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ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION    

Title
Henry W. Moeller Collection

Collection Number
SC 432

OCLC Number
In-process

Creator 
Henry W. Moeller

Provenance 
Gifts of Henry W. Moeller in 2009, 2012, and 2017.

Extent, Scope, and Content Note
The collection comprises 22.5 linear ft. of Dr. Henry W. Moeller’s original research files, notes, maps, photocopies, and visual materials that document Long Island history, with an emphasis on the Town of Southampton and the HMS Culloden (1776), a British warship that ran aground in 1781 on Culloden Point, Montauk, Long Island, New York on January 23, 1781. Photographs taken by Henry W. Moeller and others during the archaeological excavation and conservation of the Culloden are part of the collection. The date coverage of the collection is 1738 to 2017.

Books received with the collection have been separated and cataloged and are housed in the Main Stacks collection and in Special Collections. These volumes can be identified by searching the library’s online catalog and entering in the search bar “Henry W. Moeller Collection."

Henry W. Moeller is a member of the North American Vexillological Association, an organization dedicated to the scientific and scholarly study of flag history and symbolism. He is also a member of the North American Society of Oceanic History and has published a number of articles on marine archaeology following his discovery of the HMS Culloden , a British man-of-war that sank at Montauk Point, New York in 1781. In addition to his research on the origin of the American flag and marine archeology, he is well known for his pioneering work in mariculture.  He holds an A.B. degree from Drew University and an M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Rutgers University. He taught undergraduate courses in oceanography, marine archeology, and botany at Dowling College in Oakdale, New York.

Arrangement and Processing Note
Finding aid updated and revised by Kristen J. Nyitray in April 2020.

Series 1: Biographical
Contains writings and bibliography of Henry W. Moller.

Series 2: HMS Culloden 
Contains documentation of the HMS Culloden and the archeological excavation of it in the form of visual materials, correspondence, subject files, and drawings.

Series 3: Subject Files
Contains documentation of activities in Town of Southampton, New York with an emphasis on land issues surrounding the Canoe Place Inn in Hampton Bays and the early history of the town.

Series 4: Artifacts 
Contains one modern, yellow rope used to gauge the depth of water during the archeological excavation of the HMS Culloden .

Series 5: Maps
Contains facsimiles and copies of maps with an emphasis on the Town of Southampton.

Series 6: History of the Archaeological Excavation and Conservation of the HMS Culloden.

Language
English 

Restrictions on Access
The collection is open to researchers without restriction.

Rights and Permissions 
Stony Brook University Libraries' consent to access as the physical owner of the collection does not address copyright issues that may affect publication rights. It is the sole responsibility of the user of Special Collections and University Archives materials to investigate the copyright status of any given work and to seek and obtain permission where needed prior to publication.  

Citation 
[Item], [Box], Henry W. Moeller Collection, Special Collections and University Archives, Stony Brook University Libraries.

Historical Note
Prepared by Dr. Henry W. Moeller.

"The Culloden Shipwreck (1781) at Culloden Point in Montauk, New York is a world class nonrenewable resource in the Town of East Hampton, New York. The shipwreck is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is one of twelve Royal Navy ships of the line lost during the American Revolution throughout the world. A more thorough description of British warship losses is provided in the attached publication.

The original purpose for taking the photographs was to document the discovery and subsequent archaeological activities that took place on the wreck site. A secondary objective was to document artifacts during the period they received conservation treatment in my laboratory. Finally a number of photographs were used in preparation for a 2004 exhibit of the shipwreck at Clinton Academy in East Hampton, New York. While they were given permission to use my photographs for the exhibit, no rights were given to them for subsequent use.”

Subjects
Moeller, Henry W.
Moeller, Henry W., -- Archives.
Underwater archaeology.
Excavations (Archaeology) -- New York (State) -- Long Island.
Long Island (N.Y.) -- Antiquities.
Shipwrecks -- New York Region.
Shipwrecks.
United States -- New York Region.
Indians of North America -- New York (State) -- Long Island -- Antiquities.
Antiquities.
Excavations (Archaeology).
Indians of North America -- Antiquities.
New York (State) -- Long Island.
New York (State) -- Southampton.
Flags -- United States -- History.
Emblems, National -- United States -- History.
United States -- Politics and government -- Miscellanea.
United States -- Symbolic representation.
Emblems, National.
Flags.
Politics and government.
United States.

INVENTORY

Series 1: Biographical
Contains writings and bibliography of Henry W. Moeller

Box 1
Folder 1: bibliography, Henry W. Moeller
Folder 2: manuscript, The Thirteen-Star American Flag: Origin of a Symbol, 2015 (1 of 2)
Folder 3: manuscript, The Thirteen-Star American Flag: Origin of a Symbol, 2015 (2 of 2)

Series 2: HMS Culloden 
Contains documentation of the HMS  Culloden and the archeological excavation of it in the form of visual materials, correspondence, subject files, and drawings.

Folder 4
Item 1: H. W. Moeller’s list of photographic negatives
Item 2: letter from H.W. Moller about the HMS Culloden and gifting collection to Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries

Folder 5
Page 1 (26 negatives): Culloden Point, Montauk, New York; 18th century salvage techniques; John Allgauer, excavator; pot hunters on small boat
Page 2 (28 negatives): intact shoe; shoe parts; shoe parts; bottom of powder bag(?); side panel-pulley; pottery and iron; lead shot; grapeshot; fish and food artifacts
Page 3 (30 negatives): grenade; copper sheet; pipe (clay); bowl of a pipe and stem, bolt; lead fingers; fire brick; glass; bone fragments; garbage truck with motto
Page 4 (34 negatives): 30 quadrat photographs; pine bark; air lift assembly
Page 5 (32 negatives): 15 quadrat photographs; clam shells; pine bark; rope; belt buckles; spoon
Page 6 (34 negatives): shoes; rope; spoon; quadrat; gudgeon on garage floor (not part of Moeller recovery); shoe buckle
Page 7 (32 negatives): shoe buckles; Montauk Fire Department; anchor chain; pulley wheel; bowl fragments; diver at Culloden Point; quadrat photographs;John Allgauer; rope
Page 8 (31 negatives): button; shoe buckle; pottery; copper sheathing; pipe stem; shoe leather; gudgeon on garage floor; Christine Gustafson; Henry Moeller; unidentified persons; shoe
Page 9 (31 negatives): straight pins; spigot for rum or brandy cask; rope; bottom of cartridge carrier; rope; vessel used for excavation, Wild Thyme; unidentified
Page 10 (28 negatives): Montauk garbage truck; rope; woven hemp mat; buckle; straight pins; spoon; rum bottle; shoe buckle; pottery
Page 11 (15 negatives): barrel parts; shoe buckle; glass bottle; hasp or U-bolt
Page 12 (34 negatives): triangular piece of wood along keel line; shoe heel; wooden spoon; barrel; seal marking for a spoon
Page 13 (31 negatives): glass; students aboard Dowling College research vessel; pottery shard; shoe; spoon
Page 14 (15 negatives): wooden spoon; pottery; cattle bone; shoe; Dowling College research vessel; unidentified objects
Page 15 (35 negatives): pottery shards; shoe parts; spoon parts
Page 16 (29 negatives): pipe stem and bowl; rum or brandy spigot; belt parts; copper sheathing; grapeshot or cannonball
Page 17 (30 negatives): cannonballs; grapeshot; bottle; iron chain
Page 18 (34 negatives): copper sheathing; brass hoops; shoe buckle; grapeshot
Page 19 (34 negatives): chain bolt; copper sheathing brass nails; firebricks from the hearth; sea shells; underlayment for copper sheathing; iron nails; rope; musket ball or grapeshot; wooden pins; anchor chain; woven hemp matting
Page 20 (30 negatives): cannonballs; broad arrow to designate king’s property; cooper barrel hoop; chain
Page 21 (25 negatives): third gudgeon excavated by Robert Miller; copper sheathing; barrel hoops; buttons; spoon; lead shot; fire brick; pins
Page 22 (28 negatives): spigot; shoe buckle; barrel hoop; bottle; spoon; chain; button
Page 23 (28 negatives): intact shoe; details of spoon; whipped rope
Page 24 (25 negatives): items 1-12 canon (excavation by Carl Davidson with son and salvage workers; photograph by Paul Knight); Wild Thyme; wood from the Culloden being attacked by Limnoria “grebe” or ship worm 

Folder 6: photographs of canon, gudgeon, etc.
Folder 7: contact sheets of negatives (7 pages)
Folder 8: contact sheets of negatives (7 pages)
Folder 9: Culloden, artifact loan agreement
Folder 10: Culloden, clippings
Folder 11: Culloden, correspondence (1 of 4)
Folder 12: Culloden, correspondence (2 of 4)
Folder 13: Carl Davidson lecture, 1974
Folder 14: transcripts of phone conversations, 1973
Folder 15: Henry Moeller letter to Dowling College, 1973
Folder 16: transcript, meeting with Perry Duryea, Henry Moeller, Carl Davidson, 1973

Box 2
Folder 1: Culloden, correspondence (3 of 4)
Folder 2: Culloden, correspondence (4 of 4)
Folder 3: Culloden, drawings and sketches
Folder 4: Culloden, grants
Folder 5: Culloden, list of artifacts
Folder 6: Culloden, memoir by Stu Swersie and Carl Davidson
Folder 7: Culloden, diary by Henry W. Moeller
Folder 8: Culloden, National Register
Folder 9: Culloden, notes
Folder 10: Culloden, research articles and papers (1 of 3)
Folder 11: Culloden, research articles and papers (2 of 3)
Folder 12: Culloden, research articles and papers (3 of 3)
Folder 13: Culloden, subject file
Folder 14: Longwood, Franklin R. Present and Potential Commercial Timbers of the Caribbean: With Special Reference to the West Indies, the Guianas and British Honduras . Washington, DC: USDA, 1971. (1 of 2)
Folder 15: Longwood, Franklin R. Present and Potential Commercial Timbers of the Caribbean: With Special Reference to the West Indies, the Guianas and British Honduras . Washington, DC: USDA, 1971. (2 of 2)
Folder 16: Urca De Lima or Refuerzo
Folder 17: copper sheathing
Folder 18: pottery
Folder 19: compressor log
Folder 20: copies, sketches by Robert Zoeller of the S.S. "Gates Cities," Havens House (East Moriches, NY), and the schooner “Miles M. Merry”
Folder 21: photograph, Fort Pond Bay, undated
Folder 22: archaeological site inventory form, Division for Historic Preservation, New York State Parks and Recreation

Box 18, Item 4: tracing made on exterior of HMS  Culloden : Roman numeral VIII

Box 21, section 1 (oversized)
Item 1: copy, engraving of HMS Culloden , undated
Item 2: copy, deck plan, HMS Culloden
Item 3: copy, stern, HMS Culloden
Item 4: copy, plans, HMS Culloden
Item 5: copy, bow, HMS Culloden
Item 6: copy, deck, HMS Culloden
Item 7: copy, schematic plans, HMS Culloden
Item 8: copy, deck, HMS Culloden
Item 9: drafting film, deck, HMS Culloden
Item 10: drafting film, frame and keelson, HMS Culloden
Item 11: drafting film, HMS Culloden

Series 3: Subject Files
Contains documentation of activities in Town of Southampton, New York with an emphasis on land issues surrounding the Canoe Place Inn in Hampton Bays and the early history of the town.

Box 3
Folder 1: H.W. Moeller correspondence with Oysterponds Historical Society

Folder 2: copies of Phillip’s family deeds

Folder 3: H.W. Moeller letter regarding Phillip’s claim

Folder 4: Town of Southampton, copy of Index to Liber B 1862; copy of contents of “Small Book of Deeds, Southampton Town Clerk’s office”

Folder 5: H.W. Moeller letters and files regarding NOAA US Coast & Geodetic Survey Map #70 (1838)

Folder 6: H.W. Moeller notes and files on C. Marvin Raynor survey of Native American lands in Hampton Bays, New York

Folder 7: files on road through Shinnecock Hills, Shinnecock Canal, and Canoe Place

Folder 8: illustrations of Canoe Place

Folder 9: files on Long Island Rail Road in the Town of Southampton

Folder 10: Town of Southampton school district boundaries, 19 th century

Folder 11: files on Southampton

Folder 12: files on Shinnecock Canal (War Department, 1918)

Folder 13: copies of Native American land deeds, 19 th century

Box 4
Folder 1: copies, Shinnecock and Westwoods Lands in Southampton by James P. Lynch

Folder 2: copies, early Conklin deeds at the Suffolk County Historical Society and one deed for Red Creek area

Folder 3: copies, Red Creek deeds, Southampton

Folder 4: copies, censuses of Good Ground, 1880 and 1910; newspaper clippings

Folder 5: copies, George Seaman (early owner of Canoe Place Inn)

Folder 6: copies, Israel Conklin deeds and mortgages

Folder 7: copies, Israel Conklin genealogy

Folder 8: copies, Howell family deeds, East Hampton Public Library

Folder 9: "Squires Land in Squiretown, Long Island, New York" by Tiger Gardiner, 1995, unpublished paper (based on H. W. Moeller research)

Folder 10: Abstract of Title for the Long Island Improvement Company, Limited Lands known as the Shinnecock Hills and Sebonac Neck; Cuffee family papers

Box 5
Folder 1: copies, New York State Shinnecock land records

Folder 2: title searches on Canoe Place Division

Folder 3**: title searches on Canoe Place; Culver genealogical documents 

Folder 4: photocopies of Southampton Town Records, Liber C; map, Upper Red Creek Road, 1919

Box 6
Folder 1: listings of burials in Good Ground Cemetery

Folder 2: genealogy and land files on Wick, Conklin, Wakeman, and Jessup

Folder 3: genealogy files on Southampton principal landowners

Folder 4: inventory of Southampton Town record books; index to Liber B

Folder 5: inventory of Southampton Town record books

Box 7
Folder 1: land survey by L.G. Squires of South Bay owned by Sarah Southgate. 1896 (Lot # 6 in the Canoe Place Subdivision)

Folder 2: chain of title for Lot #5 in the Canoe Place Division, May 2, 2004 including a map of property belonging to Chas. J. Hardy. Surveyed by L.G. Squires January 4, 1904.

Folder 3: map of Charles Hardy property; an intensive look at Lot # 4 in the Canoe Place Division

Folder 4: lot # 3 in the Canoe Place Division; White family history

Folder 5: historic chain of title

Folder 6: historic chain of title

Folder 7: Long Island Rail Road deeds for Canoe Place and Good Ground

Folder 8: Long Island Rail Road deeds for Canoe Place and Good Ground

Folder 9: early unrecorded Good Ground deeds at the East Hampton Library

Folder 10: Advantage Title research information on Canoe Place Inn

Folder 11: Advantage Title research information on Canoe Place Inn

Box 8
Folder 1: road research in the vicinity of Canoe Place

Folder 2: lawsuit, King and Warner, 1950

Folder 3: land deed, Daniel Terrell and Elias Howell, 1841

Folder 4: Joseph Thompson

Folder 5: Sally and Aaron Cuffee lands at Canoe Place

Folder 6: tax documents, Edward Hedges, Martin L. Wells and Barnabus Hubbard, 1915

Folder 7: history of Canoe Place Inn

Folder 8: copy, ecology writings

Folder 9: Warner and Fanning genealogy

Folder 10: Good Ground name change to Hampton Bays

Folder 11: copies of Canoe Place land deeds  

Box 9
Folder 1: scans of original Southampton Town records and the creation of Canoe Place subdivision, 1738-1739

Folder 2: early land deeds in vicinity of Shinnecock Canal

Folder 3: assorted copies of early deeds and indentures

Folder 4: assorted copies of early deeds and indentures

Folder 5: assorted copies of early deeds and indentures (Hampton Bays Historical Society)

Folder 6: assorted copies of early deeds and indentures (Southampton Historical Society)

Folder 7: early copy of deed, Samuel Jogger and Canoe Place

Folder 8: versions of chain of title for Canoe Place division, lots 1, 2, 3

Folder 9: early deeds in Canoe Place division

Folder 10: copy William Mather map, Southampton, 1842

Box 10
Folder 1: gravestone information for Old South End Burial Ground, Southampton

Folder 2: Jacques family papers

Folder 3: early Southampton will research

Folder 4: early Southampton will research

Folder 5: “Early History of Canoe Place in Property,” By Henry W. Moeller

Folder 6: survey notes, widening of road near Good Ground

Folder 7: copy, Jonathan Fithian map, Canoe Place, 1848 (1884 edition)

Folder 8: Presbyterian church property, Sebonac, Town of Southampton

Folder 9: Huntington Library (California) research on Shinnecock Indians

Box 11
Folder 1: genealogical records and notes on Culver family and Culver deeds,  Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 2: genealogical records and notes on Culver family and Culver deeds,  Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 3: copy, Lawrence Wendell Squires “Railroad Surveying field book”

Folder 4: copy, Lawrence Wendell Squires “Railroad Surveying field book”

Folder 5: copy, Leverett Goldenbow Squires (1858-1938), surveyor of Good Ground Folder 6: report, Jack Campesi on habitation of Shinnecock Indians west of Canoe Place

Folder 7: Nixon and Peabody

Box 12
Folder 1: copy, 1829 David Burr map of Long Island and notes

Folder 2: copies, Howell family deeds for mill at Water Mill from Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 3: copies, Pelletreau family members from Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 4: copy, subscription for Southold Wharf, September 1786 from Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 5: copies, Culver deeds at Canoe Place; copies, Wick deeds at Canoe Place; copies, timber lots and Indian lands at Sebonac from Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 7: copies, Southampton deeds from Brooklyn Historical Society

Folder 8: correspondence on Southampton Town

Folder 9: files, Olde Towne subdivision, village of Southampton 

Folder 10: copy, State of New York Racing and Wagering Board vs. Shinnecock Indian Nation, 2007

Folder 11: map, original Old Town settlement area, 1997

Folder 12: articles by Henry W. Moeller

Box 13
Folders 1 to 9: documents, Canoe Place Chapel and burial grounds

Box 14
Folder 1: copies, files on Long Island churches

Folder 2: copies, files on Long Island churches

Folder 3: copies, files on Long Island churches

Folder 4: Southampton Town assessment rolls, 1800s

Folder 5: Southampton Town assessment rolls, 1800s

Box 15
Folder 1: copies, New York State laws and Indian lands

Folder 2: copies, New York State laws and Indian lands

Folder 3: copies, New York State laws and Indian lands

Folder 4: copies of deeds, Canoe Place Inn and Estates

Folder 5: copies of deeds, Canoe Place Inn and Estates

Folder 6: copies of deeds, Charles J. Hardy

Folder 7: copies of deeds, Charles J. Hardy and Nathaniel Jagger

Box 16
Folder 1: manuscripts, Squire Pond Journal

Folder 2: proceedings of the symposium on “The Ecology of the Fire Island and Great South Bay Area…,” 1963

Folder 3: “A Report of the History of the Herald House,” 1999

Folder 4: copy, 127 th regiment, New York State Volunteers, 1862-1908

Folder 5: copy, Civil War enrollments and statistics, Town of Southampton

Folder 6: copies and notes on Israel Conklin

Folder 7: copies and notes on Israel Conklin

Folder 8: copies and notes on Israel Conklin

Folder 9: copies, Jessup genealogy

Folder 10: bibliography, Roy Latham

Folder 11: Nixon and Peabody, re: Canoe Place deeds and roads

Folder 12: article on eel grass by Clarence Cottam

Box 17
Folder 1: photographs taken in 1979 of the Franklin shipwreck in Moriches Inlet (12 slides)

Folder 2: aerial photographs of Gardiner’s Island, circa 1975

Folder 3: photograph of the U.S.S. Constitution in Fort Pond Bay, Montauk, New York with naval cadets, circa 1890-1930

Box 18
Item 1: copy, 1818 assessment records, Town of Southampton

Item 2: illustration accompanying article on Plum Island and Gardiner’s Island, Picturesque America

Item 3: cover illustration, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper , January 20, 1877 depicting the wreck of the British ship Circassian in Bridgehampton, New York

Item 4: tracing made on exterior of Culloden : Roman numeral VIII

Box 19
Item 1: CITY/SCAPE, Cultural Resource Consultants. Olde Towne Site, old Town Road & Wickapogue Road, Village of Southampton: phase 1A literature review & sensitivity analysis and phase 1B archaeological field reconnaissance survey. White Plains, NY, 2006.

Item 2: GAI Consultants, Inc. Cultural resources survey of the Town of Southampton, New York. 

Final Survey Report. July 2000. GAI Project No. 99-150-10.

Item 3: Greeley-Polhemus Group. Cultural resources study, Fire Island Inlet to Montauk Point, Suffolk County, New York, reformulation study: phase 1 archaeological survey: draft report. v. 1-2. West Chester, Pa., April 1998.

Item 4: Southampton (N.Y.: Town).  Cattle earmarks, 1667-1688. Southampton, N.Y., [2008?].

Series 4: Artifacts 
Contains one modern, yellow rope used to gauge the depth of water during the archeological excavation of the HMS Culloden .  

Box 20
Modern yellow rope used for the archaeological excavation (1 item)

Series 5: Maps
Contains facsimiles and copies of maps with an emphasis on the Town of Southampton.

Box 21, section 2 (oversized)

Item 1: copy, map of property to be conveyed by Pratt Estate situate Hampton Bay, Suffolk County, New York, October 1952

Item 2: copy, map of Newtown Road, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, November 1920

Item 3: copy, map of Canoe Place Inn property owned by Julius Keller situate Canoe Place, Suffolk County, New York, surveyed May 26, 1926 by C.W. Baird

Item 4: copy, map of Hampton Bays School District map, approved February 4, 1939. Based on maps, surveys and office data made by L. Wendell Squire and retraced by C. W. Baird, June 1938

Item 5: copy, map of property owned by estates of Charles J. and Virginia Taylor Hardy situate Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, circa 1956-1960

Item 6: copy, map of Hampton Bays, L.I. and vicinity, Frank M.RE, 1958

Item 7: copy, Shinnecock Hills, Southampton, L.I. plan for subdivision of part of property of Shinnecock Hills and Peconic Bay Realty Company, 1907.  This map shows the earliest footprint of Canoe Place Inn.

Item 8: copy, map showing proposed improvement of highway situated at Canoe Place, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, L. Wendell Squire, 1916; map showing section of South Country Road situate at Canoe Place, Town of Southampton, New York, L. Wendell Squire, 1922

Item 9: copy, school districts 9 and 10 boundaries

Item 10: copy, section of topological map, Town of Southampton, 1904

Box 22 (oversized)

Item 1: copy, section of Hampton Bays. Atlas of Suffolk County, Belcher and Hyde, 1902

Item 2: copy, map of property belonging to R.J. Hearne situated in Suffolk County, surveyed by L.G. Squires, November 5, 1902

Item 3: topographical map of Israel Conklin and Jeremiah Culver properties

Item 4: copy, map of the land of Leander Squires and Samuel W. Squires, April 4, 1887

Item 5: copy, map of Hampton Bay Heights, Hampton Bays, Suffolk County, New York, surveyed by J.W. Baird, 1926

Item 6: copy, easterly portion of Canoe Place subdivision, Town of Southampton, November 17, 2004

Item 7: copy, station map, lands, the Long Island Rail Road Company, Montauk Division, June 30, 1916

Item 8: copy, map of property owned by Mrs. Frank Downs situate Shinnecock Indian Reservation, Town of Southampton, Long Island New York, Theodore F. Squires, May 1, 1944

Item 9: copy, subdivision map of section no. 4 Landing Estates situate Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, 1960

Item 10: copy, right of way and track map, The Long Island Rail Road Company, Montauk Division, corrected 1929

Item 11: copy, map of Red Creek Road, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, D. Young, surveyor, undated

Item 12: superimposed 1870 Long Island Rail Road map on 20 th century Town of Southampton zoning map

Item 13: copy, 1930 aerial survey, Town of Southampton, Shinnecock Canal

Item 14: copy, map of property situate northerly of Hampton Bays, Long Island, New York, Wallace H. Halsey, 1938 and revised by Theodore F. Squires, 1941

Item 15: copy, map showing proposed west branch of Newton Road with connecting roads situate in the Village of Hampton Bays, Southampton Town, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York surveyed by L. Wendell Squire, October 9, 1929

Item 16: copy, sketch plan minor subdivision of Sarah G. Holzman, Hampton Bays, December 22, 1996

Item 17: copy, map of property owned by Charles J. Hardy Esq. situate Hampton Bays, Long Island, New York, Wallace H. Halsey, 1931

Item 18: copy, map of Canoe Place Road, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, Wallace H. Halsey, March 9, 1932

Item 19: copy, map of Red Creek Vistas situated at Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, April 2005, revised July 2005

Item 20: copy, map showing proposed improvement of roads leading to Ponquogue Bridge, Ponquogue, Long Island, New York, Wallace H. Halsey, May 23, 1929

Item 21: copy, map of part of property owned by canoe Plane Inn, Inc. situate canoe Place, Hampton Bays, August 12, 1929

Item 22: copy, Town of Southampton mile markers, 1997

Item 23: copy, subdivision map of section no. 1 Landing Estates situate Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, New York, 1953

Item 24: copy, map of Sag Harbor, Long Island published by Wall and Forrest, 1854

Item 25: copy, map of property situate Hampton Bays, Long Island, New York, Theodore F. Squires, February 9, 1951

Item 26: copy, map of division Hampton Pine Beach, Inc., Town of Southampton, Hampton Bays, Suffolk County, New York, 1929

Item 27: copy, map of Squires West landing Road, Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, New York surveyed by C.W. Baird, June 1925

Item 28: copy, amended map “A” sub-division map of Shinnecock Canal Park situate Hampton Bays, Suffolk County, New York surveyed by C.W. Baird, April 1926

Item 29: copy, map of New Road at Squiretown, Long Island survey made by L.G. Squires, February 17, 1893

Item 30: copy, map showing extension area of the Hampton Bays Fire District situate in Southampton Town, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York, prepared by L. Wendell Squire, October 8, 1954

Item 31: copy, map showing a part of the Squiretown Road with new alignment near the North End situate in the Village of Hampton Bays, Southampton Town, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York surveyed by L. Wendell Squire, September 23, 19371937

Item 32: copy, part of Good Ground and Canoe Place, E. Belcher Hyde, 1916

Item 33: copy, subdivision map of section three of Holzman Estates situate Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, October 1964

Item 34: copy, map showing section of road at Canoe Place, Suffolk County, New York as surveyed by L.G. Squires, 1897 (E.A. Buchmueller)

Item 35: copy, map showing alteration of South Highway, Shinnecock Hill, Long Island surveyed by Seth J. Raynor, November 20, 1912 (shows traverse across canal before bridge was built

Item 36: copy, section of Newtown Road depicting boundary of C.J. Hardy property and T.L. Jacques, undated

Item 37: copy, final plat of Driftwood Landing, Hampton Bays, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, 1994

Item 38: copy, map showing proposed improvement of highway situated at Canoe Place, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, L.W. Squire, August 14, 1916; copy, map showing section of South Country Road situate near Canoe Place, Town of Southampton, Suffolk County, New York, L. Wendell Squire, September 26, 1922

Item 39: map commemorating the Town of East Hampton (N.Y.) bicentennial, 1776-1976 ; cartography and general research by Thomas M. Thorsen, Town Planner; place name research by Norton W. Daniels; special consultant consultation and review by Carleton Kelsey, Town Historian; bicentennial and town seals designed by Frank Borth.  May 7, 1976

Item 40: map, Fort Pond Bay, N.Y. to Accompany Report Upon Survey Submitted Pursuant to River and Harbor Act of March 3, 1925; April 25, 1928.

Series 6: History of the Archaeological Excavation and Conservation of the HMS  Culloden 

Prepared by Dr. Henry W. Moeller.

The Culloden shipwreck (1781) at Culloden Point in Montauk, New York is a world class nonrenewable resource in the Town of East Hampton, New York .The shipwreck is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is one of twelve Royal Navy ships of the line lost during the American Revolution throughout the world. A more thorough description of British warship losses is provided in the attached publication. The original purpose for taking the photographs was to document the discovery and subsequent archaeological activities that took place on this wreck site.

A secondary objective was to document artifacts during the period they received conservation treatment in my laboratory. Finally a number of photographs were used in preparation for a 2004 exhibit of the shipwreck at Clinton Academy in East Hampton, New York. While they were given permission to use my photographs for the exhibit, no rights were given to them for subsequent use.

“Henry Moeller Diary Notes HMS Culloden, 1965-2009”
Updated July 4, 2017

September 1965
Henry W. Moeller was hired as an Instructor in Marine Science at Southampton College, Long Island University. His immediate superior, Dr. Jay Barton encouraged him to form a college diving club. The college purchased diving equipment and Moeller’s students formed a dive club called the Dolphins. Henry Moeller joined the Suffolk Sub Mariners. The Suffolk Sub Mariners club was made up of local divers from the eastern end of Long Island. The Suffolk Sub Mariners invited the college diving club to join their dive club. They did! Active divers from the east end were Jack Phillips, Paul Knight, David Warsen, Robert Miller, Tony Pagan, Don Getz. Carl Davidson joined this club at the end of the time when it met at Southampton College. The Sub-Mariner club met in the evening in Moeller’s laboratory at Southampton College. Years later we met at a Newsday office in Riverhead. Moeller at one point served as President of the Suffolk Sub Mariners probably when it was meeting at the Newsday office in Riverhead. There was much talk about the discovery of the Culloden at the Suffolk Sub Mariners meeting. The minutes kept by the club secretary would be an excellent source of documentation on the topic. Don Getz was a member of the Dolphin dive club while he was an undergraduate student at Southampton College. He presently is captain of a research vessel at Southampton College. Don Getz works out of the Marine Station! He was also a member of the Sub Mariners and is familiar with the details of the discovery of the Culloden by Moeller. He was also present at the Suffolk Sub Mariners club meetings when the topic was discussed.

December 1965
Bob Smith, a student of Professor Moeller’s discovered an anchor and a lumber barge on the floor of Fort Pond Bay. The barge sank in October 1925. Moeller’s students wanted to excavate the anchor but did not have the diving skills. Moeller introduced the college divers to the Suffolk Sub Mariners. Collectively the Sub Mariners taught salvage techniques to the college students and they retrieved a large anchor. The anchor is now at the entrance to the marine station at Southampton College.

September 1969
Dowling College hired Henry Moeller as an Assistant Professor of Marine Science and Coordinator of the Marine Science Department. Henry W. Moeller also had a research appointment at the New York Ocean Science Laboratory in Montauk, New York. Moeller operated a research laboratory at the New York Ocean Science Laboratory. Dr. Algernon Churchill and Dr. Moeller built an underwater farm for the culture of Irish moss in Fort Pond Bay at Montauk. So the two spent a lot of time diving in the Fort Pond area. The research project was done through the Marine Science Institute at Adelphi University.

May 1971
While skin diving to collect Irish moss for the underwater farm Professor Moeller and Steve Fisher, a chemist at New York Ocean Science Laboratory (New York Ocean Science Laboratory) came across wooden wreckage of the Culloden . After the discovery, Moeller invited Robert Miller (a Suffolk Sub Mariner member who was working at the New York Ocean Science Laboratory as a contract painter) at the time and David Warsen (a Suffolk Sub Mariner member and a recreational diving partner of Moeller) to go to the Culloden wreck site. Steve Fisher, a chemist at New York Ocean Science Laboratory also joined the team. Moeller, Fisher, Miller and Warsen took David Warsen’s aluminum boat and left from the New York Ocean Science Laboratory pier. During the dive Moeller found flint between the wooden pieces of Culloden wreckage. David Warsen discovered a brass gudgeon with the name Culloden misspelled on the back of it. Moeller using his underwater camera photographed the Culloden underwater. He also photographed Bob Miller and David Warsen with the newly found gudgeon at the New York Ocean Science Laboratory pier. Moeller has photographs of expedition. In subsequent dives that summer the same team found a second gudgeon still attached to a fragment of the original wooden rudder. The brass gudgeon was found between the New York Ocean Science Laboratory pier and Perry Duryea’s dock. David Warsen and Moeller helped Bob Miller bring the rudder and brass gudgeons ashore. Our club had a rule. Finders/ keepers. Since Bob Miller found it, it belonged to him. Several years ago Moeller was at the 72’s dive shop and saw the gudgeon. It had a 3x5 card identifying the artifact. Miller had loaned or given it to the dive shop. At about the time we found the last gudgeons, Moeller began to realize it was wrong to be removing objects of archaeological value without documenting findings and tried to encourage his diving partners to donate them to a museum. This is where a rift began to develop. Moeller spoke to Mrs. Jeannette Rattray, editor of the East Hampton Star and Director of the East Hampton Marine Museum. Moeller encouraged her to try to encourage Bob Miller and Dave Warsen to give the artifacts to the marine museum. This is how Mrs. Rattray learned about the Culloden .

August 5, 1971
East Hampton Star had an article entitled “ Culloden Wreck Identity is Definite,” Volume LXXXVI, Number 47, page 1. The newspaper cited Dave Warsen and Bob Miller but omitted Henry Moeller and Steve Fisher. Henry Moeller was in Bimini at the time - at the Lerner Marine Laboratory. Dave Warsen and Bob Miller omitted Moeller’s name. This was done as a joke.

June 6, 1972
Henry and Barbara Moeller were invited to dinner at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Rhodes who resided on Main Street in Sag Harbor, New York Gene Rhodes arranged for Professor Moeller to meet Mr. John Lindenbush, Executive Secretary of the Long Island Historical Society in Brooklyn, New York. Mr. Lindenbush was very well acquainted with underwater archaeology and he told Moeller of the harm amateur divers were doing to archaeology. He also told Moeller it was illegal for the New York Ocean Science Laboratory group operating out of Moeller’s lab to be removing artifacts from underwater sites without a permit. He encouraged Moeller to raise the level of consciousness in marine archaeology and to provide leadership.

June 7, 1972
John Lindenbush wrote to Louis Tucker, Office of State History in Albany, New York, about the Culloden wreck site. A copy of the letter is in my correspondence file. The letter is important because it urges the New York State Museum to develop a dialogue with responsible parties

June 8, 1972
John Lindenbush writes to Mr. Gene Rhodes. His copy of the letter is in my correspondence file.

July 13, 1972
Henry Moeller hires Paul Knight to dive for the New York Ocean Science Laboratory. Byron Porterfield, one of the New York Ocean Science Laboratory employees arranged for Mr. Les Behan to use his vessel the Peconic Queen and its underwater sonar to look at the waters in the vicinity of the Culloden . Due to fog we were unable to study the wreck site and the mission was temporarily shelved. Henry Moeller paid Paul Knight out of personal funds for the aborted mission.

April 15, 1973
Henry Moeller submitted a grant proposal to the New York State Museum and Science Service seeking funds for Dowling college students to begin documenting the archaeological items at the Culloden wreck site thru the New York Ocean Science Laboratory. A copy of that grant application is in my correspondence file. A request was also made to obtain permit application through the office of Dr. Paul Scudieri. To the best of our knowledge Professor Moeller was probably the first person to ever apply for an underwater archaeological permit and this got the New York State museum people in a tizzy. Grant application was never funded. Concept of students doing underwater archaeology for the summer was alien to museum people.

August 14, 1973
Carl Davidson is recorded as finding a cannon at Culloden wreck site. See East Hampton Star LXXXXIX Number 4.

September 29, 1973
Carl Davidson and Paul Knight (best friend of Henry Moeller) excavate cannon.

September 30, 1973
Henry Moeller went to the Star Island Yacht Club in Lake Montauk to observe the Culloden cannon oxidizing in the atmosphere. The New York Ocean Science Lab administration informed Moeller about the illegal excavation.

October 1, 1973
Telephone call was made from John Biairdi’s office (President of New York Ocean Science Laboratory) to Paul Scudieri, archaeologist in New York State Museum in Albany, New York). The New York Ocean Science Laboratory off ice reported that a cannon had been excavated on the Culloden site. The administration also stated that New York Ocean Science Laboratory had gone through a procedure at Scudieri’s office to obtain a permit for the Culloden . Moeller said that New York Ocean Science Laboratory had withheld excavation until such time as we had both the funds and legal jurisdiction to do so.

October 2 and 3, 1973
Newsday articles

October 4, 1973
East Hampton Star, article on Culloden canon, LXXXIX, number 2. Cites Davidson and Knight excavation.

October 4, 1973
Office of General Services in Albany sends Henry Moeller a letter ordering him to stay off of Culloden site until permit is awarded.

October 10, 1973
Office of General Services in Albany sends Culloden permit application materials to Henry Moeller.

October 11, 1973
Henry Moeller writes article for East Hampton Star in letter to editor section about Culloden wreck.

October 15, 1973
Henry Moeller submits necessary information as requested by Charles Jennings, Office of General Services in Albany for a permit for the Culloden .

October 18, 1973
Moeller’s “Letter to the Editor” is printed in the East Hampton Star.

October 23, 1973
Letter from Myron Davis to Paul Scudieri.

November 6, 1973
New York Ocean Science Laboratory seeks funds for preservation of Culloden cannon.

November 7, 1973
Communication from Mr. Flanagan, Office of General Services stating permit application is under study.

November 14, 1973
Henry Moeller signs permit agreement for Culloden and it is notarized by Andrew Vissicchio Jr. at New York Ocean Science Laboratory.

November 26, 1973
Gen Willard, Administrator at New York Ocean Science Laboratory writes to John Woog, New York Ocean Science Laboratory attorney. He is asked for legal advice about Culloden .

December 13, 1973
Mr. Flanagan, Office of General Services State Education Dept. Albany, New York sent permit to map and photograph Culloden wreck site to New York Ocean Science Laboratory.

December 17, 1973
Henry Moeller received communication from Perry Duryea’s office (Mr. Duryea was Speaker of the New York Assembly and lived in Montauk. He was a personal friend of Carl Davidsons. Message delivered to Moeller from aide, William Carew. Communication- recommends cooperating with Carl Davidson if that was possible.  

December 18, 1973
Henry Moeller writes Carl Davidson a letter suggesting cooperation.

December 27, 1973
Meeting in Perry Duryea’s office. In attendance were William Carew, Gene Rhodes, Carl Davidson, Paul Knight and Robert Miller. Professor Moeller made a tape recording of entire meeting. From the tape, a typewritten copy of the meeting was made. Moeller has not listened to the tape or read the proceedings in many years but subject was cooperation. The meeting was acrimonious. Carl Davidson, Bob Miller and Paul Knight took position that they were highly trained professional divers and able to do salvage. This was true! Henry Moeller took the position that New York Ocean Science Laboratory was better equipped to do chemistry and conservation of artifacts and to do archaeological documentation of shipwreck site. Moeller came from a family that were boat builders. Moeller worked as a young man in his family boat building business but admittedly was far less experienced as a diver. Moeller argued that documentation skills were far more important than salvage skills.

Gradually the wheels of government began to turn and in 1974 the Culloden cannon was removed from Carl Davidson’s home and taken to East Hampton. New York Ocean Science Laboratory chemist, Dr. James Alexander did conservation chemistry. West Point cadets visited Moeller’s lab and surveyed surrounding wreck site. West Point cadets participated in surveying area. Moeller was not permitted to be involved with preservation of cannon by New York Ocean Science Laboratory administration. Monies supplied by East Hampton Town were given to Dr. Alexander for conservation chemistry work. No money was given to Moeller. He was not invited to photography session where Paul Scudieri, Elizabeth Fallon and Dr. Alexander took possession of cannon.

In December 1974 an article entitled "The Search for the Culloden " was printed by the American Museum of Natural History. The journal name was Natural History . The article was written by Henry Moeller. The article was written after Carl Davidson lectured at Dowling College about the Culloden cannon. Professor Moeller at the time of the lecture was eligible for tenure. Moeller took the academic position that shipwrecks of antiquity should be preserved for future generations. Davidson took the position that shipwrecks of antiquity could be salvaged by experienced and professional divers. Moeller took the position that archaeological sites should be studied by scientists. The academic reasons for the dispute were made public in the Natural History article and in the press. The publication received national and international acclaim. It was a very difficult time for both Carl Davidson and Henry Moeller.

In 1976 for the Bicentennial Celebration the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded Henry W. Moeller a grant (summer stipend) to excavate the Culloden wreck site.

November 18, 1976
Three young men (Robert Osinsky of Hauppauge, New York. was one of them) summered at Montauk and lived in a cottage west of the Lake Montauk jetty. While diving they found a gudgeon from the Culloden near the Lake Montauk rock jetty. Before bringing the artifact to the surface, they took a hacksaw and cut the artifact into three pieces. One piece was adorning a basement bar at a home in Hauppauge the other two pieces were resting on a garage floor when we first discussed the issue with them. The young men were going to sell the brass artifact to a junk dealer for scrap metal. Our team found out about it and we encouraged them to give it to the East Hampton Marine Museum rather than to sell it for scrap metal. There was a story about this in the East Hampton Star. We are unable to locate the newspaper article at the moment

Henry Moeller nominated the Culloden wreck site for the National Register. The Moeller nomination was withdrawn and Mary Fallon, the supervisor in East Hampton nominated the wreck site a second time. A number of years later the wreck site was placed on the National Register.

Professor Moeller and his team spent two summers conducting an archaeological excavation of the Culloden wreck site. The Moeller team photographed and documented the Culloden wreck site. Then seven years were spent doing conservation chemistry for the artifacts. It was very easy to obtain funds for excavation work but almost impossible to obtain funds for conservation chemistry. Thousands of hours of conservation work were done by Professor Moeller, his student and friends, who were interested in conservation chemistry. Ms. Elizabeth O’Donnell, a retired high school teacher and chemist worked in Moeller’s laboratory, and reported to him. She was a volunteer. When New York Ocean Science Laboratory closed, Moeller took his grant money and gave it to the East Hampton Marine Museum for O’Donnell to continue her work.  

She wanted to work independent of Moeller and when the grant funds were depleted Moeller would not raise any additional funds for her. She published on preservation chemistry with her daughter. No credit was given to the many people who volunteered their time! No state or federal funds were ever allocated for the archaeological excavation. Professor Moeller received funding from two wealthy patrons. The patrons were Dr. William Heroy and Arthur Skodnek. The artifacts when they were conserved were placed in the East Hampton Marine Museum. They were inventoried by the State of New York and accepted as part of their museum holdings.  

October 1981
Suffolk County awards Henry Moeller a Suffolk County Heritage Award. The Culloden wreck site was then converted into a New York State Park. In order to raise the necessary funding the public were led to believe that once the park was purchased the wreck site would become an underwater park for divers so that they can learn about underwater archaeology. Once the State and East Hampton received the money for the park there was no further effort extended for the underwater park. East Hampton Town has done very little to protect the site and it is in jeopardy. The underwater site has been pillaged by the diving community. There have been unsuccessful efforts to remove the four remaining cannon (each weighing approximately 10,000 pounds).

Professor Moeller has been documenting shipwrecks on eastern Long Island since 1965. He has spent the last ten years using side scan sonar and mapping archaeological sites on eastern Long Island He has found a number of underwater archaeological sites. Should these sites be made public? Will these sites be preserved for future generations or will they be plundered like the Culloden ? Should this information be published and made public? Should this information be given to the New York Museum? What will the New York State Museum do with it?

Henry W. Moeller spent two winters in London during his sabbatical leave studying the Culloden and other shipwrecks of the Royal Navy. He studied at the British Library, the Public Records Office and the National Marine Museum in Greenwich. He is planning to publish on shipwrecks of the Royal Navy in North America.

Summary

Probably every lobster fishermen at Montauk knew where the Culloden wreck site was located. The Moeller discovery only brought public awareness to the site. Carl Davidson, in all likelihood learned about the Culloden from discussions at a Suffolk Sub Mariners meeting. Proof of that statement could be obtained if you could uncover the log book of the Suffolk Sub Mariners minutes. A ghost writer for Carl Davidson wrote a document which contains narration about the discovery of the Culloden . This document contains libelous information about Moeller. Moeller has a copy of the document and has consulted an attorney about it. Professor Moeller warned Mr. Davidson that if his document was published, legal action would be forthcoming since it contained many false statements.

Moeller obeyed the law and stayed off the Culloden wreck site for a number of years after receiving orders from the New York Department of Education not to go on the site until a permit was received. In fact, Moeller was off the Culloden wreck site for so many years that he actually forgot where it was located. Davidson also ignored Section 233 of the State Education Law which states that no person should excavate an archaeological site underwater without permission from the Commissioner of Education.

The controversy that developed between Moeller and Davidson has taken place countless times around the nation. In retrospect Moeller and Davidson had much in common. It is a shame they could not have cooperated since Davidson is a talented, intelligent person. Unfortunately, Davidson pursued a course of action that put him in conflict with New York. State Education Law. Moeller abided by the law. Davidson believed the Culloden is a British warship and remains British property and is not owned by New York. Davidson could be correct.

When federal legislation for shipwrecks of archaeological value was passed in the 1990s the state of New York was requested to develop a master plan for their underwater archaeological sites. New York elected not to pursue that directive and are one of the coastal states that has not developed a strategy to preserve our underwater cultural heritage.

In May 2001, Isabel Furlaud, President of the East Hampton Historical Society requested Henry Moeller assist in the preparation of an exhibit of the Culloden artifacts at the Clinton Academy. Henry Moeller agreed and he spent one month preparing an exhibit that would be open to the public for the summer and fall of 2001. It was the first time that he had observed many of the artifacts now stored at the East Hampton Marine Museum in Amagansett, New York.

The majority of the artifacts have held up well following their conservation. No conservation steps have taken place in the intervening years by the New York State Museum. The only artifacts that have not held up well are the large cannon balls which have developed some cracks in them. It is apparent that they did not remain in the electrolysis treatment phase for enough time. I recommended Ms. Furlaud that the East Hampton Historical Society request funds for additional conservation work from the New York State Museum.  

April 2009
My wife and I attend the annual meetings of the Company of Military Historian in Albany, New York I met Dr. Paul Huey at the meetings. He informed me the Culloden artifacts formerly at the East Hampton Marine Museum had been transferred to the SHPO complex at Peebles Island, Waterford, New York. During our conversation I mentioned that these artifacts required periodic conservation chemistry. I volunteered to assist him in any way that I could.

September 14, 2009
Academic papers belonging to Henry and Barbara Moeller are being donated to Stony Brook University (State University of New York) in Stony Brook, New York. One group of papers in our collection relate to the Culloden shipwreck. The underwater survey, ship plans and photographs are being shipped with this diary.” 

Culloden Reference Sources

After the Clinton Academy Culloden exhibit a number of papers relating to the exhibit were placed in the Long Island Collection, East Hampton Library. Exhibit materials from the exhibit were also retained by the East Hampton Historical Society. 

Henry W. Moeller’s photographic collection related to the Culloden were given to the Special Collections Library at SUNY Stony Brook.

Henry W. Moeller’s papers from an archeological dig of the Culloden were placed in the Special Collections Library at SUNY Stony Brook.

Conserved artifacts from the Culloden excavation were given to the State of New York. For many years these  artifacts were on loan to the East Hampton Marine Museum. At the end of the loan period the Culloden artifacts were taken to a NY State Parks and Recreation facility at Watertown, New York where they remain as of this date (July 4, 2017).