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  Summer 2020 Courses

Session I

WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  - DIV, CER, SBS 
ONLINE -  Stephanie Bonvissuto
This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study.
 
WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference - CER, HUM, DIV
ONLINE - Melis Umut
An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.
 
WST 301: Histories of Feminism - SBS+, DIV
LEC 01: ONLINE - Andy Eicher 
  An historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women's rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.

Session II

WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  - DIV, CER, SBS 
ONLINE -  Carlos Vazquez
This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study.
 
WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference - CER, HUM, DIV
ONLINE - Annu Daftuar
An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.
 
WST 291 - Introduction to Feminist Theory - DIV, ESI, HFA+
ONLINE - Shruti Mukherjee 
An introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women's and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women's and Gender Studies .

Fall 2020  Courses 

[WST Offerings]

WST 102:  Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences  - DIV, CER, SBS  
ONLINE - Kai Breaux
ONLINE - Cristina Khan
ONLINE - Jose Flores Sanchez
This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey that will familiarize students with gender and sexuality theories, histories of women’s and feminist movements, and current debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. We draw on sources from across the social sciences to understand how gender and sex is explained with respect to specific physical bodies; formulates identities within gendered institutions; and influences our everyday personal and political interactions. Critically thinking of these issues can only occur when we include the intersection of racial, class, age, ableist and national identities within our analysis. The overarching theme of power, hierarchy, and privilege in structured(ing) institutions will always guide our study.
 
WST 103: Women, Culture, Difference - CER, HUM, DIV
ONLINE  - Tasmia Haque
Tues/Thur 9:45 - 11:05 a.m. ONLINE - Nancy Hiemstra
ONLINE - Zoey Chu
ONLINE - Stephanie Bonvissuto
An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.
 
WST 111: Introduction to Queer Studies  - DIV, CER, HUM
ONLINE -  Carlos Vazquez
ONLINE - Desi Self 
This course will provide students with a broad overview of queer studies and major theorists and thinkers within the field. Beginning with Foucault before turning to more contemporary theorists, this course will be an interdisciplinary approach to American queer studies. Through the examination of visual culture, literature, and theory, students will learn to read critically through the lenses of queer theory, critical ethnic studies, disability studies, and feminist theory.
  
WST 210: Contemporary Issues in WaGS  -  DIV, CER, SBS+
Tues/Thurs 1:15 - 2:35 p.m. ONLINE -  "Far Beyond Binary: Sex, Gender, & Science Fiction" - Ritch Calvin
Both biology and Queer Theory tells us that sex is not simply male and female. Science fiction writers have been exploring this possibility for a long time. In this class, we will read and watch science fiction that explores the possibilities of sex, gender, and sexuality from Beyond the Binary. Although we will read a few historical stories, the majority of texts will be from the past 10 years.
 
WST 210: Contemporary Issues in WaGS  -  DIV, CER, SBS+
ONLINE - " Toxic Ecologies: Race and place in the U.S." - Miranda Saenz
This course urges students to think about the way race is used as a central weapon for the social construction of space. We will analyze the use of language in its maintenance, rethinking the ways in which we occupy, occupied space. We will examine the way technology allows for us to transcend our geographic locations in meaningful and harmful ways. To denormalize the presence of borders- to instead addressing the creation of borders and the imagined fear of its porousness. We will discuss larger themes of colonialism, surveillance, globalization, gentrification, imprisonment, utopia/dystopia, longing and belonging. Explorations of “time, space, place”, memory, identity will be done utilizing an transnational feminist lens. Topics range from literal physical structures- prison industrial complex, immigration detention, segregated public housing, reservations, etc.- to more metaphorical structures such as homelessness, the NFL, food justice, among others. At the end of the course students should have a better understanding of their role in the production of space, our movement within spaces, and begin to reimaging future anti-racist, anti-imperalist spaces
 
WST 291: Introduction to Feminist Theory - DIV, ESI, HFA+
Wed 10:30 - 1:20 p.m. ONLINE - Mary Jo Bona 
ONLINE - Annu Daftuar
An introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women's and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women's and Gender Studies .
 
WST 301: Histories of Feminism - SBS+, DIV
Tues/Thurs 9:45 - 11:05 a.m. ONLINE - Ritch Calvin
ONLINE - Valerie Moyer
An historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women's rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.
   
WST 305: Feminist Theories in Context - HFA+
Mon/Wed 2:40 - 4:00 p.m. ONLINE - Liz Montegary
This course offers students an introduction to major traditions in critical and cultural theory while focusing specifically on how feminist scholars have pushed these theories in new directions. The aim of this class is not to provide a comprehensive survey of modern theoretical traditions; instead, we will examine several key theoretical terms that have become central to feminist thought during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. In addition to unpacking the ways in which liberalism and neoliberalism have shaped contemporary debates about sex, gender, and sexuality, we will also look at how feminist perspectives have challenged and complicated theories of nationalism and citizenship, labor and consumption, and representation and circulation. In doing so, we will gain insight into how feminist theories inform and are informed by other interdisciplinary fields, such as queer studies, disability studies, transgender studies, postcolonial studies, and critical race and ethnic studies.
 
WST 392: Topics in Women & Science - "Documenting Mental Illness" - STAS
ONLINE - Lisa Diedrich
Mental illness often comes into public consciousness in the United States through the specter of violence, such as in the many horrific mass shootings where the shooter’s mental health is questioned. The media frenzy that accompanies these tragic events presents a picture of mental illness that is at best limited and at worst harmful. Indeed, statistics show clearly that people who are mentally ill are more likely to be victims of violence than to commit violence. In this course we will explore mental illness as a category of analysis that comes into being through a multiplicity of discourses, practices, and institutions. We will look at a variety of case studies about the experience and event of mental illness in diverse situations and communities, and as presented in a variety of genres and forms—psychological and sociological analyses, documentary and feature films, graphic and prose memoirs, and through interviews with people who deal with mental illness in their daily lives. We will explore how certain social situations—including, colonialism, incarceration, sexual violence, and trauma—produce “nervous conditions” that can be disabling. We will look at historical and contemporary diagnoses of and treatments for mental illness, as well as forms of activism, including patient-centered advocacy, anti- and radical psychiatry, and the Mad Pride and neurodiversity movements. Our goal is to expand and complicate our understanding of the biopsychosocial politics of mental illness, as well as to think broadly and creatively about effective, and even radical, ways to treat mental illness and generate personal and social health and well-being.
 
WST 395: Topics in Global Feminism - " Immigration, Borders, and Identity in the Americas."  - DIV, GLO, SBS+
Tues/Thurs 3:00 - 4:20 p.m. ONLINE - Nancy Hiemstra
This course explores reasons for and consequences of human mobility across borders in the Americas, through a feminist, interdisciplinary lens. The borders we consider are not just territorial borders; we will also consider how categories such as gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, and legal status can work as boundaries in individuals’ lives, as well as how they contribute to the conceptual bordering of national identity. We draw on case studies of specific regions, countries and groups of people to sketch a broad understanding of the role immigration—and the policing of immigration and national borders—plays in maintaining global hierarchies of power. While we focus on migration from Latin America and the Caribbean to the United States, we also consider other migration patterns in the Americas.
 
WST 398: Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity - "Race and Sex Work" - SBS+, DIV ONLINE  - Cristina Khan
From the onset of the U.S. American “sex wars,”  feminist discourses on sex work often deploy an analytical lens that is solely related to gender and sexuality in social and structural analyses of power within the field. In this class, we will explore how participants’ experiences in various forms of sex work (and scholarly interpretation of them), are shaped by racism, white normativity, and colonialism. We will begin by examining the question of what constitutes sex work and uncover how different definitions of what effectively “counts” as sex work enable and produce a hierarchical moral system that pathologizes participants who are marginalized on the bases of race, gender identity, ability, and class distinctly from more privileged participants. Central frameworks to be explored include transnational feminism, intersectionality, racialized sexualities, and the “rescue industry.”
 
WST 399: Topics in Gender & Sexuality - " Fantasy Worlds: Gender, Race, and Class in American Mass Culture" - HFA+, DIV
ONLINE - Vicky Hesford
From the 1970s TV show about an independent modern young woman,  The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970-1977), to the 2017 horror film about race relations in the U.S.,  Get Out, the media has been a primary technology of gender, sexual, and racial difference in the US. In this course, we will approach television (from its network beginnings to its digital present) and cinema as fantasy machines for imagined and idealized ways of being in the U.S. from the mid twentieth century to the present day. Through analysis of a variety of TV shows and films we will analyze how the mass media has shaped racial, sexual, and gendered forms of belonging and distinction in the U.S. from the era of “socially relevant” television in the 1970s to the present day. This course will also introduce the student to key texts in feminist and queer media criticism and film theory, as well as theories of mass and popular culture. 
 
WST 407/408: Senior Research Seminar for Women's and Gender Studies
Majors & Minors - EXP+, SPK, WRTD
Wednesdays 4:25 - 7:15 p.m. ONLINE - Liz Montegary
An exploration of significant feminist scholarship in various disciplines designed for students who are majoring in disciplines other than women's and gender studies. Seminar participants present and discuss reports on reading and research.
 
 
[Elective Offerings Outside of WST]
 
This is not an all-inclusive list; courses may be added.  Please contact our Undergraduate Program Director, Nancy Hiemstra at nancy.hiemstra@stonybrook.edu if you find a course not on this list and would like for it to be evaluated to count as an elective towards the major or minor .
 
AAS 366 -  Feminine Spirituality 
Mon/Wed - 2:40-4:00 PM - Sachiko Murata
The role and destiny of human beings as envisaged by the world's great traditions, especially the Chinese and the Islamic. The course focuses on the concept of femininity as a principle in the realms of theology, metaphysics, cosmology, and spiritual psychology; and the theoretical and practical applications of the feminine principle to the place of both men and women in society. Topics include feminine and masculine as metaphysical and cosmological principles; woman and religious law; woman's role in symbolism, mythology, and literature; and the feminine aspects of the self that both women and men need to develop on the path of achieving spiritual perfection. Previously offered as RLS 426, this course is now offered as RLS 366. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 426. This course is offered as both AAS 366 and RLS 366.
 
 
AFS 381/WST 381 -  AIDS, Race, Gender/Black Community
Mon/Fri - 1:00 - 2:20 PM -  George Aumoithe
Review of current biological and epidemiological knowledge about the HIV virus, and examination of the virus' social impact on the Black community. This course is offered as both AFS 381 and WST 381
  
EGL 309 - Interdisciplinary Study of Literature - Non-Western Environmental Feminisms: Land, Bodies, and Climate (In)Justice 
ONLINE - Sarah Davis
In this interdisciplinary special topics course, we will explore “climate justice” and how it varies with gender, sexuality, race, and class, focusing specifically on regions known as the Global South. The first part of our class will introduce historical and ecological concepts, including settler colonialism, slow violence, the International Monetary Fund, ecofeminism, and biodiversity. We will survey how economic, social, and political history and power broadly inform environmental policies in Africa, Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America, as well as indigenous North American communities. During the second part, we will analyze narratives of several key environmental disasters and issues, such as Fukushima and food sovereignty, in those same geographical areas. We will read and listen to attempts by victims and officials to capture physical, emotional, and ecological experience within various contemporary media.   Much of our time together will be spent investigating how Global South environmental activists – largely identifying as female – work to highlight these injustices and enact change locally and globally through literature, film, theater, and oral history. The following are some of our organizing questions for the semester: What is climate (in)justice? What is environmental activism? What is environmental feminism? How do environmental policies and disasters affect lands or bodies differently? Who is allowed to protest? Are certain modes or media for capturing and protesting climate injustice more effective than others? How can we become effective climate justice activists in our own communities? Potential environmental writer-activist-feminists we will research and discuss include J. Kēhaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli), Mizuho Fukushima (Japan), Kathy Jetn̄il-Kijiner (Marshall Island), Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe), Berta Cáceres (Honduras), Wangari Maathai (Kenya), Vandana Shiva (India), Makoma Lekalakala (South Africa), Jacqui Katona (Aboriginal Australia), and Máxima Acuña (Peru). Because of the real world applications of activism our course will examine, students who wish to participate in experiential learning may, in close consultation with the instructor, fill out the appropriate paperwork to add the EXP+ component.
 
HIS 323 - Women of Color in the U.S. - DIV; SBS+
Mon/Wed  8:30 - 9:50 AM ONLINE - Shirley Lim
In what ways is the history of race in America a gendered history? This course will focus on the creation of the modern color line in American history by analyzing the 20th century cultural productions of African American, Asian American, Native American, and Latina/Chicana women. Our central concern will be the ways in which race has been historically constructed as a gendered category.  This course is offered as both HIS 323 and WST 323. This course is offered as both HIS 323 and WST 323.
 
 
PSY 240 - Survey in Social Psychology - DIV; SBS+
Tues/Thurs - 8:00 - 9:20 AM ONLINE - Marci Lobel 
A presentation of various topics in social psychology including interpersonal processes, obedience to authority, social perception, attitude change, attraction and liking, and aggression and violence, especially as applied to national and international issues.
 
PSY 347 - Psychology of Women - SBS+
Tues/Thurs - 1:15 - 2:35 PM ONLINE - Bonita London-Thompson 
The psychological impact of important physiological and sociological events and epochs in the lives of women; menstruation, female sexuality, marriage, childbirth, and menopause; women and mental health, mental illness and psychotherapy; the role of women in the field of psychology. This course is offered as both PSY 347 and  WST 377.
 
SOC 247 Sociology of Gender - DIV, SBS
ONLINE - Kathleen Fallon
The historical and contemporary roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women's liberation and related movements.  Themes are situated within the context of historical developments in the U.S. This course is offered as both SOC 247 and  WST 247
 
SOC 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction - STAS
Wed - 6:06 - 8:55 PM - ONLINE Catherine Marrone 
A study of the links between biological reproduction and the socioeconomic and cultural processes that affect and are affected by it. The history of the transition from high levels of fertility and mortality to low levels of both; different kinship, gender, and family systems around the world and their links to human reproduction; the value of children in different social contexts; and the social implications of new reproductive technologies. This course is offered as both SOC 340 and  WST 340.
 
SOC 394 Masculinities and Manhood - EXP+, SBS+
Tues/Thurs 3:00 - 4:20 PM ONLINE - Charles Robbins
Past  topics have included titles such as The Sociology of Aging and (Re)Thinking Masculinities and Manhood. This course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within social sciences disciplines such as history, economics, political science, and linguistics. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, and knowledge of the major concepts, models, and issues of the social science discipline(s) studied. This course satisfies the Experiential Learning SBC category. Students will be required to complete a community intervention project. May be repeated as the topic changes.
_________________________________________________________________________________________
 
Fall 2020 Courses that can substitute for WST 395, 398, and 399 topics courses:
  • WST 395 (Topics in Global Feminism): AFS 373; EGL 309
  • WST 398 (Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity): WST 381; HIS 396.01 (Race, Sex & Love in US History): HIS 323 Women of Color in U.S.
  • WST 399 (Topics in Gender and Sexuality): WST 111; WST 340

NOTES: 

 *Only approved topics courses from other departments count. Make sure to check the course title, not just the number. If you see a course not on this list that you think could count, email nancy.hiemstra@stonybrook.edu to check.*

*At least two WST topics courses (taught by WST-affiliated instructors) must be used to satisfy the topics courses requirement.