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  • AAS 211: AAS Topics in Social Sciences

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS

    Using the methodologies of the social sciences disciplines of history, political science, sociology, and economics, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American studies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter144630China: Science & Civilization Gregory RufOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AAS 212: AAS Topics in Humanities

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HUM

    Using methodologies of the Humanities disciplines, such as literature, linguistics, classics, cultural studies, philosophy, religious studies, art history and criticism, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American Studies. Topics may range from Women in Japanese fiction to Mahatma Gandhi's impact on politics and ethics. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter148330S. Asian Women Writers Rita NezamiOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AAS 260: Buddhism

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introduction to the basic philosophy and doctrines of Buddhism, beginning with a survey of lives and works of major historical figures of Buddhism. The principal issues of Buddhist thought, drawing from Indian, East Asian, and Western sources, are treated. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of faith, practice, and enlightenment in Buddhism. This course is offered as both AAS 260 and RLS 260.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter143630Mary DiazOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AAS 280: Islam

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter143730Mohsen SaberOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AFH 206: Great Books of the Black Exper

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: B SBC: HUM

    An exploration of some of the key writings from autobiographies to novels, etc., important to becoming familiar with central lines of thought and interpretation in the larger Black Experience. Focus and readings vary depending on each semester's emphasis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter146530Rita NezamiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AFH 249: Afro-Amer Lit, Music 19c & 20c

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: HFA+

    A detailed look at African-American literature and music and their importance for American literature and music of the 19th and 20th centuries. An examination of the literature with attention to the special stylistic devices, tones of literary voice, and characterization that writers use in their efforts to match the music experience with the written word. Selections from the recordings of African-American and African-American inspired musicians -- from Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong to Jimi Henrix and the Rolling Stones.This course is offered as both AFH 249 and EGL 249.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104930Tracey WaltersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AFH 282: Contemp. Carib Women's Lit

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: DIV; GLO; HUM

    Examines the political, social, and historical experiences of women from anglophone francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean nations. The readings, movies, and projects selected for the course highlight reccurent themes in Caribbean literature such as exile, migration, identity, colorism, slavery, sexual oppression, transnational motherhood, and identity politics. Feminist criticism, Postcolonialsm, and critical race theory will be applied to our reading of the texts. This course is offered as both AFS 282 and WST 282.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter146630Tracey WaltersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AFH 368: Carib/Ameri Connections in Lit

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    An exploration of the connections between writers from the French-speaking and English-speaking Caribbean and from the African-American community, who share a similar cultural heritage, historical heritage, and historical experience, but differ in geopolitical situations. Special attention is paid to spirituality, gender, and identity motifs in the literature. This course is offered as both AFH 368 and EGL 368.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter108830T OlosundeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AFH 385: French Caribbean Literature

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: HFA+

    A study of representative texts from the French Caribbean translated into English, focusing on literary manifestations of a search for a specific identity by writers from Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana, and Haiti. This course is offered as both AFH 385 and HUF 385.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter147901Elisabeth SpettelOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AFS 370: African-American Family

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: HFA+; USA

    The African-American family from the early 1800's to the present day. The nature and structure of that family, the obstacles it has faced, and its interrelationships with the African-American community and the diversity of American society.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104830Fahiym Abdul-WasiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 102: Elements of Statistics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    The use and misuse of statistics in real life situations; basic statistical measures of central tendency and of dispersion, frequency distributions, elements of probability, binomial and normal distributions, small and large sample hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, chi square test, and regression. May not be taken by students with credit for AMS 110, 310, 311, 312; ECO 320; POL 201; PSY 201; or SOC 202. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter112530Bakhtavar HagedornOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 103: Applied Math in Technology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: QPS; TECH

    Technologies that drive our modern world rely critically on applied mathematics. This course explores "How does it work?" for selected technologies that rely on mathematics and statistics, e.g., internet search, social networking, financial markets, online auctions, cell phones, DNA sequencing, GPS, Wii, Google maps, and more.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115130Jacob JonesOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 110: Probability & Stat Life Scienc

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: QPS

    A survey of probability theory and statistical techniques with applications to biological and biomedical situations. Topics covered include Markov chain models; binomial, Poisson, normal, exponential, and chi square random variables; tests of hypotheses; confidence intervals; tests; and analysis of variance, regression, and contingency tables. May not be taken for credit in addition to AMS 310. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter112630Bakhtavar HagedornOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 151: Applied Calculus I

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    A review of functions and their applications; analytic methods of differentiation; interpretations and applications of differentiation; introduction to integration. Intended for CEAS majors. Not for credit in addition to MAT 125 or 126 or 131 or 141 or 171. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter114530William BernhardOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 161: Applied Calculus II

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    Analytic and numerical methods of integration; interpretations and applications of integration; differential equations models and elementary solution techniques; phase planes; Taylor series and Fourier series. Intended for CEAS majors. Not for credit in addition to MAT 127, MAT 132, MAT 142, or MAT 171. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter113730Debneil Saha RoyOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 210: Applied Linear Algebra

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: STEM+

    An introduction to the theory and use of vectors and matrices. Matrix theory including systems of linear equations. Theory of Euclidean and abstract vector spaces. Eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Linear transformations. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 211.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter112830Hyun-Kyung LimOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 301: Finite Mathematical Structures

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: STEM+

    An introduction to graph theory and combinatorial analysis. The emphasis is on solving applied problems rather than on theorems and proofs. Techniques used in problem solving include generating functions, recurrence relations, and network flows. This course develops the type of mathematical thinking that is fundamental to computer science and operations research.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter117030Emma TalisOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 310: Survey of Probability and Stat

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: STEM+

    A survey of data analysis, probability theory, and statistics. Stem and leaf displays, box plots, schematic plots, fitting straight line relationships, discrete and continuous probability distributions, conditional distributions, binomial distribution, normal and t distributions, confidence intervals, and significance tests. May not be taken for credit in addition to ECO 320. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter112930Fred RispoliOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 315: Data Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: CER; ESI

    A continuation of AMS 310 that covers two sample t-tests, contingency table methods, the one-way analysis of variance, and regression analysis with one and multiple independent variables. Student projects analyze data provided by the instructor and require the use of a statistical computing package such as SAS or SPSS. An introduction to ethical and professional standards of conduct for statisticians will be provided.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115630Weihao WangOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 318: Financial Mathematics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: WRTD

    This course will focus on accumulation functions, yield rates, annuities, loan repayment, term structure of interest rates/spot rates/forward rates, options, duration/convexity. This course follows the syllabus for the Financial Mathematics (FM) Exam of the Society of Actuaries and prepares students to pass the FM Exam.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter116930Bakhtavar HagedornOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 335: Game Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SBS+

    Introduction to game theory fundamentals with special emphasis on problems from economics and political science. Topics include strategic games and Nash equilibrium, games in coalitional form and the core, bargaining theory, measuring power in voting systems, problems of fair division, and optimal and stable matching. This course is offered as both AMS 335 and ECO 355.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115830Marc Claveria MayolOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 361: Applied Calculus IV: Diff Equ

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    SBC: STEM+

    Homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear differential equations; systems of linear differential equations; solution with power series and Laplace transforms; partial differential equations and Fourier series. May not be taken for credit in addition to the equivalent MAT 303.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter117130Peng ZhangOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • AMS 394: Statistical Laboratory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: CER; ESI; EXP+

    Designed for students interested in statistics and their applications. Basic statistical techniques including sampling, design, regression, and analysis of variance are introduced. Includes the use of statistical packages such as SAS and R. Students translate realistic research problems into a statistical context and perform the analysis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1153L30Jiecheng SongOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ANP 202: People and Pups

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: STAS

    An introduction to the growing literature on dog evolution, behavior, and cognition to understand why dogs are so well adapted to socializing with humans and what role they play in our societies. This course provides students with a foundation in animal behavior, specifically dog behavior and human-canine relationships. Key questions will include: How do dogs communicate with each other and with us? Are dogs smarter than you think? And what is unique about the bond between people and their pups?

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter111530Ann MarkhamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • ANT 208: Zombiology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Zombie memes have become very popular in culture and media over the past several years. Many aspects of modern zombie lore, as represented in books, movies, and television programs such as The Walking Dead, are germane to understanding important issues in current affairs, science, and other topics of anthropological interest. In this class, we will use scenes from zombie media as prisms through which to examine topics such as the spread of infectious disease in our globalized and densely populated world, predation on humans, forensic analysis of trace evidence like tooth and cut marks, the collapse of civilizations, human behavior in small band societies, violent conflict, etc.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter105930Jason LewisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 106: Art & Science

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the complex relationship between art and science: their intertwined histories, values, technologies, and ways of interpreting the natural world. Analysis of specific visual and textual examples, as well as engagement of broader social and cultural concerns. Develops critical and creative thinking skills crucial for both the sciences and humanities.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter111130Jodi ZarkovichOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 107: Art & Medicine

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the intersections of visual art and medicine from antiquity to today. The course develops skills in observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection through the study of the medical body in visual art and the role of art in health care. Topics of study include anatomical imagery, medical illustration, dissection and display of human remains, gender and women's health, the representation of medicine as a profession, art activism, and art therapy.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter141730Daniel MenzoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 203: Arts of Asia

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: ARTS; GLO

    A general course on Far Eastern art covering India, China, and Japan from its beginnings to the present. Emphasis is on the major arts of painting and sculpture, with some reference to architecture.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129030Amy KahngOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 206: Modern Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the history of modern art, beginning with French Rococo and concluding with themes and concerns of a globally interconnected art world. Particular attention will be given to the rise of Modernism in Europe, the role of artists and artistic movements in social and political change, and the relationship of contemporary artistic practice to technology, social media and visual culture.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter108130Lauren FultonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 207: Digital Media: History/Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS; TECH

    An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129131Corinna KirschOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • ARH 208: History of Photography

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: ARTS

    A historical survey of the technical, theoretical, and aesthetic development of black-and-white and color still photography and its close interrelationship with the evolution of modern art.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter141830Catherine HowseOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 209: Arts of the United States

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: ARTS; USA

    An introduction to the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the late colonial period to World War II. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding art's changing forms and meanings and its relationship to crucial themes and developments in American history: the impact of national expansion, for example, and of immigration, urbanization, and modernization more generally. The course will also focus on the varied images of American society created by artists of diverse class, racial, and ethnic backgrounds.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter106130Elise ArmaniOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARH 391: Topics in Global Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: GLO; HFA+

    An in-depth exploration of a particular theme, movement or approach to transcultural artistic forms and practices. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter142530VIolence In Art/History Jinyoung JinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARS 105: The Creative Process

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to the creative process in art making and conceptual tools for understanding the visual arts from the perspective of the artist. Students learn about various methods, terms and approaches of the creative process through demonstrations, lectures and discussions on related themes. By placing art in context of today's issues, this course enables students to gain insight into the significance of creativity in its many physical and intellectual manifestations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter142830Izumi AshizawaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARS 225: Introduction to Digital Art

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS; TECH

    A hands-on introduction to the use of computers in the fine arts. Students explore image creation/manipulation, digital publishing and moving image through lecture, lab and discussion. Emphasis is on the expressive potential of the technology. No prior computer experience is required. Study of the history and impact of digital media on the arts and contemporary culture contextualize practical assignments. This course serves as preparation for further study in electronic media. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter112030Qin HanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter1121L30Qin HanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter134031Heather WestonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter1341L31Heather WestonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARS 281: Introductory Photography

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS; TECH

    An introduction to the creative techniques and visual grammar of contemporary photographic image production. This course presents core camera operations, lens-based techniques, and software applications used in digital image processing and output. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Estimated cost of supplies is $450, in addition to the course fee.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1452L30Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter1491L31Dilge DilsizOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ARS 327: Digital Arts:WebDesign&Culture

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An exploration of the practice and history of art on the Internet through lecture, project production, discussion and critique. Students create content for the web and mobile platforms while examining historical, and theoretical issues related to art and design on the Internet. Images, text, sound, and code are used to create web-based artworks and informational sites in response to course content. Emphasis is on creative use of current web technologies and software, as well as an examination of the cultural implications of the web. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter149601Carter JohnsonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter1497L01Carter JohnsonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BCB 599: MS Thesis Research in Biochemi

    Graduate 3-6 credits

    Thesis research will be conducted in the laboratory of a Biochemistry and Cell Biology or associated faculty member, including potentially an internship under the guidance of an approved mentor in the laboratory of a local biotechnology company. Student must identify and obtain permission to register from the sponsoring faculty member. Prerequisite: Matriculation in MS program or permission of instructor Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer, 1-9 Credits, S/U Grading

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1064S30TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BME 205: Clinical Chal 21st Cent

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SNW; TECH

    Technology used by current medical practice, focusing on weekly topics associated with a specific disease state. Technology used to diagnose and treat these disease states will be rigorously examined. Weekly topics will include: cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and organ transplant. Key disease states will be presented in physiological and cellular depth. This course may not be taken for major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter117230Mei Lin ChanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 115: Introduction to Business

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    The course provides a general framework for students to develop an understanding of how businesses work, how they are managed, and how different business models are applied to existing businesses in today's fast paced business environment. Introduces students to major business topics to form a foundation for understanding the general functional areas of business, the environment businesses operate in, and general principles of management and leadership. The course materials and coverage provides the fundamentals necessary for Business majors and minors understanding of more advanced business topics encountered in upper division Business courses while introducing students from other majors to the importance of business in the development of ideas into products and services and their distribution to customers through markets.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118730Richard LaskowskiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 301: Business Communications

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SPK; WRTD

    The purpose of BUS 301 - Business Communications is to provide Stony Brook College of Business undergraduates with a conceptual framework and specific tools for communicating in complex environments and accomplishing strategic academic and professional business goals. This core course provides, writing, oral and collaborative skills necessary for future business courses, internships, and professional positions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter119330Diane ImpagliazzoOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 326: Organizational Behavior

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    As members of many types of organizations throughout our lives, we are all affected at some time or another by their internal dynamics. These dynamics consist of the behaviors of individuals and students as they work and interact together within the organization. To help us best understand and address these issues, the field of organizational behavior has developed as the study of the behavior of individuals and students in organizations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter131830Amy MilliganOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • BUS 330: Principles of Finance

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    The goal of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and tools in finance. Upon completion of the course students should understand the role of a financial manager, be able to develop and analyze financial statements of a corporation, recognize the corporation's main sources and uses of funds, and develop understanding of the corporation's capital budgeting process.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118530Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 346: Operations Management

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Analysis and design of service and manufacturing systems. Topics include quality management, product and service design, process selection and capacity planning, design of work systems, inventory management, aggregate planning, material requirements planning, scheduling, waiting line model, just-in-time systems, and supply chain management.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter130030Michael HigueraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 353: Entrepreneurship

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Entrepreneurship is the study of new venture creation and management and it could occur in a myriad of ways depending n the interactions of entrepreneurs and opportunities. This course provides an overview of issues of creating a business, ranging from opportunity recognition and evaluation to resource acquisitions and management. It is designed to appeal to individuals with strong desires to become entrepreneurs, to join start up companies, or to work in the venture capital industry. The course objectives are threefold: 1) to develop a scientific understanding of entrepreneurship, and the empirical evidence in support of theories; 2) to transform this scientific understanding to practice; and 3) to provide firsthand experience with dealing with uncertainty and managing the start-up process.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118130Stefan DoeringOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • BUS 355: Investment Analysis

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Investment Analysis helps students make informed investment decisions in their personal and professional lives by providing a solid foundation of practical applications to introduce the topics and techniques used by investors and money managers. Course topics include: the investment environment, securities markets and transactions, finding investment data and information, return and risk, modern portfolio concepts, common stocks, analyzing common stocks, stock valuation, market efficiency and behavioral finance, fixed-income securities, mutual funds and exchange-traded funds.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118930Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 358: Marketing Research

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ESI

    Introduces marketing research tools that aid managers in marketing decision-making and how the marketing research process can be used to collect and analyze data and information to solve marketing problems. A strong applied orientation exposes students to marketing research in traditional areas such as market segmentation, product positioning, product design, brand perception, and sales forecasting, as well as emerging areas including customer satisfaction, customer relationship management (CRM), and on-line marketing.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter144530Peter CaprarielloOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 365: Financial Management

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ESI

    Financial management techniques and analysis for improving business decision-making will be explored. Topics include: Long and short term financial decisions, debt and equity funding, capital structure, net working capital, inventory management, account receivable management, and how to deal with financial distress related to reorganization and/or liquidation in bankruptcy. The basics of payout policy will be discussed including dividends and stock repurchases. In addition, students will learn how companies finance merger and acquisition decisions, including leveraged buyouts.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118830Thomas TallericoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 441: Business Strategy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Capstone course that builds on tools and concepts introduced in more specialized business courses and on students' general business knowledge. Includes: methods for analysis of forces driving competition; identification of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats faced by individual corporations; and practical strategies for enabling new or existing firms to compete successfully within an industry. Case studies and in-class situations challenge students to develop skills in handling multidimensional business problems.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118330Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • BUS 447: Business Ethics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: CER

    An introduction to traditional ethical theories and their application to business. A basis for understanding how ethical issues in business arise, and some strategies to control or resolve them, are derived from an examination of the work of philosophers and other writers relating to business ethics. Recent business case studies enable students to develop their own perspectives.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118030Richard LaskowskiOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CEL 597: Leading High Performing Teams

    Graduate 3 credits

    Exceptional leaders assemble and direct a team that maintains a high level of effective performance. This course examines how leaders leverage the dynamics of their teams to achieve their goals. Topics, such as team diversity of thought, creating a collaborative environment, establishing a shared vision, and facilitating effective self-motivation will be examined in depth. This course will be part of the Leadership badge in the MA in Liberal Studies program.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1294S30Edward DelgaizoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CHE 327: Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Techniques of isolating and handling organic substances, including biological materials. A one-semester course that provides a basic organic laboratory experience. It is recommended that students take CHE 327 at the same time as or immediately following CHE 322 or 332. Four laboratory hours and one lecture hour per week. Not for credit in addition to CHE 383. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter144030Zachary KatsamanisOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • CHE 693: Physical Chemistry Seminar

    Graduate 0-12 credits

    Fall and Spring,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1092S01Isaac CarricoOnline SynchronousTuesday03:00-04:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CHE 694: Biological Chemistry Seminar

    Graduate 0-12 credits

    Fall and Spring,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1093S01Isaac CarricoOnline SynchronousTuesday04:00-05:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CHE 696: Organic Chemistry Seminar

    Graduate 0-12 credits

    Fall and Spring,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1094S01Isaac CarricoOnline SynchronousTuesday05:00-06:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CME 160: Intro to Nano

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Many benefits of nanotechnology depend on the fact that it is possible to tailor the structures of materials at extremely small scales to achieve specific properties, thus greatly extending the materials science toolkit. Using nanotechnology, materials can effectively be made stronger, lighter, more durable, more reactive, more sieve-like, or better electrical conductors, among many other traits, with respect to their conventional counterparts. The emerging field of nanotechnology develops solutions to science and engineering problems by taking advantage of the unique physical and chemical properties of nanoscale materials. This interdisciplinary course introduces nanomaterials and nano-fabrication methods with applications to composites, coatings, transportation, construction, electronics and biomedical engineering. Basic concepts in research and design methodology and characterization techniques will be demonstrated.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter132030Steve NitodasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • COM 120: Fundamentals/Public Speaking

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SPK

    Focuses on the core principles underlying effective oral presentations and the development of effective presentations in public and professional settings. There is an emphasis on analyzing audiences, composing meaningful, coherent messages, conducting responsible research, developing effective arguments, and improving delivery skills to strengthen confidence and credibility. Students will develop skills that lay the foundation for success in future speaking endeavors in both professional and personal settings. This course will also focus on how to make critical judgments as an audience to public discourse. Upon completion of this course students will be more confident and effective speakers and listeners.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter146930TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter146930Christopher BillOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.01:30-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • COM 305: Mass Communication Law &Ethics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Provides students with a model by which they can analyze, understand, and act upon the law and ethical considerations that journalists and mass media professionals and consumers face in the 21st century. The class will use case studies, the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, the First Amendment Handbook from the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press, and current newsworthy stories to build an analytical model. This course is offered as both JRN 305 and COM 305

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter147330Richard RicioppoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • COM 503: Science Comm II

    Graduate 1 credit

    In this immersive science communication training, participants who have completed JRN 501 will continue their foundations in science communication with explorations into engaging with key audiences and the media, as well as creating a presentation accompanied by compelling visuals.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1454S01TBAOnline SynchronousFriday05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter1454S01Elizabeth BojszaOnline SynchronousWednesday05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CSE 301: History of Computing

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    A study of the history of computational devices from the early ages through the end of the 20th century. Topics include needs for computation in ancient times, development of computational models and devices through the 1800's and early 1900's, World War II and the development of the first modern computer, and early uses in business. Creation of programming languages and the microchip. Societal changes in computer usage due to the microcomputer, emergence of the Internet, the World Wide Web, and mobile computing. Legal and social impacts of modern computing. Cannot be used as a technical elective for the CSE major or minor. This course is offered as both CSE 301 and ISE 301.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter127530Richard McKennaOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • CWL 582: Prac. in Publish. and Editing

    Graduate 1-4 credits

    Under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students will be exposed to the hands-on process of editing and publishing a literary journal. Offered Fall, Spring, Every Year, 1-4 Credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and program director SEMESTER: On Demand

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1322S30Emma Walton HamiltonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
  • ECO 355: Game Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SBS+

    Introduction to game theory fundamentals with special emphasis on problems from economics and political science. Topics include strategic games and Nash equilibrium, games in coalitional form and the core, bargaining theory, measuring power in voting systems, problems of fair division, and optimal and stable matching. This course is offered as both AMS 335 and ECO 355.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter105830Marc Claveria MayolOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ECO 360: Money and Banking

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    An introduction to modern monetary institutions and mechanisms, their relationship to the economy, and governmental policies in this area.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter111730Yemiao KeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • ECO 389: Corporate Finance

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Introduction to the main concepts and problems confronted by financial managers in the corporate world. Development and application of tools and methods for financial decision-making and analysis, including: discounting and present value; asset valuation; investment criteria; risk and return; risk management; cost of capital; debt and dividend policies; international financial management.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter111930Sunghun ChoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EDL 503: Education Leadership Practice

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course helps to articulate the interrelationship between leadership theory and practice and promotes the philosophy that future school leaders should be pro-active. The course deals with administrative decision-making behavior in the context of a community. Students will use simulated materials that reflect the problems and issues of a school district. Political, social, and economic pressures, the educational needs and the establishment of high expectations for staff and students performance are considered, as well as the establishment of systems of rewards and recognition. The use of group dynamics in the decision-making process is emphasized. (formerly CEQ 503)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1398S30Antoinette MacLeodOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • EDL 541: School Building Leadership

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course focuses on the leadership and administrative roles of elementary and secondary school building leaders. Topics include: tasks of a building administrator; building organizations and staff utilization; curriculum development; evaluating the school or program performance and involving the staff in making changes; leadership; engaging teachers, staff, and parents in the decision-making process; facilities management; employee relations, student affairs; public relations; maintaining collaboration between the home and the school and school law. (formerly CEQ 541)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1350S30Jeffrey SoloffOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • EGL 130: Literature, Science&Technology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: CER; STAS

    This course introduces students to the status and role of literature as it engages with scientific and/or technological concepts. Students will consider the principles and concepts that form the basis of knowledge in the humanities and develop awareness of the contexts (historical, social, ethical and disciplinary) in which literature and scientific knowledge emerge. Students will also develop the verbal and written skills to articulate valid arguments on the relationship between literature, science and technology.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter105130Adam PoltrackOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EGL 192: Fiction: The Art of the Story

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: B SBC: HUM

    An analysis of fictional prose in terms of each section's specific theme. A goal of each section is to interpret various pieces of literature in relation to a political or historical view, or a particular literary technique. Descriptions available from the English Department. Not for English major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter110930Frank HarderOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EGL 194: Film: Mastering the Movies

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: B SBC: GLO; HUM

    Offers an introduction to film, including a basic familiarity with the terminology of film production and with techniques of film analysis. The course emphasizes critical viewing and writing, with attention to cinematography, editing, sound, narrative, authorship, genre and ideology. The course also offers an introduction to multiple cinematic traditions from across the globe.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter142230Hayden KindratOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter1407L30Hayden KindratOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ESE 300: Technical Communication

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Topics include how technical writing differs from other forms of writing, the components of technical writing, technical style, report writing, technical definitions, proposal writing, writing by group or team, instructions and manuals, transmittal letters, memoranda, abstracts and summaries, proper methods of documentation, presentations and briefings, and analysis of published engineering writing. Also covered are the writing of resumes and cover letters.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115730Ronald MargeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EST 100: Multimedia Projects

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    This course introduces computer applications and a selection of multimedia tools and the skills necessary to be successful in today's digital world including the creation of digital graphics, animations, and the production of audio and video using multimedia tools like: Dreamweaver, Flash, Photoshop, and Jing. Students will learn effective information presentation skills using Microsoft Office Suite and Wikis, blogs and other social media tools. The course emphasizes the use of multimedia research, application, design and presentation skills. Participation in weekly computer labs are required.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115230Matthew HenigmanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EST 105: Dig. Gen: Social Media Skills

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Students today face many challenges keeping up with technology trends and the skills necessary to be successful in the digital world. In this course students will develop the 21st century skills necessary to become effective lifelong learners leading to a successful career. We will explore a number of topics including information literacy, digital citizenship, understanding social media, collaborative environments and cloud based applications as we as organizing your digital world. The culminating activity for this course is the creation of a personal technology learning and management plan showcasing the tools and skills learned throughout the course.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter149030TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EST 106: Dig. Gen.: Prof. Web Presence

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Creating a positive digital profile can be a challenging task for the 21st century student. In this course, learn how to utilize the power of the Internet and social media to enhance your web presence and digital profile. We will explore a number of topics including building a strong web presence, leveraging social media, creating and uploading video content, blended and distance learning as well as mobile devices as a learning tool. The culminating activity for this course is the creation of a positive and sustainable web presence and digital profile.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129230Albert PisanoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EST 201: Technological Trends in Societ

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Explores the impact of technology and engineering design on society past, present, and future. The main themes as they relate to changing technology are: industry and the economy; the environment; social, educational, and psychological implications of computers; energy and society; warfare; and 21st-century emerging technologies.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter112430Edwin TjoeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EST 320: Communication Tech Systems

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Emphasizes basic science and engineering concepts underlying design and usage of modern telecommunications systems. Considers effects of human factors and societal constraints on design and development of nascent technological systems. Includes the electromagnetic spectrum, analog and digital signals and resonance as well as societal considerations of government regulations, international competition, and environment.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter113930Matthew HenigmanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • EST 325: Technology in the Workplace

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    A study of automation and information technologies in both manufacturing and service industries. Considers how technology is changing the work and lives of everyone from production workers to executives. Case studies are used to understand how technology can improve quality and productivity and how incorrect use produces disappointing results.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter113130Rita Reagan-RedkoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • FIN 545: Cptl Mrkts

    Graduate 3 credits

    Financial institutions and capital markets form the basis of the financial system in our global economy. Capital markets are the conduits in which capital flows through financial institutions to a network of organized and over the counter markets. Students will learn how many of these markets work in tandem to propel our economy forward. Topics include money markets, foreign exchange markets, derivative markets, the banking industry and the business of banking. The role of money in the capital markets and a variety of financial products offered by financial institutions will be explained. Prerequisite: MBA 502 Fall

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter119130Thomas TallericoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • FLA 439: Tech Lit for Lang Teachers

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: TECH

    Technology as a transformative drive of new literacies is no longer an option but a requirement in every aspect of education today. FLA 439 is designed as a course to help teacher candidates explore in a very hands-on, practical and applied manner all of the technologies used by teachers of languages. The emphasis will be on learning about the technologies, creating with the technologies, and making informed decisions using them. The class will also discuss how the technologies relate to current language pedagogies, both for individualized and classroom learning.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter144701Frank ScriccoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • FLA 570: Intro Media Language Teaching

    Graduate 3 credits

    Course open to non-D.A. students. Gives students an introduction to all of the technology used in teaching languages; audio, video, computer, and Internet. Emphasis is on hands-on use and practical applications. Fall or spring Prerequisites: FLA 505 and FLA 506

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter144801Frank ScriccoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • FRN 311: Conversation

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: HFA+; LANG; SPK

    A course emphasizing the development of oral and aural proficiency in French. Class work, supplements, use of technologically-based materials.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter131630TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter131630Sophie SirulnickOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-06:30PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • GEO 102: The Earth

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: E SBC: SNW

    A summary of the processes that have shaped the earth and the other terrestrial planets as inferred from study of their surface materials, structural features, and interiors. Topics include the earth in the solar system; earth materials and rock-forming processes; surface processes and their bearing on human activities; crustal deformation and global tectonics; the earth's interior; and the geological features, compositions, and evolution of the terrestrial planets. Not for credit in addition to GEO 122.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter108430Christiane StidhamOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • GLI 391: HFA Topics in Globalization

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: GLO; HFA+

    Topics in the Humanities and Fine Arts that are connected with Global Issues such as: Global Cities and Urbanization Processes; Global Diasporas and Ethnicities; Global Development and Sustainability; Cultural and Political Representation in a Global Context; Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context; Global Corporations, Institutions, and Policies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter138930Urbanism After Covid Phillip BaldwinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • GLI 392: SBS Topics in Globalization

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: GLO; SBS+

    Topics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences that are connected with Global Issues such as: Global Cities and Urbanization Processes; Global Diasporas and Ethnicities; Global Development and Sustainability; Cultural and Political Representation in a Global Context; Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context; Global Corporations, Institutions, and Policies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter139030Global Human Rights TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter139030Global Human Rights Juliette PasserOnline Sync/Async CombinedTuesday05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HAL 375: Supplement Use Sport Perform

    Undergraduate 2 credits

    Course introduces the use of supplements in sport from a sports medicine and athletic training perspective. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using dietary supplements. Presents scientific research on recommended dosage and potential side effects. Both competitive and recreational athletes' needs and concerns are addressed. Upon completion of course, students should be able to evaluate and make recommendations about dietary supplements. Open to west campus students. G/P/NC grading option is not available. Prerequisite: Completion of Any Undergraduate Biology Course or Equivalent

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter123701Barbara Jean ErcolinoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Open
  • HAL 376: Introduction to Nutrition

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Introduces students to fundamentals of nutritional science and food systems. Reviews dietary sources and functions of macro and micronutrients and the basic of their metabolism and impact on energy balance and common health problems. Explores types of food systems, including production, transformation, distribution, access and consumption and Explores the impact on the environment and human health. Discusses contemporary issues and controversies such as eating disorders, diet trends and sports nutrition. Open to west campus students. G/P/NC grading option is not available.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter123801Kristen MitchellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAHSC Campus (Health Science Center)Closed
  • HEA 523: Student Affairs Administration

    Graduate 3 credits

    An overview of the history of the Student Affairs field, as well as a more in-depth examination of the changing context in which student affairs professionals practice. This will include the philosophies, ethics, and theories that guide the practice of student affairs work. Review of the development of the field, legal and ethical foundations of practice, learning, retention and development theories, changing campus environment (including diversity, economic considerations and access issues), organizational structure, strategic planning and finance, information technology, learning outcomes and assessment and human resources as they relate to student affairs. Consideration of the practical application of such topics in specific student affairs units i.e., housing/residence life, student activities, career services, counseling, Student health centers and judicial affairs. Formerly CEK 523.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1285S30Tara McNealyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HEA 524: Enrollment Management

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course covers marketing the university, programs to attract applicants, the application process, generating and applying models for predicting enrollment, and assessing outcomes, including ratios such as applicant-to-accept, accept-to-enrollment, and enrollment-to-retention, and graduation rates. Issues of selectivity, financial aid leveraging (merit and need-based scholarships and aid programs), and linkages between academic and student affairs are covered. The prime focus is undergraduate enrollment, but the course also examines graduate and professional school enrollment. Learn roles of admissions officers and counselors, information technology and data processing professionals, and institutional research analysts. Ways to attract and retain students, increase selectivity and enrollment, and improve students' academic and social integration and success are highlighted. Formerly CEK 524.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1213S30Meaghan ArenaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HEA 525: The Contemporary Undergraduate

    Graduate 3 credits

    An in-depth examination of lifestyle, attitudes, characteristics and demographics of the contemporary undergraduate college student in the United States. This course offers an overview of the theoretical and research literature on college students in the U.S. from a variety of perspectives, and considers the educational, social, and environmental needs of different student subgroups. Students will explore traditional and non-traditional college populations at two-and four-year institutions. Formerly CEK 525.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1286S30Robert MangioneOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • HEA 530: Legal Issues in Higher Educ

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course, designed for college and university administrators, presents an overview of key issues and problem areas in the fast developing law of higher education. Topics include student and faculty rights and responsibilities, academic freedom, governance, affirmative action, campus security, collective bargaining and labor relations, to name just a few. Students will review important court cases that establish a framework for decision-making and will also participate in problem-solving exercises. Former title: Higher Education Law Formerly CEK 530.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1287S30Thomas McDonaldOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HEA 531: Finance Issues in Higher Educ

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course is devoted to the examination of critical concepts in higher education finance by analyzing key theories, structures and challenges of college and university financing. Funding sources, the role of federal and state governments, allocation of resources, balancing budgets and contingency plans will be discussed along with ethical considerations of major public policy issues in financing higher education such as affordability, access/choice, equity, productivity and accountability and the public private benefits of higher education. Formerly CEK 531.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1216S30Joyce WellingerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HEA 540: Critical Issues in Higher Ed

    Graduate 3 credits

    In this advanced seminar students address critical questions pertaining to US higher education. The topics selected represent themes that continue to elude resolution, but nonetheless generate thoughtful and often heated discussion, argument and debate. A list of subjects to be covered includes, but is not limited to: Affirmative Action, the Rising Cost of College Tuition, Collective Bargaining & Tenure, Distance Education, MOOC's, Collegiate Sports, Non-Traditional Students, and Campus Safety. This is a special topics course. Students may repeat the course 2 times for a maximum of 6 credits. Formerly CEK 540.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1212S30First-Year Student Success Stephanie FooteOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HIS 215: Long Island History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K&4 SBC: SBS; USA

    An exploration of U.S. history through the lens of Long Island's history from colonial times to the present. Topics include the island's Native Americans, colonial settlement, towns and counties, the Revolution, slavery, whaling, farming, the Long Island Railroad, suburbanization and modern cultural, social, and economic developments.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter145730Bonnie SoperOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HIS 216: History of US-Latin Am Relatns

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; SBS

    An examination of the impact of U.S. economic and political relations with Latin America from the mid-19th century to the present. The course considers changes in American policy toward Latin America, as well as the varying responses of Latin American nations to U.S. intervention and influence. This course is offered as both HIS 216 and POL 216.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter130430Kenneth WohlOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HIS 287: Crime & Criminal Justice U.S.

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F&4 SBC: SBS; USA

    Study of the development of police, courts, prisons, criminal law and crime in the United States from the 17th century to the present. How were the institutions of criminal justice created? How did they change? How have people perceived and responded to crime? Previously offered as HIS 373. Not for credit in addition to HIS 373.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter145830Zinnia Capo-ValdiviaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HIS 302: Environmental History

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An exploration of human-caused transformations in natural environments and in ideas about nature from prehistory to the present. Examining topics from agriculture and deforestation in classical antiquity to the Columbian encounter, from problems of environmental management in imperial India to the emergence of environmentalism as a global movement today, the course focuses on case studies from several regions, including the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, New England, and South Asia.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter148231Fernando AmadorOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HIS 393: Topics in Modern European Hist

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: I SBC: SBS+

    Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to modern European history. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter146030Rebellions, Mutinies&mandates TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter146831Soviet Russia Dafina NedelchevaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HRM 538: Organizational Devel & Change

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course will acquaint students with types of organizational change and the roles of human resources managers as change agents and internal consultants. Cases, group exercises, and class discussions are used to examine change methods, employees' reactions to change, facilitation techniques, and evaluation methods. Roles of leaders, managers, employees, and human resources professionals are considered. Targets of change include job designs, interpersonal relationships, downsizing/rightsizing and organizational structures. Quality improvement, employee involvement, and professional development are studied as examples of change strategies. Students learn how to help their co-workers cope, as well as how to become trusted business advisors within the organization. This course is offered as both HRM 538 and MBA 538 (formerly CEX 538). Prerequisite: MBA 532/HRM 532.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1337S30Robert MiceraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HRM 541: Human Relations/Workforce Plan

    Graduate 3 credits

    Organizations, both today and in the future, look for employees, managers, and leaders who possess a significant understanding of the principles and practices of human relations and organizational behavior in the workplace. Given the value of human capital in our ever-changing global economy, the strategic impact that human resource leaders have on their organizations has never been more important. This course explores the modalities of human relations in the workplace, explains and applies employment laws that govern human relations and workforce planning, and applies innovative workplace solutions and programs to aid leaders so they can retain and engage a productive and high functioning workforce. (Formerly CES 511)

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1217S30Catherine FarrellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HRM 547: Performance Management in Org

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course provides insight to the importance of performance management and the behavior of individuals and teams in organizations. Emphasis will be placed on implications for effective human resource management, and the need to align organizational goals with performance management practices. Approaches used to drive performance and analyze problems encountered in managing human resources will be discussed throughout the course. Additional topics include performance appraisal, individual and group decision-making skills, recruitment, selection, and employee orientation, employee ability, motivation and incentive systems, job satisfaction, retention, and employee engagement.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1214S30Edward DelgaizoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HRM 548: Diversity/Global Issues @ Work

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course examines contemporary practices and trends in the global marketplace. Topics include both the similarities and differences among people, organizations, and management across sectoral and national boundaries that must be a part of the knowledge base of tomorrow's human resource manager. Human resources from a global perspective, including issues for expatriates and repatriation, the European Union, health and safety, business ethics, employee benefits and unions will be covered. Additional emphasis will be placed on understanding how differences among multinational corporations, governmental regulatory agencies, public authorities, strategic alliances, political and cultural environments impact the management of human resources.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1215S30Douglas SilvermanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter1347S31Douglas SilvermanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter1488S32Michael CarrOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HUI 234: Intro to 20th-Century Drama

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: GLO; HUM

    A study of avant-garde drama through the analysis of texts by Marinetti, Bontempelli, Pirandello, Betti, Beckett, Ionesco, and Tenessee Williams. Important questions such as identity and diversity are discussed from a variety of perspectives within the social, psychological, sexual, and multicultural context of our time.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter144901TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter144901Michele GiuaOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.03:00-04:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • HUS 254: Latin America Today

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: DIV; GLO; HUM

    An introduction to a global perspective on contemporary Latin American culture. Latin America's political, historical, and cultural developments of this century are studied.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter111430Regulo SilvaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ISE 301: History of Computing

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    A study of the history of computational devices from the early ages through the end of the 20th century. Topics include needs for computation in ancient times, development of computational models and devices through the 1800's and early 1900's, World War II and the development of the first modern computer, and early uses in business. Creation of programming languages and the microchip. Societal changes in computer usage due to the microcomputer, emergence of the Internet, the World Wide Web, and mobile computing. Legal and social impacts of modern computing. Cannot be used as a technical elective for the CSE major or minor. This course is offered as both CSE 301 and ISE 301.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter134530Richard McKennaOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ITL 111: Elementary Italian I

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    An introduction to spoken and written Italian, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Selected texts are read. Practice in language laboratory supplements class work. ITL 111 is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Italian in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take ITL 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit in addition to ITL 101.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter145001Antonio FideleoOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • ITL 112: Elementary Italian II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An introduction to spoken and written Italian, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Selected texts are read. Practice in language laboratory supplements class work. May not be taken for credit in addition to ITL 101.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter145101Michele GiuaOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • JRN 305: Mass Communication Law &Ethics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Provides students with a model by which they can analyze, understand, and act upon the law and ethical considerations that journalists and mass media professionals and consumers face in the 21st century. The class will use case studies, the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, the First Amendment Handbook from the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press, and current newsworthy stories to build an analytical model. This course is offered as both JRN 305 and COM 305

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter145630Richard RicioppoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • JRN 390: Special Topics in Journalism

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    This special topics course will deal with timely and contemporary issues that affect journalists and journalism. The issues could range from the press in wartime to how the press covers presidential campaigns. May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter145530Improv For Journalists Louisa JohnsonOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • LIN 101: Human Language

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS; SNW

    An introduction to the fundamental areas and concepts of modern linguistics. Sounds and their structure, word structure, and sentence structure are discussed. Other topics may include historical linguistics (how languages change over time), dialects, writing systems, language and the brain, and psycholinguistics (especially the question of how children acquire a language).

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter142630TBAOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.05:30-08:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • LIN 200: Language in the United States

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS; USA

    Survey of the languages and language-related issues in the United States. Topics include Native American languages; immigrant languages; dialectal variations (e.g., Black English); the domains in which these languages were and are used; maintenance and loss of minority languages; language contact and its effects; the use of Spanish; language attitudes and politics is including bilingual education; and official language movements. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of American English from colonial times to its present world-wide status; the use and impact of Spanish; language attitudes and politics including bilingual education; and official language movements.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129330TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • LIN 330: Language Acquisition

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ESI; SBS+; STEM+

    Introduction to the field of language acquisition. Issues include cognitive processes, role of innate ability and environment, developmental stages, individual variation, universal tendencies, interaction of language and cognition, bilingualism, similarities and differences between first- and second-language acquisition, and language disorders.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter109630Lisa TafuroOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • LIN 532: Second Language Acquisition

    Graduate 3 credits

    Study of the acquisition of a second language by children and adults. The focus is on data; the systematicity of the learner' errors, the ease of acquisition in childhood, etc., the adequacy of theories (e.g. Interlanguage processes, the monitor model, the critical period) to explain data, and the reliability of methods of obtaining data. Students conduct an empirical study testing a current hypothesis. Prerequisite: Enrollment in TESOL or LIN program or permission of instructor, and, LIN 530, or LIN 521 and 523

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter137830Lisa TafuroOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • LSF 501: Effective Prof. Communication

    Graduate 3 credits

    DEC: AHLS

    Concepts and practice in different modes of professional communication: writing in a variety of genres; designing effective, accessible presentations; speaking, and effective group problem solving and writing/communicating strategies, as well as using selected technologies to support these skills.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1423S30Jennifer YoungOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MAT 123: Precalculus

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: C SBC: QPS

    Comprehensive preparation for the regular calculus sequences. Careful development of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, and their applications. Asymptotics and curve sketching. General modeling examples. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter105030Debra WertzOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter100431Debra WertzOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MBA 504: Financial Accounting

    Graduate 3 credits

    Introduction and exploration of basic financial accounting terminology, principles, concepts, and their relevant business applications. This course will include the recording, summarization, and adjustment of financial transactions and the preparation and presentation of the basic financial statements. Other topics will include valuation methods for cash, accounts receivable, inventory and property, plant and equipment. This course is also offered as EMP 502.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter141430Rocco SabinoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MBA 506: Leaders, Teams, Communicator

    Graduate 3 credits

    The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the multifaceted phenomenon of leadership, teams, and communications. It seeks to answer the following three questions: What do leaders really do? What makes teams effective? How do you create persuasive communications? The course addresses such topics as leadership styles, building motivated teams, and developing strategic communications. It examines these topics with a goal of not only imparting knowledge about evidence-based managerial practices but also assisting students to acquire the skills necessary to become business leaders, team builders and articulate communicators.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter119030James CarrOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • MBA 507: Ethics in Management

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course examines the main ethical problems facing the modern manager. Emphasis is placed on the moral and ethical responsibilities that relate to investors, employees, customers, and the community. Students will learn the basic vocabulary of business ethics.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter117930Lori PackOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • MBA 512: Business Planning

    Graduate 3 credits

    The principles and techniques of strategic management by which an organization sets and implements its long-range direction. This includes the processes of environment scanning, self-assessment of organizational purpose and comparative advantage, and synthesis of organizational mission, plans, and strategic initiatives. Extensive use is made of case studies and in-class exercises. Spring, every year,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter117830Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter119231Aristotle LekacosOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MBA 544: Supply Chain Management & Anal

    Graduate 3 credits

    Businesses engage in a diverse set of activities in their daily operations including production planning, resource procurement, inventory management, distribution, and interaction with other firms. The goal of supply chain management is to maximize the economic value of these activities through system level coordination. A successful supply chain streamlines the flow of materials, goods, information, and capital along each component of the supply chain.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter141530Mohammad Delasay SorkhabOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MBA 592: Organizational Behavior

    Graduate 3 credits

    An approach to understanding the behavior of individuals in organizations is developed, with emphasis on implications for effective management. This approach is used to analyze decision problems encountered in managing human resources. Topics include individual and group decision-making skills, recruitment and selection, employee ability, motivation and incentive systems, job satisfaction, performance assessment and management, retention, training, and employee development. Fall, every year,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter118430Michael NugentOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MEC 105: Everyday Science & Eng.

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: E SBC: SNW; TECH

    A practical introduction to the science and engineering of objects and phenomena in everyday life. The basic principles that underlie the operation common to modern devices such as xerographic copiers, tape recorders, computers, microwaves, lasers, CDs, plastics, nuclear weapons, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are developed by investigating how they work. The scientific method, engineering design methodology, safety, and environmental impacts are discussed in the context of these practical applications.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter131330Jay MendelsonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MEC 203: Eng Graphics and CAD

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    Introduces engineering graphics and its role in design process. Includes the principles of engineering drawing and sketching for mechanical design, the use of computer graphics and solid modeling in design representation of 3D objects, assembly and simulation as well as ASME standards on geometric dimensioning and tolerances. Includes hands-on experience in the use of CAD software packages for engineering design. Engineering ethics.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115430Jiawei TianOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MEC 280: Pollution and Human Health

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    An examination of major environmental pollution problems such electromagnetic radiation, ozone layer depletion, and global warming, with a specific focus on the resulting effects on human health. Assessment of health risks in relation to the formulation of environmental and workplace regulations is also considered.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter115530Jay MendelsonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MKT 567: Integrated Marketing Managemen

    Graduate 3 credits

    Marketing managers must be able to determine which customers their organization should serve, which products and services it should offer them, and how. This course is intended to develop an analytical framework for these decisions that permits managers to maximize their organization's return on marketing expenditures. Emphasis will be placed on developing a position in the marketplace that provides value to customers that is not readily duplicated by competitors. As a result, the first half of the course will develop models for understanding customers, competitors, and collaborators (e.g., suppliers and intermediaries). The second half of the course will examine tools available to marketers to execute strategic decisions.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter132630Stacey FinkelsteinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MUS 101: Intro/Western Classical Music

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to music of the Western classical tradition. This course covers basic concepts and vocabulary such as melody, harmony, rhythm, counterpoint, and form, as well as particular pieces of Western classical music. Various compositions and genres are considered in relation to the cultural and ideological values they embody, and the historical contexts in which they emerge. No previous musical training is assumed. Not for credit after MUS 130.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104130Deborah HeckertOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MUS 109: Rock, Popular Music, & Society

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    A study of rock and related popular musical traditions in the United States. The music is investigated through consideration of its: 1) musical constituents (rhythm, form, pitch structure, instrumental texture, and vocal style), 2) historical development, beginning with its roots in earlier folk and popular styles through to the present, and 3) social meanings, uses, and ramifications.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104230TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • MUS 308: History of Jazz

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: HFA+; USA

    Historical study of the origins, evolution, and influence of jazz, a musical art form originating in and evolving with the experiences of black Americans. Examination of styles, figures, and places connected to jazz, from Louis Armstrong in New Orleans to Billie Holiday in New York to Kendrick Lamar in Los Angeles. Consideration of central issues including improvisation, commercialization, race, and gender. Not for music major credit.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter128030TBAOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PHI 104: Moral Reasoning

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: B SBC: CER; HUM

    An introduction to philosophy through inquiry into the formation, justification, and evaluation of moral judgments. Students are introduced to the major theories and problems of ethics, such as utilitarianism, Kant's categorical imperative, ethical relativism, egoism, and classical conceptions of the good and virtue. Against this background students engage in discussions of contemporary moral issues.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129830Anna MoentmannOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PHI 108: Logical and Critical Reasoning

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: B SBC: ESI; HUM

    The principal aim of this course is to help a student acquire the skills of thinking, reading, and writing critically. The student develops a sensitivity to language and argumentation that is applicable to a wide range of situations and subject matters. Material is intended for freshmen and sophomores.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter105330Giada MangiameliOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter108531Doga OnerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter134232Mohsen SaberOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PHI 112: Technology and Modern Life

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: H SBC: STAS

    Investigates the history as well as the present and potential future impact of technology and artifacts not only on material human life but also on the human experience of the world. It addresses ethical questions concerning the uses and abuses of technology as well as asking such questions as whether technology is neutral and merely instrumental or should be seen as having a more profound impact on human life.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129730Matthew ClemonsOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PHI 336: Philosophy of Religion

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: CER; HFA+

    A philosophical analysis of basic concepts, principles, and problems of religious thought. Topics may include faith and knowledge, religion and morality, divine attributes, arguments for and against the existence of God, and the problem of evil.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter140830Jennifer CarterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PHI 370: Philosophical Psychology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+; SBS+

    An examination of philosophical issues and some psychological theories concerning the nature of the person and the sources of the self. The course includes such topics as the dimensions of the person, the nature of conscious life, the scope of human cognition, and gender identity.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter143330Jennifer CarterOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 101: World Politics

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: GLO; SBS

    Analysis of the basic concepts and issues of international relations in the contemporary international system. The behaviors of states and their decision makers are considered according to various models of national and international conflict. The relationship between the characteristics of nations and their foreign policies is studied on a comparative basis.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter103230Pei-Hsun HsiehOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 102: Intro to American Government

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F&4 SBC: SBS; USA

    What the informed citizen and specialist should know about the organization of American government, including the Constitution and what it means today, the Congress, political parties, pressure groups, growth of the Presidency, the Supreme Court, judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and the Bill of Rights. May not be taken for credit in addition to POL 105.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter107530Jason RoseOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 216: History of US-Latin Am Relatns

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; SBS

    An examination of the impact of U.S. economic and political relations with Latin America from the mid-19th century to the present. The course considers changes in American policy toward Latin America, as well as the varying responses of Latin American nations to U.S. intervention and influence. This course is offered as both HIS 216 and POL 216.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter130530Kenneth WohlOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 318: Voters and Elections

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    An examination of how citizens make electoral decisions, including the decision to participate at all in elections. The course compares models of voter behavior and probes the influence of such factors as party identification, opinions on issues, ideological orientations, and candidate evaluations. In addition, the social and economic context of voting is explored, as is the importance of elections for policy making and the functioning of the political system.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter138830Joshua ShumateOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 322: Presidency in American Pol Sys

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    How presidential power developed historically; from what sources the powers of the modern Presidency emanate; how decisions are made in the presidential institution; how and to what degree presidential power may or ought to be controlled.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter127730Samuel JensOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 332: Politics of Criminal Due Proc

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    A survey of the procedural steps through which a criminal case passes commencing with the initial investigation of a crime, covering the laws and court rules governing arrest, search and seizure, bail and fair trial, and concluding with the unconditional release of an offender.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter106030Regina GoodOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 365: Economy and Democracy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    An examination of the interplay between economics and politics in Western democracies. Topics include the economic theory of democracy; the political-business cycle; political parties and economic policies; the economy and voter choices in elections; economic performance and government (especially presidential) popularity; and the formation of economic expectations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter139230Daniella AlvaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 516: Storms & Seas: Coastal Land Ma

    Graduate 3 credits

    Many areas of the world, like Long Island, are surrounded by water and are vulnerable to increasing weather -related threats and sea-level rise. This course dives into the challenges related to public policy design and implementation as climate changes force planners to consider novel solutions to increasingly complex situations.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter139330Richard MurdoccoOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • POL 537: Admin Law for Policy Analysts

    Graduate 3 credits

    This course examines the role of administrative law in the formulation, implementation and evaluation of public policy. The role of legislation such as the Administrative Procedures Act is explored. Actual cases are analyzed, as well as the broader set of precedents that have emerged in federal, state, and local administrative law proceedings.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter111630TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter111630Juliette PasserOnline Sync/Async CombinedWednesday07:00-09:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PSY 103: Introduction to Psychology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: CER; SBS

    An introduction to research and theory in psychology in such areas as learning, perception, cognition, biopsychology, development, personality, and abnormal and social psychology. As part of the course, students must participate in experiments and/or a library research project.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter130830Riley McDanalOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter130931Mengxing WangOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • PSY 230: Survey in Abnormal & Clin Psy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+

    Examines the description, etiology, course, and treatment of psychological disorders. Current theory and research are emphasized.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter108230Daneele ThorpeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • PSY 240: Survey in Social Psychology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: DIV; SBS+

    A presentation of various topics in social psychology including interpersonal processes, obedience to authority, social perception, attitude change, attraction and liking, and aggression and violence, especially as applied to national and international issues.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter142930Chelsie BurchettOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PSY 250: Survey in Biopsychology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS+; STEM+

    Introduction to the neural basis of sensory processes, motor control, attention, emotion, and learning.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter135130Kehinde ColeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • PSY 341: Psychology of Prejudice

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    An overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice. Topics include the development of prejudice among children; the role of cognitive, social, personality, and motivational factors in maintaining prejudice and stigma; the psychological consequences of prejudice and stigma; and strategies for reducing prejudice, stigma, and intergroup conflict.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter131130Caitlin MonahanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • PSY 346: Health Psychology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    The role of psychological factors in the maintenance of good health or in coping with illness. Topics include the modification of specific health behavior, such as alcoholism, obesity, lack of exercise, and smoking; the relationship of stress and illness; and coping with terminal illnesses.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter108330Daisy ZavalaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • PSY 349: Topics in Social Psychology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    May be repeated as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter106230Psychology Of Gender & Health Elizabeth InmanOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • PSY 382: Rsrch Lab: Social Psychology

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    SBC: ESI; WRTD

    Techniques and experimental problems in social psychology, including natural observation, surveys, and experimental design. Three hours of lecture and two hours of field or laboratory research per week. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1430L30Marybeth ApricenoOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • RLS 260: Buddhism

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introduction to the basic philosophy and doctrines of Buddhism, beginning with a survey of lives and works of major historical figures of Buddhism. The principal issues of Buddhist thought, drawing from Indian, East Asian, and Western sources, are treated. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of faith, practice, and enlightenment in Buddhism. This course is offered as both AAS 260 and RLS 260.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter143830Mary DiazOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • RLS 280: Islam

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: J SBC: GLO; HUM

    An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter143930Mohsen SaberOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • RUS 331: Contemporary Russian Literacy

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: HFA+

    The study of Russian Language and culture past the intermediate level through the use of internet resources. Intended to develop contemporary cultural literacy through online research, readings in online media and texts, writing essays and blogs in Russian. Note: this course is offered online and is intended for students of Russian-speaking background.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter148701TBAOnline Sync/Async CombinedFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter148701Anna GeisherikOnline Sync/Async CombinedTues. & Thurs.04:00-06:00PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • SBSNC 9: SBNC Arts Activities

    SBNC 0 credit

    Southampton Arts Non-credit Activities

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1329S30Fellows Emma Walton HamiltonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBASouthampton Campus (Southampton Campus)Open
    Winter1328S60Bookends Susan MerrellOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAManhattan (Manhattan)Open
  • SOC 105: Introduction to Sociology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: SBS

    A general introduction to the science of sociology, emphasizing sociological theory and methods. Students are taught what is unique about the way in which sociologists analyze human behavior and society. Differences between the sociological perspective and perspectives of other social sciences are emphasized. There is also a heavy emphasis on the types of methods and data that sociologists use to test the validity of their ideas.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter139930Tamas Robert CserniOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • SOC 200: Medicine and Society

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: SBS

    An examination of some traditional concerns of the humanities and social sciences as they occur in basic health care and its delivery. Practicing physicians or other health care professionals present clinical cases to emphasize such topics as allocation of scarce resources, issues of dying and refusing treatment, confidentiality, and cultural factors and disease. Discussion focuses on the social, historical, ethical, and humanistic import of the cases. This course is offered as both HMC 200 and SOC 200.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter107330Natalia NavasOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • SOC 201: Research Methods in Sociology

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: ESI

    Methods of collecting and analyzing empirical data to test sociological hypotheses. Emphasis is on multivariate analysis of tabular and statistical data.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter140030Sienna ThorgusenOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • SOC 247: Sociology of Gender

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS

    The historical and contemporary roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women's liberation and related movements. Themes are situated within the context of historical developments in the U.S. This course is offered as both SOC 247 and WST 247.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104530Sophia BoutilierOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • SOC 302: American Society

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS+

    Intended for students who wish to look at American society through the eyes of the sociologist. Included in the course is the sociological view of American social structure in terms of power and patterns of inequality, the legal system, ethnic and cultural pluralism, social mobility, and urban problems. Sociological issues are considered within the context of the developments of society throughout U.S. history.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter140130Katie GordonOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • SOC 310: Racism and Ethnic Relations

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS+

    The comparative experience of ethnic and other minority groups within the United States, including formation, migration, and conflict; prejudice, discrimination, and minority self-hatred. Consideration of the developments of U.S. society from the colonial period to the present provide the context for consideration of the changing experiences of ethnic groups.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter140330Michael LenmarkOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • SPN 112: Elementary Spanish II

    Undergraduate 4 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: LANG

    An introduction to spoken and written Spanish, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Language laboratory supplements class work. All entering students should take a placement exam to evaluate their proficiency. Please see https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter140930Michael McMahonOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter141031Mario HenaoOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • SPN 311: Spanish Conversatn & Compositn

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: S3 SBC: DIV; HFA+; LANG

    A thorough review of Spanish grammar and of the active use of spoken and written forms. May not be taken for credit in addition to SPN 310.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter141130Maria Medin DoceOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-12:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • SPN 582: Hispanic Tradition in the US

    Graduate 3 credits

    A general historical analysis of the influence of Hispanic culture in the United States as a consequence of the continuous interaction between Spanish- and English-speaking people. Special attention is given to cultural manifestation in a bicultural setting. Fall or Spring,

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1434S30Zaida CornielOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • SPN 592: Spanish Language AcquisitionII

    Graduate 4 credits

    Elementary Spanish II intended for graduate students from other programs.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter141330Michael McMahonOnline SynchronousTues., Weds., Thurs., Fri.09:30-01:55PMWest (Main Campus)Open
  • THR 103: Introduction to Theatre Design

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: D SBC: ARTS

    An introduction to design and technology for theatrical performances. Through the lens of design and technology, this course highlights the collaborative nature between this field with performance and dramatic text. The course will examine genres, innovations, cultural context, and the creative process as it applies to design and technology and its integral relationship with all areas of production. It also takes a cross-disciplinary approach while examining a full array of theatrical forms and creation, from Broadway to the most current trends in theatre making. This course is an essential foundational step for students interested in the field of theatre arts or live performances.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter143130Phillip BaldwinOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WRT 101: Introductory Writing Workshop

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: A1

    An introduction to the foundations of writing, offering students a variety of rhetorical strategies and helping them develop creative and critical thinking, fluency, and correctness. Coursework creates ample opportunities for significant practice in reading, writing, and critical analysis. Emphasis on writing as a revision-based process. WRT 101 prepares students for WRT 102 and postsecondary academic writing. Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in WAE 194 or Writing Placement score of 3.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104630Lynne BarskyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter130332Steven DubeOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WRT 102: Intermediate Writing Workshop

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: A2 SBC: WRT

    A study of strategies for extended academic writing assignments including critical analysis, argument or point of view, and multi-source, college-level research essays. Students continue to develop rhetorical awareness, analytical proficiency, and academic research skills. At the end of the course students create a multimodal ePortfolio of final revised essays to be evaluated by their instructor and at least one outside reader. Prerequisite: WRT 101; 3 or higher on AP English Language/Composition exam or AP English Literature/Composition exam; 580 or higher on the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing SAT or 1050 or higher on the combined Critical Reading and Writing SAT (last administered Jan 2016); 23 or higher on the English Language Arts ACT or 24 or higher on the combined English and Writing ACT (last administered June 2015); Writing Placement score of 4; C or higher in an approved transfer course equivalent to WRT 101.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter100530Ryan CalveyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter101231Andrea PaldyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter109832Ryan CalveyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter103633Jennifer YoungOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter101334Joseph LabriolaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter109735Joseph LabriolaOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter102136Margaret KennedyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter102937Lisa AngiusOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter134338Jennifer AlbaneseOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter134639Cathleen RowleyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter135340Margaret KennedyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter148441Jennifer YoungOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter149242Lisa AngiusOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • WRT 302: Critical Writing Seminar

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: HFA+

    A writing seminar, with rotating historical, political, social, literary, and artistic topics suggested by the professors each semester. Frequent substantial writing projects are central to every version of the course. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

    Session Class # Section Topic Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter102030Fiction Writing Sarah AzzaraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter133931Creative Nonfiction Jennifer AlbaneseOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • WRT 303: The Personal Essay

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    We all have stories to tell about our lives. In this course, we will explore how to tell them through the personal essay, a notoriously slippery and flexible form that we will engage by writing our own personal essays, as well as by reading and responding to writers who work in that genre. Students will also prepare a personal statement for their application to graduate or professional school, or for another academic or professional opportunity.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter105230Cathleen RowleyOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter108731Sarah AzzaraOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
  • WST 102: Intro Women's Stds in Soc Sci

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: F SBC: CER; DIV; SBS

    An introductory social sciences survey examining the continuities and changes women have made in marriage systems, child-rearing practices, and work patterns inside and outside the home. Within this context, the course considers how women have balanced labor force participation and changing child-care responsibilities in a variety of countries. Using the experimental design and case study methods of anthropology, sociology, economics, psychology, and history, and employing texts drawn from these disciplines, the course shows the changes women's lives have undergone over the past 150 years.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter108630Hafza GirdapOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
    Winter134431Francesca PetronioOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WST 103: Women, Culture, and Difference

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: CER; DIV; HUM

    An introductory humanities survey focusing on women's traditional association with the home and men's association with public life and how writers, artists, philosophers, and religious thinkers have reflected upon those relationships over the past 150 years. Through lectures and critical analyses of novels, poetry, art, philosophy, and religious texts, the course explores how changing intellectual, artistic, and religious precepts have affected gender identity and different genres in the humanities.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter102730Tasmia HaqueOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Closed
    Winter149431Valerie MoyerOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WST 247: Sociology of Gender

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS

    The historical and contemporary roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women's liberation and related movements. Themes are situated within the context of historical developments in the U.S. This course is offered as both SOC 247 and WST 247.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter104730Sophia BoutilierOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WST 282: Contemp. Carib Women's Lit

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    SBC: DIV; GLO; HUM

    Examines the political, social, and historical experiences of women from anglophone francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean nations. The readings, movies, and projects selected for the course highlight reccurent themes in Caribbean literature such as exile, migration, identity, colorism, slavery, sexual oppression, transnational motherhood, and identity politics. Feminist criticism, Postcolonialsm, and critical race theory will be applied to our reading of the texts. This course is offered as both AFS 282 and WST 282.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter146730Tracey WaltersOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WST 291: Introduction Feminist Theory

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: G SBC: DIV; ESI; HFA+

    An introductory survey of historical and contemporary interdisciplinary theories used in Women's and Gender Studies. Theoretical debates on sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, knowledge, discourse, representation are among the topics to be considered. The course will provide a strong theoretical foundation for further studies in Women's and Gender Studies.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter129530Melis UmutOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
  • WST 301: Histories of Feminism

    Undergraduate 3 credits

    DEC: K SBC: DIV; SBS+

    An historical study of the theoretical and practical developments that form contemporary feminism. Beginning with the 18th century critiques of women's rights, the course traces the expansion of feminist concerns to include a global perspective, as well as attention to race and class. Representative texts include Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, poems by Phyllis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas, and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.

    Session Class # Section Instructor Mode Days Time Campus Status
    Winter1296S30Jose Flores SanchezOnline AsynchronousFlexible (Online)TBAWest (Main Campus)Open
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