Skip Navigation
Search

BA in Globalization Studies and International Relations (GLI)

BA in Global Studies

The Globalization Studies and International Relations BA is a new interdisciplinary program that combines academic perspectives from the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering to study, research, and create knowledge on globalization and trans-regional issues. The program’s central objects of study are the emerging changes wrought to human communities by both historic and on-going processes of globalization. Globalization has brought a new level of complexity to traditional issues emerging from the interaction of human groups, cultural traditions, the environment, law, the economy and technology. This complexity has changed both the character of those traditional challenges and also enabled new potential solutions to them. The curriculum in this major encourages students to become critical examiners and engaged researchers of these interactions by focusing on global flows of commodities, traditions, diseases, knowledge, technologies, and people. Students will also focus on how these flows impact existing social, economic, and political inequalities.

As part of the BA, students complete a set of core courses that each combine theoretical and experiential components. Each student will choose a specific Global Interaction Area and a specialized Global Issues track. These will become the students’ areas and issues of expertise as they tackle the complex set of phenomena associated with globalization. Students are required to either participate in a semester Study Abroad program or to complete a semester-long internship in an institution, business, or government agency that engages directly with the student’s area and issues of specialization. 

The Globalization Studies and International Relations BA prepares future leaders in global policy-making, international service, diplomacy, and activism. The program will also prepare students to pursue graduate study in a wide variety of fields, from diplomacy and consulting to research journalism and social entrepreneurship.    

For more information, contact the Undergraduate Director of the Globalization Studies and International Relations Program, Dr. Andrea Fedi, at andrea.fedi@stonybrook.edu.

Click here for our GLI Courses List, and look for available electives inside the list of all classes offered at SBU in the Fall 2020, on campus and online Also, check the pages of the GLI program on the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Degrees and Requirements

Requirements for the Major and Minor in Globalization Studies and International Relations (GLI)

Requirements for the Major in Globalization Studies and International Relations (GLI)  

The major in Globalization Studies and International Relations leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Completion of the major requires 36-45 credits (depending on language competency possessed at start of Program).

All core courses must be taken at Stony Brook University.

All courses required for the Minor must be passed with a letter grade of C or better.

Required Courses 

1. Foundation Courses (15 credits)

GLI 211 Perspectives in Globalization Studies and International Relations
GLI 320 Global Cultural and Environmental Issues
GLI 330 Global Political, Economic Issues
GLI 340 Cross-Cultural Mediation and Conflict Resolution
GLI 450 Capstone Senior Seminar

 2. Language Study (9 credits):  9 credits above the 100 level, or demonstrated advanced competency, in one language other than English.

 3.  Global Areas and Global Issues (21 credits)

a. Global Interaction Areas (9 credits: 3 at the 100/200 level, 6 credits taken in upper division courses [300-400 level]). Choice of specific courses is made through consultation with the program advisor. 

Areas to be defined by student in consultation with the program advisor. These areas should be defined according to specific global flows and historic interrelations rather than as traditional geographical areas.

Some examples of these Global Interaction Areas (see Global Interaction Areas for courses): 

Pacific Rim (East-Asia, South-East Asia, East Russia, Australia, New Zealand, Western Americas)
Indian Ocean world (South East Asia, South Asia, Australia, East Africa)
Transatlantic (West Africa, Western Europe, North and South America)
Mediterranean (Southern Europe, Northern Africa, Middle East)
Eurasia (Central Asia, Europe)
Americas (North and South America, Caribbean)
Global Africa (Africa and African diaspora)
Larger Middle East (North-Eastern Africa, Middle East, Eastern Mediterranean, Arabian Gulf)

b. Specialized Global Issues (12 credits: 6 at the 100 and 200 levels, 6 at the 300 and 400 levels)

Choice of one of six clusters of coursework organized around a set of interrelated issues (see  Global Issues

Global Cities: Challenges and Realities of Accelerating Urbanization Processes
Human, Cultural, and Biological Migration: Global Diasporas and Ethnicities
Global Development and Sustainability: Environment, Well-Being, Economy, and Policy
Cultural and Political Representation: Global Narratives, Global Policies and their modes of dissemination
Inequalities: Gender, Race, Class and Disability in a Global Context
Transnational Corporations, Trans-regional Institutions: Markets, Institutions, and Policies

Requirements for the Minor in Globalization Studies and International Relations

The Globalization Studies and International Relations Minor provides a focused view of globalizing processes through the critical examination of a variety of disciplinary perspectives of the world's institutions, ideas, cultures, and historical traditions. Students develop the ability to examine the global and local repercussions of current social, cultural, political, and economic developments in the world by applying a combination of methods from the sciences, humanities, and social sciences. The curriculum encourages students to become engaged researchers in the global flows of commodities, ideas and people, and their impact over existing social, economic, and political inequalities. 

The Minor is open to all undergraduates regardless of academic Major or place of residence. As part of the Minor students will choose a Global Interaction Area and a Specialized Global Issue Track. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in study abroad programs. With the approval of the Program Advisor, credits earned for courses taken abroad may count toward fulfillment of the minor. In addition, the Minor is part of the Institute for Globalization Studies (IGS). Students are encouraged to actively participate in enrichment opportunities offered by the Institute.  

Declaration of the Minor

The Globalization Studies and International Relations Minor takes approximately 4 semesters (fall/spring) to complete. Students are encouraged to declare the Minor before the start of their sophomore year but no later than the first semester of their junior year depending on the target date of graduation. Students should consult with the program advisor as soon as possible and plan their course of study for fulfillment of the requirements. 

General GLI Minor Requirements

Completion of the Minor requires 21-24 credits (depending on language competency possessed at start of Program).
All core courses must be taken at Stony Brook University.
All courses required for the Minor must be passed with a letter grade of C or better. 

Course Requirements for the Minor 

1. Foundation Courses (9 credits)

a. GLI 211   Perspectives in Globalization Studies and International Relations  

b. Two courses chosen from the following:

GLI 320 Global Cultural and Environmental Issues
GLI 330 Global Political, Economic Issues
GLI 340 Conflict Resolution, Coalition Building, and Peacemaking 

2. Two courses in a Global Interaction Area (6 credits: 3 credits at the 100/200 level, 3 credits taken at the 300 level). Areas must be defined in consultation with the Program Advisor and according to specific global flows and historic interrelations rather than as traditional geographical areas.

Some examples of these Global Interaction Areas (see Global Interaction Areas):

Pacific Rim (East-Asia, East Russia, Australia, New Zealand, Western Americas)
Indian Ocean world (South East Asia, Australia,
Transatlantic (West Africa, Western Europe, North and South America)
Mediterranean (Southern Europe, Northern Africa, Middle East)
Eurasia (Central Asia, Europe)
Americas (North and South America, Caribbean)
Global Africa (Africa and African diaspora)
Larger Middle East (North-Eastern Africa, Middle East, Eastern Mediterranean) 

3. Two courses on a Specialized Global Issue (see Global Issue Tracks; 6 credits: 3 credits at the 100/200 level, 3 credits taken at the 300 level):

Global Cities: Challenges and Realities of Accelerating Urbanization Processes
Human, Cultural, and Biological Migration: Global Diasporas and Ethnicities
Global Development and Sustainability: Environment, Well-Being, Economy, and Policy
Cultural and Political Representation: Global Narratives, Global Policies and their modes of dissemination
Colonial and Post-Colonial Globalizations: Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context.
Transnational Corporations, Trans-regional Institutions: Markets, Institutions, and Policies

4. Language Study (3 credits)

3 credits above the 100 level (or demonstrated equivalent competency) in one language other than English.

 

Global Interaction Areas and Specialized Global Issues

The electives listed in the sections below are indicative of the kind of courses that can be used for the creation of relevant clusters. More courses can be considered, subject to the approval of the Program advisors. The lists are updated once a year.

A. Global Interaction Areas

AFRICA AND AFRICAN DIASPORA  

ASIA  

EUROPE  

THE AMERICAS  

MIDDLE EAST: NORTH AFRICA AND SOUTH-WEST ASIA  

B. Global Issues Tracks 

HUMAN, CULTURAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MIGRATION: GLOBAL DIASPORAS AND ETHNICITIES  

  • ARH 329 Arts of the African Diaspora
  • EGL 217 -218 American Lit I, II
  • EGL 226 20th century American Literature
  • EGL 274 Black American Literature
  • EGL 249 African-American Lit and Music in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • HIS 397 Topics in History of US Immigration and Ethnicity
  • HUS 271 United States Latino Literature and Culture
  • SPN 445 Latin American Migration in Film 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY: ENVIRONMENT, WELL-BEING, ECONOMY, AND POLICY  

CULTURAL AND POLITICAL REPRESENTATION: ART AND MEDIA IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT  

INEQUALITIES: GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT  

TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS AND TRANSREGIONAL INSTITUTIONS: MARKETS, INSTITUTIONS, AND POLICIES