Engineering Summer Camp

 

A two week residential camp for students interested in doing research
in computer and electrical engineering.
 

Dates: July 7-18, 2014
Application Deadline: April 1, 2014 - Extended to April 10, 2014
Application: Engineering Summer Camp Application
Cost: $2200 residential
$1500 non-residential
Financial Aid:

Limited number of full-tuition scholarships are available to applicants who are eligible for the Federal free or reduced lunch program.  Please submit a letter, on letterhead, from an official at the school district or the letter you received stating that you are eligible for the free or reduced lunch program.

Instructor: Dr. Monica Bugallo
Eligibility: Students who will be juniors or seniors in the fall of 2014. Students with a strong background in math and science are recommended.
Lab Hours: Monday - Thursday

9:00am-5:00pm

  Friday 9:00am-3:00pm
     
Housing: For students who choose to live in a dormitory on the Stony Brook campus from Sunday through Friday; residential staff is available at all times. Students are dismissed Friday afternoons for the weekend.
Chaperones: Students will be escorted to and from and supervised during breakfast and dinner and all other activities on campus (including the laboratory, dormitory, library, computer facilities, gymnasium, on all field trips, etc.) with the exception of lunch.

Goal:  Introduce motivated high school students to the various fields in engineering.  Activities will include, but are not limited to:

  • Measure the speed of sound, which is an important task for applications like sonar; and
  • object localization which is the fundamental principle used in sophisticated applications like radar and GPS.
  • Fabricate a fiber voice link using a kit with components and printed circuit boards. Learn about a modern fiber optic communication system and various subassemblies, including a transmitter and receiver and then assemble the boards and test the link.
  • Build a metal detector using a kit. The assembled device can be used to detect metal pipes behind walls based on the principles of electromagnetic induction. 
  • Develop an embedded processing system for measuring temperature. Embedded processors are at the core of many modern applications, including mobile devices, multimedia, and robotics.
  • Build a temperature sensor system involv­ing embedded micro-processor based systems and VHDL based digital systems.
  • Perform a series of experiments in which students will grasp the concept of frequency in everyday signals, mainly in speech and music. The experiments will be performed in real time, on dedicated digital signal processing chips, using a visual programming environment.  Audio clips and the students' own voices will be taken as inputs via microphones, and loudspeakers will be used as the main outputs. Preset oscilloscopes will be used to get a real-time visual concept of the outputs. The experiments will enable the students to create sound effects on their own.
  • Demonstrate the use of sensors and digital control of robot functions.

Seminars:  During their stay, students are granted the opportunity to learn about areas of scientific and engineering research from the Stony Brook faculty. 

Laboratory Tours:  To explore a range of scientific topics, students will tour various engineering research facilities on campus.

University Facilities:  Students participate in recreational activities (at the dorms, athletic fields, gymnasium and pool), and learn more about college life. 

Engineering Summer Camp Application


For additional information or questions, please call (631-632-9750) or e-mail (cesame@stonybrook.edu).

 

 

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