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COVID accelerated existing trends that affect our teaching, research, collaboration and employment (both job opportunities and the job search). Many of these changes have led to special challenges for humanities and social science faculty. For example, what are the implications when the landscape changes overnight with on-line instruction in humanities fields? How does the shift toward the virtual affect how graduate students and hiring committees envision and prepare for the jobs of the future in academia and beyond? How do we sustain--and perhaps reimagine--the values of the humanities and social sciences in this changing environment?

Zoom registration is required for this event. Please click her to register.

                                            

 
Alfreda James Learner, analytical thinker, strategist, connector, mentor, and writer are recurring features of  Alfreda James’ wide-ranging service to Stony Brook students. Bringing the latest innovations in career education to PhD and masters-level students while still contributing to career education programs for undergraduates requires balance, stealth, and a sense of humor. She is a recipient of a Student Affairs Distinguished Service Award for Student Development and a SUNY CDO Award for Excellence in Programming. As a blog writer for  Inside Higher Ed, and former Communications Chair for the Graduate Career Consortium, her leadership in career education extends nationwide.
  Michael Rubenstein Michael Rubenstein is Associate Professor of English at Stony Brook University. He is the author of Public Works: Infrastructure, Irish Modernism, and the Postcolonial, which received the Modernist Studies Association Prize for a distinguished book and the American Conference for Irish Studies Robert Rhodes Prize for the Book on Literature. He is co-editor, with Sophia Beal and Bruce Robbins, of a special issue of Modern Fiction Studies on "Infrastructuralism" and is currently working on a new book, Unaccountable Growth, which examines questions of economic, infrastructural, and characterological development in recent fictions from and/or about the Global South.