Undergraduate Bulletin

Fall 2018 – Spring 2019

SUS: Sustainability Studies

SUS 202: Introduction to Environmental Humanities

An interdisciplinary inquiry into ethics, arts, culture, and theory in relation to environmental humanities. The course will be an overview of the emerging field of environmental humanities and will draw from multiple disciplines (philosophy, history, cultural studies, and literary criticism) to better our relationship to the nonhuman world. This course is a reading and writing intensive seminar and will require extensive writing practice, journaling, fieldwork, and formal essays. While you will be presented with established ideas and trends in environmental humanities, students will also be encouraged to formulate their own approaches to the material. The instructor values projects which exhibit critical and creative thinking along with a thorough understanding of rhetorical skills. This course is offered as both EHM 202 and SUS 202.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

DEC:     G
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

SUS 302: Integrative Assessment Models

Use, evaluation, and development of integrated assessment models. These model typically integrate environmental concerns with variables from other disciplines for the purpose of providing policy advice to decision-makers. Students will learn about the most frequently used integrated assessment models and what we can learn from them. The models studies will include the World3 model, which was the basis of the famous book "The Limits to Growth."

Prerequisite: SBC 201; U3/U4 status

3 credits

SUS 303: Demographic Change and Sustainability

This course will assess the unprecedented demographic changes and diversity of the 21st century, through an interdisciplinary approach. It will explore themes such as population ageing and decline, migration in population replacement, demographic change and sustainable public health, social welfare programs, environmental degradation, and differential vulnerabilities (e.g., gender, poverty, age, education, ethnicity and race, empowerment and rights).

Prerequisite: SBC 115

3 credits

SUS 306: Business and Sustainability

This course examines the interface between business and sustainability. It considers opportunities for the development and growth of profit and not-for-profit businesses associated with the promotion of sustainability. It also covers how environmental concerns and related governmental regulations influence business operations and profitability. Students will apply career skills and concepts from environmental economics to understand how business functions (e.g., operations, public relations, sales, health and safety, and corporate social responsibility) are influenced by environmental concerns. The course will highlight current issues and cases, provide an overview of theory and practice, and generate research to test students' hypotheses, and generally explore opportunities and threats to business viability. Review of current affairs, case analyses, role plays, field trips, and guest speakers will be included along with required reading in seminal theory and research.

Prerequisite: SBC 206

3 credits

SUS 307: Environmental Economics and Management

This course presents advanced concepts in environmental economics and management through a series of detailed case studies. The cases include those concerning the US sulfur-dioxide permit trading system, the Kyoto Protocol, zoning, coastal fisheries, the use of ethanol in gasoline, tradable development rights in the Long Island Pine Barrens and the conservation of endangered species.

Prerequisite: SBC 206

SBC:     STAS

3 credits

SUS 308: Economic Development

This course teaches students about economic development and its relationship to the environment. Students learn about both the theory of economic growth and the way development has proceeded in various regions of the world. Examples will come from the Asian tiger economies of East Asia and the development disasters in Sub-Saharan Africa. The relationships between the levels and rates of growth of output and various environmental indices will be explored.

Prerequisite: SBC 206

3 credits

SUS 324: Geography and the Global Environment

A study of the historical, geographical, and humanistic foundation for understanding the environment and the environmental issues that confront us today. The fundamental principle of this course is that environmental dynamics are inseparable from social, cultural, political, and economic processes and relations. By studying these complex relationships between humans and the natural environment over time and through space, students examine how human activity impacts the environment in different geographical regions and periods and how the environment responds.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

3 credits

SUS 341: Environmental Treaties and Protocols

A multi-disciplinary study of the scientific basis, objective, development, implementation, and intended and unintended consequences of a single major Environmental Treatise or Protocol, such as the Kyoto Protocol. Official documents, secondary literature, as well as commentary on the Treatise or Protocol are studied.

Prerequisite: SBC 111, or ENS 101, or GEO 101; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

SUS 342: Energy and Mineral Resources

This class will explore the origin, distribution, and importance of energy and mineral resources to modern civilization, with an emphasis on fossil fuels and non-renewable mineral resources extracted from Earth. Geological processes responsible for the formation and distribution of energy and mineral resources, as well as current and future supply and demand are discussed. The environmental implications of the extraction and use of energy and mineral resources as well as techniques to minimize the impact on the environment will be discussed.

Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

SUS 343: Age of the Anthropocene

Provides a deeper understanding of the ways in which humans have interacted with and transformed the planet during recent geologic time, including the Holocene, Industrial Revolution, and into the present. We consider Earth as a global ecosystem, characterized by interacting and dynamic systems, including natural and anthropogenic. This course critically examines the current interpretations and applications of the term Anthropocene, and identifies the key tenants and societal outcomes of this powerful, and sometimes conflicting, idea as applied today in science, sustainability, and beyond.

Prerequisite: one of the following courses: SBC 111, SBC 113, ENS 101, GEO 101, GEO 102, ENV 115, CHE 131

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

SUS 350: Contemporary Topics in Sustainability

This course deals with the meaning and the application of the idea of sustainability. First, the mathematics of exponential and linear growth, and the concept of stability in complex systems will be developed. The idea of stable equilibrium and the long-term/short term distinction will also be discussed. Then, various subjects of sustainability--populations, species, habitats, ecosystems, resources, cultures, modes of production, economic systems, and political systems will be considered. Various purposes of sustainability for its own sake, for human welfare, for the welfare of nature will also be discussed. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: SBC 111; U3/U4 status

3 credits

SUS 366: Philosophy of the Environment (III)

Philosophical questions raised by human relations with the natural world, ranging from basic concepts such as nature, ecology, the earth, and wilderness, to the ethical, economic, political, and religious dimensions of current environmental problems, including the question of whether there are values inherent in nature itself beyond those determined by human interests alone. This course is offered as both PHI 366 and SUS 366.

Prerequisite: PHI 104 or two PHI courses; or permission of the department

DEC:     G
SBC:     CER, HFA+

3 credits

SUS 405: Environmental Sustainability in Tanzania

Focus on environmental issues in Tanzania as a sample of the developing world, with emphasis on present condition and future prospects. We examine how climate, technology development, and agriculture affect the environment. Also, impacts of environmental degradation and national policies (including the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals) on poverty reduction, natural resources, health and economic growth are discussed.

Prerequisite: one of the following: SBC 111, ENS 101, GEO 101

SBC:     EXP+, GLO

3 credits

SUS 444: Experiential Learning

This course is designed for students who engage in a substantial, structured experiential learning activity in conjunction with another class. Experiential learning occurs when knowledge acquired through formal learning and past experience are applied to a "real-world" setting or problem to create new knowledge through a process of reflection, critical analysis, feedback and synthesis. Beyond-the-classroom experiences that support experiential learning may include: service learning, mentored research, field work, or an internship.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent; permission of the instructor and approval of the EXP+ contract (http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/bulletin/current/policiesandregulations/degree_requirements/EXPplus.php)

SBC:     EXP+

0 credit, S/U grading

SUS 487: Research in Sustainability Studies

Qualified advanced undergraduates may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

1-6 credits, S/U grading

SUS 488: Internship in Sustainability Studies

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. May be repeated to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: U3/U4 status and permission of the Undergraduate Program Director

SBC:     EXP+

0-12 credits, S/U grading