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MFA in Creative Writing & Literature

Courses: Fall 2017

Graduate Courses in Southampton | Graduate Courses in Manhattan | Undergraduate Courses at Stony Brook


GRADUATE COURSES IN SOUTHAMPTON

CWL 510.S02 Forms of Fiction: Short Story, Amy Hempel
Tuesdays, 5:20-8:10 (Class #86182A traditional workshop in which participants will read and discuss each other's stories, two per term, with special attention to a range of narrative strategies.  I will bring in stories that brilliantly illustrate key elements, and we will begin with brief written responses to two or three prompts intended to lead to story.  We will try in each instance to speak to a reader's fundamental question:  Why are you telling me this?  No text is required, as I will provide what we read. 

CWL 520.S01 Forms of Poetry: Poetry, Cornelius Eady
Thursdays, 5:20-8:10 (Class #86184Poets write, Poets read. These two statements will be the emphasis of this advance poetry workshop. You will be doing three things here: 1) writing and revising your own work (including exercises), 2) Doing close reading of the books assigned (including a reading list which will be generated by the workshop) 3) Interviewing visiting poets about craft, either via SKYPE or in person. The final in this workshop will be a chapbook of 10-20 of your best poems written and revised over the semester, due the last day of class. A secondary possibility with your chapbook might explore the various ways poetry can be performed.

CWL 535.S01 Writing in Multiple Genres: The Story You Are, Roger Rosenblatt 
Tuesdays, 2:20-5:10 (Class #96473) Every good writer finds a story or theme that defines his/her work, then returns to again and again. Believe it or not, you can find Portrait of the Artist in Finnegan, if you're willing to devote a year or two to the hunt. In a way, the pursuit of that one story is the pursuit of a life. And no matter how many times or complicated ways you digress from your story, you always return to it because that story also shows your particular strength as a writer. And by writing it, you are playing to your strength.
     This course attempts to help you discover and recognize the story you are - to establish it, to refine it, and to make that story clear to you, so that when you write it again and again you know what you're doing, as you  become expert in yourself. You'll write a number of pieces and exercises in different genres. You'll do reading relevant to the subject. Mainly, you'll search and forage for the artist you'll be for the rest of your lives. Warning label: You may not find it, yet.

CWL 540.S01 Forms of Creative Nonfiction: Memoir, Lou Ann Walker
Thursdays, 2:20-5:10 (Class #86751) In this workshop on the memoir, we will be figuring out how you can make your autobiographical stories as powerful as they can be, through discussing each other's work and looking at the masters of the genre.
 
CWL 565.S01 Special Topics in Writing: Find Your Voice, Megan McAndrew
Mondays, 2:20-5:10(Class #96655) This seminar, which is aimed at students working on a novel, memoir or short story collection, will explore the ways in which authors create distinctive voices. What makes a narrator compelling? How does the choice of first, second or third person affect tone? Why does point of view matter? Past or present tense? By analyzing selections from Amy Bloom, Porochista Khakpour, James Hamilton-Paterson, Anthony Marran, Yelena Akhtiorskaya and others, and through critiques of students' work, we will address the fundamental challenge that faces all writers: The development of a narrative voice that will keep readers turning the page. 
 
CWL 580.S01 Practicum in Arts Admin, Christian McLean 
Days and Times TBA (Class #)
This course teaches important skills in arts/event management. It provides knowledge in marketing, design and software that will boost your resume and increase your workplace skill set. We’ll examine work/volunteer opportunities in local arts organizations and you will design an MFA event from the ground up. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

CWL 581.S01 Practicum in Teaching Writing, Julie Sheehan
Thursdays, 10:30-1:20P (Class #89356) CH 202 and on MAIN CAMPUS
This course, offered in combination with undergraduate sections of CWL 202, Intro to Creative Writing, provides hands-on experience and instruction in the basics of writing pedagogy, including designing writing assignments, sequencing assignments, evaluating writing, and developing syllabi for four different courses. Students will also be given a preliminary overview of the major theories driving composition pedagogy. Travel to main campus is a part of this course. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

CWL 582.S01 Practicum in Publishing & Editing, Lou Ann Walker
Wednesdays 12:30-3:20 (Class #) CH 202
Under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students will be exposed to the hands-on process of editing and publishing The Southampton Review. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.


CWL 599.V12 Thesis Preparation, Julie Sheehan
Wednesdays, 5:20-6:10 pm, available via Skype (Class #96641) This section is for students who will begin working on thesis during this term, but who have not yet completed the process of arranging their advisement. At first, we will meet weekly, then we will phase out class time as students move into work with their advisors. Thesis students who already have advisors will register in that advisor's section of thesis.

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GRADUATE COURSES IN MANHATTAN

Stony Brook Manhattan
535 Eighth Avenue (between 36th and 37th Streets), 5th Floor
 
CWL 500.S60 Introduction to Graduate Writing, Robert Reeves & Carla Caglioti,
Mondays, 5:20-8:10 (Class #86183) A seminar that introduces students to one another, the faculty, the program in Creative Writing and Literature, and to issues in contemporary writing. Offered in conjunction with the “Writers Speak” lecture series. Students will attend the regular series of readings sponsored by the Writing program and meet at weekly intervals under the direction of a faculty advisor to discuss and write about topics raised in the lecture series, as well as issues generated from seminar discussions and assigned readings. Please note:  CWL 500 is a required course that should be taken in the first year. 
 
CWL 520.S60 Forms of Poetry: A Collage of Sites: Writing on Location in NYC, Star Black  
8 Saturdays(Class #88688) 11 am - 5 pm on 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 11/4. New York City has long been a global center for the visual arts, and for artists and writers. This course takes students out and about to museums (the Brooklyn Museum, The Whitney Museum, The Museum of Modern Art and others) as well as to locations (Chelsea, Tribeca, Williamsburg, Harlem) to document art and street art with their cell phone camera and to write "ekphrastic" pieces–creative writing in the form of poems, prose poems and flash fiction inspired by street scenes and works of art. A final paper will be an illustrated sequence of each student's writing during the course. Weekly homework in the form of writing assignments will also be assigned. Students meet at SBM to share their writing at 11 am, followed by lunch at 1:20 pm and on-location writing until 5 pm. Please note: students should bring student I.D.s and be prepared, at some museums, to pay discounted student admission fees.

CWL 530.S60 Forms of Scriptwriting: Writing for TV, Scott Burkhardt.
Wednesdays 5:20-8:10 (Class #96402). Writing the Spec Script. Students learn how to write a spec script for a TV show that is currently on the air. A “spec” is a script where the writer creates original stories for a show’s existing characters.  A great spec is a key part of the portfolio needed to get a job as a television writer. Students will learn how to brainstorm story ideas, structure an outline and write scenes with dialogue, all in a constructive, supportive workshop atmosphere. The class covers both half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas. In addition, the class will watch, deconstruct and discuss a wide variety of TV shows in order to better understand how a successful episode is built. All the basics of TV writing are covered and the workshop is designed to closely mirror a professional writers room on a prime-time series.
 

CWL 565.S60 Special Topics in Writing: Reading and Writing the YA Novel, Ibi Zoboi
Wednesdays, 5:20-8:10(Class #87586) This course will introduce the history of Young Adult literature and examine how setting and voice have always shaped the genre and its evolution from books that delve deep into the lives of American adolescents to a movement that defines multiple generations of readers. Topics will cover how class, gender, race, and nationality affect both voice and setting, be it rural, suburban, urban, or a futuristic world. Some larger questions will include the role of issue-based YA novels that are a direct response to social justice themes. Selected YA titles will be within multiple sub-genres such as contemporary, fantasy, and science fiction. Students will also work on their own writing. 
 
CWL 570.S60 Advanced Writing Workshop: The Long Arc, Susan Merrell
Tuesdays, 5:20-8:10 (Class #86752). This class will look at your book-in-progress from beginning to end. A group of writers, each of whom is already embarked on a longer work, will come together as a team of crack investigators to examine structure, arc and character, with an eye to creating whole and cohesive literary works.  Full first draft preferred but open to anyone with 100 pages and a view of the entire scope of the work.
 
FLM 550.S60 Teaching Practicum: Karen Offitzer
TK 5:15-7:45PM (Class #) . This is a weekly seminar in teaching at the University level, with special emphasis on teaching in the creative arts, specifically creative writing and filmmaking. This course plunges into the basics of pedagogy, exploring learning styles, discovering a teaching philosophy, designing syllabi for undergraduate courses, creating assignments and rubrics for grading assignments, and practicing these skills in a classroom setting. You’ll get hands-on experience and mentoring through visits to undergraduate classes, teaching opportunities, and lots of readings and discussions about issues that arise when teaching in the creative arts.

Based on availability (after FLM students enroll):

FLM 510.S60 (96718), Film History I: European Auteurs Film Survey, (3cr)
Tuesdays 8:20-11:10 PM, Lenny Crooks There is an identifiable European way of filmmaking. It has nothing to do with style or genre (although Action films are few and far between). Rather it is about process and priority. Regarding process, there are so many sources of public funding for development that for most distributed films have the writer will have been paid for several drafts. As regards priorities, the director is considered the most important element in a film's creation. So much so that many films are financed on artistic merit without undue consideration of the box office potential of lead cast members. Regardless of who has written the script, a director who has achieved distinction is considered the author or 'Auteur'. At two-week intervals we will screen and discuss a film followed by an analysis of the director's body of work.
 
FLM 650.S60 (#_____) Find Your Story, Write Your Script (3cr.)
Tuesdays 5:20-8:10 PM, Annette Handley Chandler This course will offer intensive study of the screenwriting craft with a focus on character development, structure, scene construction, scene sequence/juxtaposition, dialogue and theme. Viewing films, film clips as well as analyzing and deconstructing more complex screenplays will be required. Rigorous class sessions will consist of group readings and open critiques. The objective of this course will be to create a three-act outline and to write or rewrite a full-length feature screenplay. All levels.

With Permission of instructor; especially available to CWL students who took Advanced Party Spring 2017:

FLM 651.S61 (#96710), Screenwriting Workshop II: Dogme (3cr)
Mondays, 5:20-8:10 PM, Lenny Crooks With the guidance of Lenny Crooks, Magdalene Brandeis, and Jennie Allen, writer/directors will follow in the tradition of the Stony Brook/Killer 20/20/20 boot camp and borrow from the Dogme manifesto drawn up by Danish filmmakers Lars Von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg. This course offers a unique writing/directing/learning opportunity. Working from pre-existing characters -- either a main character or a subsidiary character from a short film you have written or made - and inclusive of your classmates' characters, the group collaborates to create a digital series, filmed in December. Episodes add up to a cohesive series. This course will give participants writers’ room experience, show-runner experience, and prepare feature film directors for trans-media promotions, etc. Course Prerequisite: first year production. 

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSES - ALL HELD ON WEST CAMPUS

 

CWL190 Introduction to Contemporary Literature
            S01 Tues/Thur, 2:30-3:50P (Class #94608), FREY 112 Christian McLean 
Topic:
Seminar surveying recent works in a genre or topic, to introduce students to poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction or a combination of selections focusing on a particular theme. Participants will develop skills of interpretation and analysis through reading and writing about contemporary literature.  Required for the minor.
Prerequisite: WRT 102
DEC:     B
SBC:     HUM
3 credits
 

CWL 202 Introduction to Creative Writing:

S01 Mon/Wed, 8:30-9:50A (Class #94585), SOCBEH N110 Matthew Lehman

S02 Mon/Wed 8:30-9:50A (Class #94586), SOCBEH N115 Jackie Henry. Topic:Truth, Lies & Perception: A Sensory Experience. In this age of “alternative facts,” “fake news,” and polarized viewpoints, it can be hard to determine exactly what Truth is—even in our own lives. Perception develops through the senses, as well as through our histories and environments and how we react and interact with the world. In this beginning creative writing course, we’ll open the doors to our senses—questioning what we see, hear, taste, smell and feel—and mine our lives for both truths and fictions as we create a portfolio of short creative works that will include poetry, stories, essays and drama.  

S03 Mon/Wed/Fri, 10:00-10:53A (Class #94587), SOCBEH N110 Lauren Harvey. Topic: Writing is the basis of all communication. When we write creatively, self-expression becomes an art. This class is about writing—so expect to write every class. Every single class. Practicing on a regular basis helps us become comfortable with the craft. It also helps us learn what we have to say. We will be studying works by great writers and examining how we can apply their successful techniques to our own work. We will copy them, satirize them, and try to break out from their mold to make our own writing. This will help us find our own voices. We will study three literary genres: poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. The last section of class will split focus between published work and peer work through workshop and discussion. Keep in mind: this class is about experimenting and, sometimes, failing. It is about learning all the many ways we can express ourselves. And, most importantly, which method best fits you.

S04 Mon/Wed/Fri, 11:00-11:53A (Class #94588), HUMNE 3008 Lauren Harvey. Topic: Writing is the basis of all communication. When we write creatively, self-expression becomes an art. This class is about writing—so expect to write every class. Every single class. Practicing on a regular basis helps us become comfortable with the craft. It also helps us learn what we have to say. We will be studying works by great writers and examining how we can apply their successful techniques to our own work. We will copy them, satirize them, and try to break out from their mold to make our own writing. This will help us find our own voices. We will study three literary genres: poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. The last section of class will split focus between published work and peer work through workshop and discussion. Keep in mind: this class is about experimenting and, sometimes, failing. It is about learning all the many ways we can express ourselves. And, most importantly, which method best fits you.

S05 Mon/Fri 1-2:20P (Class #94589), SOCBEH N115 Caitlin Mullen. Topic: Writing (and Rewriting) Everything. Welcome to Intro to Creative Writing! This course is designed to teach you the fundamental craft elements that are used in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry and help you create original pieces in each of these genres. No prior experience in any one of these genres is more important than a willingness to read, take risks, talk about writing and, of course, do plenty of writing of your own. There will be an emphasis on revision throughout the semester, so you will also be editing and rewriting your work with the goal of developing stronger, more interesting, more polished poetry and prose.

S06 Tues/Thur, 8:30-9:50A (Class #94590), HUMANE 3019 Natalie De Paz

S07 Tues/Thur, 8:30-9:50A (Class #94591), HUMANE 2047 Lily Wann. Topic: So You Want To Be a Writer? Do you often find yourself dreaming of writing carefree verse in the treetops? Or perhaps, hunched over an old typewriter writing voices into the night. Certainly you’ve daydreamed about seeing your words come to life on a stage. Well, look no further. In this course we will be constructing poetry, fiction, and plays from the ground up. Everything you have ever dreamed about will be at your disposal as we read like writers, talk like writers, and perhaps becoming writers ourselves along the way. Let’s learn the basics so we can write on with reckless abandon!

S08 Tues/Thur 10-11:20A (Class #94592), HUMANE 1082 Anthony DiPietro

S09 Tues/Thur 5:30-6:50P (Class #94593), SOCBEH N108 Kristina Pacione. Topic: Fiction, Poetry, Workshops—oh my! If you’re nervous about having to share your work with a room of strangers, then this is the course for you. This course will not only teach tools for enhancing creative writing, but also for delivering and receiving valuable workshop feedback. You will learn how to objectively speak about creative material and balance conflicting critiques. You will develop and strengthen your own writing and revision process, as well as identify your “voice” through various in‐class writing prompts. Instructor and students are obligated to help create a safe, respectful, and accepting environment for peers to feel comfortable to share and talk about their creative work cooperatively. 

S10 Tues/Thur, 2:30-3:50P (Class #94594), SOCBEH N115 Joanna Anderson

S11 Tues/Thur, 4:00-5:20P (Class #94595), SOCBEH  N106 Dorothy Hom. Topic: “To Celebrate the I.” A creative writing workshop where writers can express themselves through emotions, opinions and points of view without feeling self-conscious about who they are or where they come from. Writers can differ, rant or rave, sound bombastic, shy, lovesick or pained, all to convey to any reader what it is like to be their shoes. Words can be used as a megaphone, but can one not also whisper, convincingly, who he or she really is? From fiction to poetry to personal essay and memoir, students will be encouraged to unleash their ids. Through examining the elements of craft and class feedback, each writer will discover how best to articulate his or her voice.

S12 T/Th, 2:30-3:50P (Class #94596), SOCBEH N103 Zinnia Smith

Creative writing workshop in multiple genres, from fiction to poetry to scriptwriting, intended to introduce students to the basic tools and terminology of the fine art of creative writing. Participants also read contemporary works, give a public reading, and attend a reading series. This course, offered on both Southampton and main campus, is required for the minor in creative writing.Prerequisite: None
DEC:     D
SBC:     ARTS
3 credits

 

CWL 300 Forms of Creative Nonfiction
S01 Wednesdays, 4:00-6:50P (Class #94597), SOCBEHAV SCI N108 William Ste. Marie
S02 Tuesdays, 4:00-6:50P (Class #94598), HUM 3014 Cornelia Channing
Topic: Nature Writing. This course is designed for writers interested in understanding and participating in the reflective and explorative tradition of nature writing. Together we will consider fundamental artistic and ethical questions, such as: Is writing about the environment and its destruction of a higher artistic order than writing about urban life? Is nature sacred? Using The Norton Book of Nature Writing, we will spend time looking into the roots of nature writing before inserting ourselves into the conversation with our own work. Students will focus on building an individual essay informed by the outdoors, with the goal of creating a deeply layered, original piece worthy of publication. To guide our writing, we will be reading nature writing, mostly from the 20th century from the quiet observations of Henry David Thorough, to the political poetics of Wendell Berry to the personal ecologies of Peter Matthiessen and Carl Safina. We will explore the avian world from many angles, incorporating essay, memoir, journalism and research with our own observation. BUT THAT’S NOT ALL! We won’t just be writing–we will also be learning to see what is around us in new ways. We’ll spend as much time as we can outdoors watching, feeling, listening, experiencing the natural world. Along the way we’ll also read work by nature writers, meet and talk to some local nature writers and natural scientists, and explore some of the aesthetic, ethical and philosophical issues that are inherent in writing about the natural world.
Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through creative nonfiction, with examples from the tradition and exploration of the nature of fact, memory, subjectivity and perspective. Areas of study include Personal Essay, Memoir, Blogs and Alternate Forms, the Journal, Historical Inquiry and Social Commentary. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: CWL 202
DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits
 
CWL 305 Forms of Fiction
S01 Tues/Thur, 5:30-6:50 (Class #94599), SOCBEH N106 Sophia Rubenstein
Topic: Trying On Voices (Fiction Edition). In this course, students will closely read unique authors of fiction with the goal of deconstructing the elements of writing that lend to that author’s unique voice. As a class, we will discuss diction, voice, tone, imagery, pacing, and storytelling among other elements of each author’s craft. After coming to a collective understanding of how each author is accomplishing his or her work, students will be challenged to write their own original short-stories that mirror the writing style of the selected author. We will be studying Roxanne Gay, George Saunders, Raymond Carver, Jennifer Egan, David Foster Wallace and Lauren Groff. This course will include two workshop rotations as well as a final class project in the form of a student-made anthology.
 
S02 Thursdays, 4:00-6:50P (Class #94600), FREY 222 Amy Hempel 
Topic: Short Story. We will read and discuss contemporary stories and short-short stories by writers from the U.S., primarily, but also from Nigeria, Israel, the Philippines, and elsewhere, with attention to the basic elements of narrative, such as voice, point of view, characterization, and story itself.  You will write very short responses to several prompts, and one story plus revision to discuss in class.  The required book is Making Shapely Fiction, by Jerome Stern. I will also provide a course-pack of stories to read and discuss.
 
S03 Mondays, 4:00-6:50 (Class #94601), SOCBEH N108 Caroline DeLuca
Topic: The Magic, Tragic & Comic in the Lyric Novel. How do we make sense of the deepest sorrows, injustices and the greatest absurdities that the world throws at us? Our everyday language and our everyday logic is often not up to the task. And so we use metaphors, we imagine fantastical factors at play, we paint our impressions of waking nightmares and dreams without trying to edit them to fit conventionally sensible narrative boxes. In this course, we will read and discuss lyric novelists who delve into this endeavor and use imagery, humor, and magical language or plot to grapple with the surreality of the deepest pockets of life. You will also respond to creative prompts, and have two opportunities to workshop a full short story or excerpt from a longer project.
Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through fiction, with examples from the tradition that illustrate point of view, character development, dialogue, plot, setting, theme, motif, and other elements. Areas of study include Short Story, Novella, The Popular Novel, Graphic Novels and Writing Funny.
Prerequisite: CWL 202
DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits
 
CWL 310 Forms of Poetry
S01 Mondays, 4:00-6:50 (Class #94602), SOCBEH N104 Natalie De Paz
S02 Tues/Thurs, 2:30-3:50 (Class #94603), HUMANE 1082 Anthony DiPietro
Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through poetry, with examples from the tradition of such tools as metaphor and image, sound, line, form, and juxtaposition. Areas of study include Powers of Poetry, Bright Containers: Form & Meter, and Methods & Madness, a study of the philosophical vs. visionary strains in poetry. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: CWL 202
DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credit
CWL 315 Forms of Scriptwriting
S01 Wednesdays 4:00-6:50P (Class #94604), SOCBEH N104 Helen Schreiner
Topic: Screenwriting. In this class you’ll learn an intimate approach to screenwriting that is focused on character as opposed to plot. Formulaic guidelines are left at the door with an agreement that an interesting character will always be a pleasure to watch in any situation. All aspects of character will be explored, including physiology, sociology, and psychology, as described by Lajos Egri in “The Art of Dramatic Writing.” Special attention will be paid to the environment your characters inhabit and how to translate the evidence of their six senses to the audio-visual medium that is film.
You will practice to become an astute observer of the characters in your own life. Your writing will be in an effort to capture those characters and their experiences and translate those to screen in the form of two short screenplays.  Through the viewing of films, reading of screenplays, and lots of practice (!), you will learn the technical mechanics of screenwriting, and the all-importance of character as the driver of story.

S02 Tuesdays, 4:00-6:50P (Class #96147) SOCBEH N113 Cornelius Eady
Topic: Playwriting. This is a workshop that will examine poetry and theater. The first half we will study the verse play, some of which will be live interviews with poet-playwrights; the second half will be a writing lab. By the last day of workshop, the student is expected:
  • To write a play, one-act or longer, (min. 15-20 pages) that incorporates poetry in some fashion.
  • To explore the techniques, theories and styles of ‘verse plays”
  • To add to one’s understanding of the writing and performance process

S03 Mon/Weds, 2:30-3:50P (Class #96148) SOCBEH N105 Adam Armstrong
Topic: Screenwriting. SO…you want to write a film? Then let’s get to it! In this course, students will be introduced to feature film screenwriting.  By studying screenplays and screening films, students will explore basic theory and format aspects of story structure, character development, use of conflict, scene writing, and dialogue. We will then apply these basic cinematic principles to the development of your own original screenplay. So much of screenwriting is done before you even type the first word of the script, so this class will focus specifically on the process of screenwriting: from the initial premise, through character exploration to treatments and outlines, and then finally writing the first half of your screenplay. By understanding the structure and dramatic elements of visual storytelling in cinema, student will learn to think critically about the rules of narrative within the film medium, and, most importantly, how to tell a story, and how to tell it well.

Study of the genre through readings, screenings, discussion and regular submission of original writing for film or theater. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through these collaborative media. Areas of study include Fundamentals of Dramatic Action, Visual Storytelling, Message Movies, Writing the One Act, and Extreme Events. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: CWL 202
DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits

CWL 330 Topics in European Literature for Writers—Megan McAndrew
S01 Tues/Thurs 2:30-3:50P (Class #94606) HUMANE 3017
A lecture for writers concentrating on one area of European literature, to be announced in the course schedule. The course may examine a historical trend in Western literature from multiple viewpoints, the rise of a specific genre, a social issue expressed in literature, or an issue in literary theory, as, for example, The Russian Novel; Classic Plots; Ibsen, Shaw and the Introduction of Feminism to Great Britain; Political Comedy on the Modern European Stage; and Reading Nature. The emphasis will be on scholarly analysis, but with engagement of student writers. Students may repeat this course as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course
Advisory Prerequisite: CWL 190
DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO, HFA+
3 credits 

CWL 335 Topics in American Literature for Writers
S01 Tues/Thurs, 11:30A-12:50P (Class #94607), HUM 3017 Amy Handelsman
Topic: Games as Narrative: Poker, Chess, Go & Others. The canon of contemporary literature is rife with references to games:  board games (chess, go,) card games (poker, bridge, whist, hearts) dominoes, backgammon, Mah Jongg, etc. Games figure prominently in novels, short stories, poems, plays, films, articles and books. They make an appearance contextually (characters playing games) and structurally (novels in the form of games). Poets ruminate on games as metaphor. Games in plays and movies are centerpieces for dramatic conflict. And non-fiction writers limn the contours of games not only with guides to best practices and play, but also with insight into cultural, historical, sociological phenomena.This course will focus on literature touching on a handful of games, especially poker, go and chess.
A seminar for writers concentrating on one area of American literature, to be announced in the course schedule. The course may examine a contemporary or historical trend in American literature, the rise of a specific genre, a social issue expressed in literature, an issue in literary theory, or any other exploration of American pluralism as, for example, Ethics and the Crime Novel; Varieties of American Humor; Southern Renaissance; and Contemporary Poetry Wars. The emphasis will be on scholarly analysis, but with engagement of student writers. Students may repeat this course as the topic changes.
Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course
Advisory Prerequisite: CWL 190
DEC:     K
SBC:     HFA+, USA
3 credits

 

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