy Eicher 
  An historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women's rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.

Session II

WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  - DIV, CER, SBS 
ONLINE -  Carlos Vazquez
This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study.
 
WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference - CER, HUM, DIV
ONLINE - Annu Daftuar
An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.
 
WST 291 - Introduction to Feminist Theory - DIV, ESI, HFA+
ONLINE - Shruti Mukherjee 
An introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women's and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women's and Gender Studies .

Fall 2020  Courses ( **under construction**)

[WST Offerings]

WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  - DIV, CER, SBS  
Mon/Wed - 2:30 - 3:50 pm
  Tu/Th - 1:00 - 2:20 pm - Cristina Khan
ONLINE Section 
This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study.
 
WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference - CER, HUM, DIV
Mon/Wed - 4:00 - 5:20pm
Tu/Th - 10:00 - 11:20am - Nancy Hiemstra
Tu/Th - 11:30 - 12:50 pm
ONLINE Section 
An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.
 
WST 111: Introduction to Queer Studies  - DIV, CER, HUM
Mon/Wed 4:00  - 5:20 pm 
ONLINE Section 
This course will provide students with a broad overview of queer studies and major theorists and thinkers within the field. Beginning with Foucault before turning to more contemporary theorists, this course will be an interdisciplinary approach to American queer studies. Through the examination of visual culture, literature, and theory, students will learn to read critically through the lenses of queer theory, critical ethnic studies, disability studies, and feminist theory.
  
WST 210: Contemporary Issues in WaGS  -  DIV, CER, SBS+
Tu/Th - 1:00 - 2:20 pm: "Far Beyond Binary: Sex, Gender, & Science Fiction" - Ritch Calvin
ONLINE - Topic TBA
 
 
WST 291: Introduction to Feminist Theory - DIV, ESI, HFA+
Wed 10:00 - 12:50 pm - Mary Jo Bona 
ONLINE Section
An introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women's and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women's and Gender Studies .
 
WST 301: Histories of Feminism - SBS+, DIV
Tu/Th - 10:00 - 11:20 am - Ritch Calvin
ONLINE Section
  An historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women's rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.
   
WST 305: Feminist Theories in Context - HFA+
Mon/Wed -  2:30 - 3:50 pm - Liz Montegary
This course offers students an introduction to major traditions in critical and cultural theory while focusing specifically on how feminist scholars have pushed these theories in new directions. The aim of this class is not to provide a comprehensive survey of modern theoretical traditions; instead, we will examine several key theoretical terms that have become central to feminist thought during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. In addition to unpacking the ways in which liberalism and neoliberalism have shaped contemporary debates about sex, gender, and sexuality, we will also look at how feminist perspectives have challenged and complicated theories of nationalism and citizenship, labor and consumption, and representation and circulation. In doing so, we will gain insight into how feminist theories inform and are informed by other interdisciplinary fields, such as queer studies, disability studies, transgender studies, postcolonial studies, and critical race and ethnic studies.
 
WST 392: Topics in Women & Science - "Documenting Mental Illness" - STAS
Mon/Wed - 2:30 - 3:50 pm - Lisa Diedrich
Description TBA
 
WST 395: Topics in Global Feminism - "Borders in the Americas"  - DIV, GLO, SBS+
Tu/Th 2:30 - 3:50 pm - Nancy Hiemstra
Description TBA 
 
WST 398: Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity - "Race and Sex Work" - SBS+, DIV 
Tu/Th 2:30 - 3:50 pm   - Cristina Khan
Description TBA
 
WST 399: Topics in Gender & Sexuality - " Fantasy Worlds: Gender, Race, and Class in American Popular Culture" - HFA+, DIV
Tu/Th -  11:30 - 12:50 pm - Vicky Hesford
Description TBA
 
WST 407/408: Senior Research Seminar for Women's and Gender Studies
Majors & Minors - EXP+, SPK, WRTD
Wed 4:00 - 6:50 pm - Liz Montegary
An exploration of significant feminist scholarship in various disciplines designed for students who are majoring in disciplines other than women's and gender studies. Seminar participants present and discuss reports on reading and research.
 
 
 
[Elective Offerings Outside of WST]
(**under contstruction**)

This is not an all-inclusive list; courses may be added.  Please contact our Undergraduate Program Director, Nancy Hiemstra at nancy.hiemstra@stonybrook.edu if you find a course not on this list and would like for it to be evaluated to count as an elective towards the major or minor.

AAS 391.01 – “Dystopia: Race, Gender and the End Times” – HFA+
Nerissa Balce - Tu/Th 4:00-5:20
Past topics have included titles such as Sikhism; Introduction to Indian Philosophy; Modern Indian Literature; and Appreciating Indian Music. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes.
 
AAS 372/ANT 372 - Family, Marriage, and Kinship in China – SBS+
Gregory Ruf - M/W 2:30-3:50
Examines forms and dynamics of social organizations in Chinese society, focusing on cultural, social, and economic aspects of family, marriage, and extended kinship relations such as lineages, clans, and sworn brotherhoods. Particular attention is paid to how gender, generation, class, and ritual exchange shape identity, status, and power. This course is offered as both AAS 372 and ANT 372.
 
AFH 382/EGL382/WST382 – Black Women’s Literature of the African Diaspora – HFA+
Tracey Walters – Tu/Th 10:00 – 11:20am
Black women's literature presents students with the opportunity to examine through literature the political, social, and historical experiences of Black women from the African Diaspora.  The course is structured around five major themes commonly addressed in Black women's writing:  Black female oppression, sexual politics of Black womanhood, Black female sexuality, Black male/female relationships, and Black women and defining self.  This course is offered as AFH 382, EGL 382, and WST 382. 
 
AFS 306 - Gender and Public Health in Africa - GLO, SBS+
Adryan Wallace - M/W 4-5:20
Examines approaches to disease prevention and treatment through public health systems in African countries. The impact of global health organizations such as WHO, UNAIDS and other UN bodies and international development organizations on domestic health care policy is also analyzed. An emphasis is placed on identifying the most prominent public health issues in each of the county case studies and identifying points of convergence and divergence among them. More specifically their relationships to gender equality, education, and economic security and population displacement will be evaluated using Intersectionality as a theoretical framework. Disparities in access to health insurance, treatment, and medication, and funding mechanisms will be analyzed. 
 
EGL 276/WST 276 - Feminism: Literature and Cultural Contexts - DIV, HUM
Heidi Hutner - M/W 11:00-11:53
An examination of works written by or about women reflecting conceptions of women in drama, poetry, and fiction. The course focuses on literature seen in relation to women's sociocultural and historical position. This course is offered as both EGL 276 and WST 276.
 
EGL 382/AFH 382/WST 382 - Black Women's Lit of Diaspora - HFA+ 
Tracey Walters – Tu/Th 10:00-11:20AM
Black women's literature presents students with the opportunity to examine through literature the political, social, and historical experiences of Black women from the African Diaspora. The course is structured around five major themes commonly addressed in Black women's writing: Black female oppression, sexual politics of Black womanhood, Black female sexuality, Black male/female relationships, and Black women and defining self. This course is offered as AFH 382, EGL 382, and WST 382.
 
HIS 345/WST 345 - Women in Chinese History - SBS+
Iona Man-Cheong - LEC - MW 12:00-12:53 and REC
A dynamic exploration of Chinese women’s revolutions from 19 th through 20 th century: how Chinese women struggled to change society’s social and political expectations and overcome traditional patriarchal bondage. We examine the important intersectionality of gender roles, sexuality, ethnicity and shifting cultural pressures within a changing global framework. Sources include primary sources, fiction, and visual media interpretations.
 
HIS 383 - The World of Jane Austin - HFA+, SBS+
Kathleen Wilson – Tu/Th 5:30-6:50
An examination of the social, political and cultural milieux and legacies of Jane Austen's famous novels, including the contours of English provincial and gentry society in the Revolutionary, Napoleonic and Regency periods (1792-1820). Topics will include class and sociability; the functions of the country house; gender and family relations; the pleasures and dangers of urban culture; fashion and leisure pursuits, including tourism; women, theatre and print culture; the impact of empire, war and radical politics on social and political relations of the day, and the details of Jane Austen's own life, along the ways in which Austen novels were appropriated and used by subsequent generations and in different cultural contexts, from the Victorian critics to twentieth-century Bollywood film adaptations to twenty-first century blogs.
 
POL 330/WST 330 - Gender Issues and the Law - DIV, SBS+
Juliette Passer - W 5:30-8:30
A critical exploration of American law that specifically addresses the issues of (in)equality of women and men in the United States. The course surveys and analyzes cases from the pre-Civil War era to the end of the 20th century dealing with various manifestations of sex discrimination, decided in the federal court system, typically by the Supreme Court, and the state court system. The course also considers how the political nature of the adjudicative process has ramifications for the decisions rendered by a court. This course is offered as both POL 330 and WST 330.
 
PSY 342 Psychology of Women’s Health - DIV
Marci Lobel - Tu/Th 2:30-3:50
An investigation of psychological aspects of women's health and gender differences in health through readings, lectures, films, guest speakers and presentations, class discussions, a writing assignment, and other educational activities.
 
SOC 247/WST 247 - Sociology of Gender - DIV, SBS
Linda Wicks - Tu/Th 11:30-12:50
The historical and contemporary roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women's liberation and related movements. Themes are situated within the context of historical developments in the U.S. This course is offered as both SOC 247 and WST 247.
 
SOC 340/WST 340 -  Sociology of Human Reproduction - STAS
Cathy Marrone - W 5:30-8:20
A study of the links between biological reproduction and the socioeconomic and cultural processes that affect and are affected by it. The history of the transition from high levels of fertility and mortality to low levels of both; different kinship, gender, and family systems around the world and their links to human reproduction; the value of children in different social contexts; and the social implications of new reproductive technologies. This course is offered as both SOC 340 and WST 340.
 
SPN 405 – Issues in Hispanic Cultural Studies: “Women, Power, Early Modern Spain” – ESI, HFA+
Victoriano Roncero-Lopez – Tu/Th 11:30 – 12:50
Readings, viewings, and theoretical discussion of Spanish or Latin American culture with special focus on one or more issues (colonialism, imperialism, national identity, indigenism, subjectivity) as manifested in a specific cultural form or forms (testimonial literature, popular culture, cinema, novel, short story, poetry, television). May be repeated as the topic changes.
_________________________________________________________________________________________
 
Spring 2020 Courses that can substitute for WST 395, 398, and 399 topics courses:
WST 395 (Topics in Global Feminism): AFS 306; HIS/WST 345; SPN 405
WST 398 (Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity): AAS 391; WST/EGL/AFH 382
WST 399 (Topics in Gender and Sexuality): WST 374; WST 340
 
NOTE: Only approved topics courses from other departments count. Make sure to check the course title, not just the number. If you see a course not on this list that you think could count, email nancy.hiemstra@stonybrook.edu to check.