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URECA Bulletin Board

* Note: The list below is only a small sampling of the opportunities available at Stony Brook. Many students find opportunities by contacting faculty directly by email.

Posted 2/26/19

The Lynch Lab for Quantitative Ecology (Ecology & Evolution Dept.) is looking for two undergraduate researchers to assist with a project using photo-identification to track Weddell seals around Antarctica. Our field team has collected hundreds of photos of Weddell seals and we have recently begun scraping the web for more photographs. We use the unique markings on each seal to identify individuals when they show up in different locations. The research assistant will assist primarily in our matching program - looking through our catalog of individuals to determine whether a seal has been previously sighted or is new to our database.

Interested undergrads should have an interest in ecology and a fine attention to visual detail, as this work relies on visual pattern matching between seals that are in different positions, lighting conditions, etc. Some experience with statistics and/or GIS a plus if interested in developing an independent student project out of the work. Students should be prepared to work 6-10 hrs per week during the term and are welcome to join our weekly lab meetings as well.

Have a look at  www.lynchlab.com for information about the lab and our research. If interested please submit a cover letter describing your academic interests and any research experience (or interest in research if no prior experience!) and a CV (including relevant coursework) to Alex Borowicz ( alex.borowicz@stonybrook.edu). Please include 'URECA' in the subject line of the email. 



Posted 2/8/19

The Preall Lab at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is seeking a motivated undergraduate summer intern to participate in a research project. The student will work within the Single Cell Analysis Core Facility at Cold Spring Harbor where they will learn to use laboratory techniques such as mammalian cell culture, molecular cloning, microfluidic encapsulation, and next-generation sequencing and apply these tools towards the characterization of clonally expanding immune cell populations in the tumor microenvironment. The student will also learn about lab techniques such as flow cytometry and single cell transcriptomics, and computational data analysis.  The ideal candidate will be highly self-motivated, and will contribute to the design and troubleshooting of a technically challenging, but highly rewarding project.

Requirements: 

  • Must be at least a junior in college 
  • Must have taken organic chemistry or completed an upper level biology lab class 
  • Excellent communication skills and willing to work as part of a team 
  • Available to work between 9-5 at least three days a week between May and August with flexible start and end dates 
  • Enthusiasm to tackle new challenges 
  • A car or ability to commute to the Woodbury campus at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (A CSHL shuttle is available from Syosset train station)
  • Lab experience preferred

Applicants should send materials to Jon Preall via email at jpreall@cshl.edu and should include: A cover letter; Resume; List of relevant coursework

 


 

Studying cancer genomes with CRISPR at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

The Sheltzer Lab at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is seeking undergraduate researchers for a cutting-edge project applying CRISPR to dissect drug targets in cancer. The position pays an hourly stipend. Cancer cells require the expression of certain genes, called “addictions” or “genetic dependencies”, that encode proteins necessary for tumor growth. Targeting the proteins encoded by these genes can trigger cell death and durable tumor regression. The Sheltzer Lab is applying CRISPR to study genetic dependencies in cancer in order to identify new therapeutic vulnerabilities and targets for drug development. Additionally, through CRISPR mutagenesis, we investigate the on-target and off-target effects of different cancer drugs, with profound implications for their clinical use.More information on some of our previous research can be found in these publications (written by previous Stony Brook undergraduates):

Lin, A., Giuliano, C.J., Sayles, N.M., and Sheltzer, J.M. (2017) CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis invalidates a putative cancer dependency targeted in on-going clinical trials. eLife, 6:e24179.
Giuliano, C.J., Lin, A., Smith, J.C., Palladino, A.C., and Sheltzer, J.M. (2018) MELK expression correlates with tumor mitotic activity but is not required for cancer growth. eLife, 7:e32838.

Position Requirements:
• Ability to work in the lab at least 12 hours a week (which can include evenings and
weekends, based on the student’s schedule).
• Ability to get to/from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (car is preferred).
• Strong analysis, organization, and communication skills.
• Prior laboratory experience in molecular biology is preferred but not mandatory.
• We are looking for a multi-semester commitment - Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors
are encouraged to apply.
More information can be found on the Sheltzer lab website: http://sheltzerlab.labsites.cshl.edu/.
Interested students should send a CV and cover letter to Dr. Sheltzer at sheltzer@cshl.edu.

More information can be found on the Sheltzer lab website: http://sheltzerlab.labsites.cshl.edu/. I nterested students should send a CV and cover letter to Dr. Sheltzer at sheltzer@cshl.edu.

Posted 1/2/19 - *THIS POSITION HAS BEEN FILLED as of 1/29/19.


 

The Turner Lab in the Department of Anatomical Sciences is seeking undergraduate researchers for a project examining large-scale patterns of neuro-sensory evolution in living and fossil crocodiles. This paleontological research relies on a growing dataset of conventional CT and microCT scans of fossil crocodylomorph skulls. Undergraduate researchers will be responsible for digital segmentation of these CT datasets and creation of digital 3D models of brain, inner ear, and trigeminal nerve endocasts.

Crocodylomorpha is reptile group that includes living crocodylians and their close extinct relatives. Crocodylomorph evolution spans over 230 million years and multiple mass extinction events. The group has evolved over four orders of magnitude in body size and into ecological and phenotypic diversity paralleling those of Cenozoic mammals. Due to their taxonomic and ecological diversity, crocodylomorphs are a model system for studying how the demands of major habitat and ecological shifts result in large-scale evolutionary transformations. Crocodylomorphs have undergone several transitions from terrestrial predators into pelagic (open ocean marine), semi-aquatic (near-shore and river), and herbivorous niches. Overall brain shape and the positional sensing system of the inner ear are two of many systems expected to change across these ecological shifts.

Position Requirements. Ability to work in the lab at least 6-10 hours a week (more lab time can be accommodated if desired). No prior lab experience necessary, but experience in comparative anatomy or vertebrate biology is a plus. Student researchers will be trained on the use of VGStudio and/or Avizo software. Strong communication, organization, and data analysis skills. Additional Info: Possibility for course credit exists, as does the potential for independent student projects.

More information can be found on the Turner Lab website: http://theturnerlab.org/.
Interested students should send a CV and cover letter to Dr. Turner at alan.turner@stonybrook.edu.

Posted 12/19/17

 


 

 

Cold Spring Harbor opportunities: (posted 10/19/17) The research of Dr. Lingbo Zhang’s Lab focuses on blood stem cell and cancer. The lab is interested in understanding how self-renewal of stem and progenitor cell is regulated under both normal and malignant conditions, and how the dysregulation of self-renewal process contributes to cancer maintenance during cancerogenesis and stem cell exhaustion seen in aging.The Lab is addressing these questions through utilizing both CRISPR/Cas functional genomic and chemical biology approaches to identify novel self-renewal regulators and metabolic vulnerabilities for blood stem and progenitor cells and to eventually control these molecular events to treat diseases. The Lab has recently identified multiple promising drug targets to treat blood cancers including myelodysplastic syndrome‎ (MDS) and acute leukemia, and a clinical trial based on one of these drug targets to treat drug resistant MDS is currently under preparation. Students who are interested in characterizing drug targets and developing novel therapeutics for blood cancers could contact Dr. Lingbo Zhang at  lbzhang@cshl.edu<mailto: lbzhang@cshl  (posted 5/11/17)


Opening with Stony Brook Rooftop Farm - please see  >>

 


 

Looking for an Electrical Engineer/Biomedical Engineer/Computer Science/Engineering interested in a PAID internship-like position with possible benefits eligible (including health insurance) in the Stony Brook University Department of Neurobiology and Behavior in the “Experimental Neurorehabilitation Laboratory” starting from January 2 cnd 2017 until Summer 2017, with the possibility of longer employment based on performance. The eligible candidate will work on engineering aspects (making electrodes, cables, working on lab servers, software related to signaling, etc) of our biomedical project. The ultimate goal of our research in the lab is to introduce interventions (electrical stimulation, rehabilitation, and pharmacology) after neurological disorders in animal models. The successful applicant will start ASAP for a pre-training period prior to official employment.

Required Qualifications: Minimum BS in Electrical Engineering or Biomedical Engineering or Computer Sciences or related discipline (or on-track to graduate by Spring 2017); Ability to demonstrate professional competence in research activities; Experience working with small parts soldering working under magnification; Familiarity with various computer programs such as MatLab, Programming, Word, Excel and Powerpoint.

Preferred Qualifications:  4+ years experience with various types of small electrical parts and cable building.Experience working in a Biology- or Neuroscience-based laboratory. Experience with other types of electronics (oscilloscopes, amplifiers, etc), computers and data management.

Duties: Fabricate custom-made electrode implants and cables. Help with experimental planning as related to electrical theory. Help troubleshoot and fix noise and other electrical issues. Help post-doctoral fellows and graduate students with experiments.Discuss data with lab researchers and PI. Training of undergraduate and graduate students

We offer:Extension of this position to long term employment (based off performance). Work on exciting state of the art novel scientific projects related to biomedical science. Advanced training opportunities.Work with researchers in lab on multiple projects. Travel to conferences for professional development.  Salary: Commensurate with experience

Required Applicant Documents: Resume/Curriculum Vitae; Two references

Application deadline: Please submit your complete application in English including your CV and references directly to the Search Committee Chair: prithvi.shah@stonybrook.edu.  Note, official title of position is adjunct faculty. (Posted 12/8/16)

 


 

 

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