Undergraduate Bulletin

Fall 2022 Bulletin

BUS: Business Management

BUS 115: Introduction to Business

The course provides a general framework for students to develop an understanding of how businesses work, how they are managed, and how different business models are applied to existing businesses in today's fast paced business environment. Introduces students to major business topics to form a foundation for understanding the general functional areas of business, the environment businesses operate in, and general principles of management and leadership. The course materials and coverage provides the fundamentals necessary for Business majors and minors understanding of more advanced business topics encountered in upper division Business courses while introducing students from other majors to the importance of business in the development of ideas into products and services and their distribution to customers through markets. As part of the course, students must participate in experiments and/or a library research project.

3 credits

BUS 215: Introduction to Business Statistics

The application of current statistical methods to problems in the modern business environment. Topics include probability, random variables, sampling techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression. Students analyze real data sets using standard statistical software, interpret the output, and write extensively about the results.

Prerequisite: BUS Major, CME Major, or ISE Major; and MAT 122 or higher.

3 credits

BUS 220: Introduction to Decision Sciences

Familiarizes students with a variety of quantitative methods applicable in managing both the service and manufacturing sectors. Basic concepts of quantitative modeling are applied and tested in various examples supporting decision making in business settings. Topics include: optimization via linear, integer, and goal programming; simulation; decision and break-even analysis; and forecasting. (Formerly Management Science)

Prerequisite: BUS Major, MTD, ECO, ISE, or CME major; BUS 215; MAT 122 or higher

SBC:     STEM+

3 credits

BUS 294: Principles of Management

An analysis and application of the basic principles of management. Subjects include management by objectives, supervisory leadership styles, current managerial problems, motivational techniques, organizational problems, communications, planning techniques and management control systems. We will closely examine case studies that focus on real world problems involving major corporations and closely look at the relationships that led to the issues.

Prerequisites: BUS Major, U1 or U2 standing or permission of instructor

3 credits

BUS 300: Writing for Business Management

In order to meet the upper-division writing requirement for the BUS major, the student must complete a portfolio of written work consisting of three documents: his/her resume; a letter of application for a real job advertised in a newspaper or other medium; and a two-page memorandum describing the results of an analysis or similar issue appropriate to a business organization.

Prerequisites: BUS major; U3 standing

0 credit, S/U grading

BUS 301: Business Communications

The purpose of BUS 301 - Business Communications is to provide Stony Brook College of Business undergraduates with a conceptual framework and specific tools for communicating in complex environments and accomplishing strategic academic and professional business goals. This core course provides writing, oral and collaborative skills necessary for future business courses, internships, and professional positions.

Prerequisite(s): BUS major or Communication and Innovation minor; WRT 102; and U2 standing or higher

SBC:     SPK, WRTD

3 credits

BUS 302: Social Media Marketing Strategy

Social Media Marketing Strategy covers theoretical and practical perspectives for developing and implementing social media marketing strategies. The course is designed to expose students to state-of-the-art practices in social media marketing with an emphasis on leveraging insights from social media to inform strategic firm decisions.

Prerequisites: WRT 102; BUS 348; U2 standing or above

3 credits

BUS 317: Estate & Financial Planning

The Retirement, Estate, and Financial Planning course is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in Insurance, financial planning and asset management. This course will also be highly beneficial for those wishing to learn how to manage their own financial affairs and how to make wise financial decisions.

Prerequisite: BUS major

3 credits

BUS 325: Legal Environment of Business

Explores competing interests of buyers and sellers, creditors and debtors, suppliers and consumers. Studies the Uniform Commercial Code from the initiation of a sales contract through financing of transactions, examines the rights of debtors and creditors in bankruptcy, and introduces basic concepts of law and regulation in the areas of securities, environmental protection, employment, and anti-trust.

Prerequisite: ACC Minor

SBC:     CER

3 credits

BUS 326: Organizational Behavior

As members of many types of organizations throughout our lives, we are all affected at some time or another by their internal dynamics. These dynamics consist of the behaviors of individuals and students as they work and interact together within the organization. To help us best understand and address these issues, the field of organizational behavior has developed as the study of the behavior of individuals and students in organizations.

Prerequisite: Business major and WRT 102

SBC:     DIV

3 credits

BUS 330: Principles of Finance

The goal of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and tools in finance. Upon completion of the course students should understand the role of a financial manager, be able to develop and analyze financial statements of a corporation, recognize the corporation's main sources and uses of funds, and develop understanding of the corporation's capital budgeting process.

Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECO 108

3 credits

BUS 331: International Finance

Course will focus on understanding how firms meet and manage their financial objectives in today's international financial environment. The topics include the management of foreign exchange exposure, foreign direct investment decisions, and multinational capital budgeting.

Prerequisites: Business major or AMS or ISE or MTD or ECO major and BUS 330.

3 credits

BUS 332: Entrepreneurial Finance

Before going public, companies like Facebook, LinkedIn and Zynga relied on venture capital financing to grow. Similar companies are increasingly choosing private market solutions. A focus on the development of secondary markets that provide an alternative to the traditional IPO. This course teaches the necessary tools for investors and entrepreneurs to build and evaluate these early-stage companies.

Prerequisites: Business Major and BUS 330

3 credits

BUS 333: Introduction to the Business of Real Estate

This foundation course is a multi-dimensional program whose main objective is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the real estate profession. The core subjects will include real estate development, legal issues, real estate finance and investment, appraisals, environmental issues, real estate economics and capital markets. Highly qualified guest speakers will be invited for presentations and discussions to provide the student with in-depth hands on knowledge and experience in all facets of the real estate profession.

Prerequisites: BUS Major

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 330

3 credits

BUS 334: Integrated Mktg Communications

Stages and processes involved in developing an integrated marketing communications campaign. A range of marketing activities, including a situation analysis of the company, competition, and business environment, communications audit of a brand and its competitors, budgetary considerations, creative strategy and media planning will be covered. Apply learning to a team project that will walk through various stages of developing an integrated marketing communications campaign.

Prerequisites: BUS major or PSY major with a marketing concentration; BUS 348 and U3 or U4 standing.

3 credits

BUS 336: Mergers & Acquisitions

Corporate mergers and acquisitions continue to play a significant role in many companies' value and growth strategies. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to mergers and acquisitions (M&A) from the perspective of corporate finance. The primary objective of the course is for each student to gain a well-rounded understanding of the major strategic, economic, financial, and governance issues of mergers and acquisitions.

Prerequisites: Business Major and BUS 330

3 credits

BUS 337: Entrepreneurship Compared Across Countries

Starting and managing a business is a risky albeit potentially rewarding undertaking. The complexity and challenges (as well as potential payoffs) facing entrepreneurs and business managers vary across different countries. The origins and development of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship has similarities and differences across countries. The development of value is common across countries. The way that value is developed differs historically in Great Britain, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East compared to development in the United States. Value is distinguished from financing and taxing.

Prerequisite: Business major

Advisory Prerequisite or Co-requisite: BUS 353

3 credits

BUS 340: Information Systems in Management

An introductory course in management information systems (MIS). Its objectives are to develop a basic understanding of the concepts and techniques needed in analyzing, designing, and managing these systems, and to explore the applications of computers and information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of individuals, groups, and organizations.

Prerequisite: BUS Major, ISE Major, or CME Major; U3 or U4 standing.

SBC:     TECH

3 credits

BUS 346: Operations Management

Analysis and design of service and manufacturing systems. Topics include quality management, product and service design, process selection and capacity planning, design of work systems, inventory management, aggregate planning, material requirements planning, scheduling, waiting line model, just-in-time systems, and supply chain management.

Prerequisites: BUS Major or ISE Major: BUS 215 or AMS 102 for non-business majors, and BUS 220.

3 credits

BUS 348: Principles of Marketing

Basic marketing concepts and their applications. Issues include strategy, market segmentation, individual consumer behavior, marketing research, promotion, pricing and international marketing. The emphasis is on analysis of the challenges facing business with respect to all relevant constituencies, including the company in general, managerial colleagues across functional areas, consumers, stockholders, and government. This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 349.

Prerequisite: BUS Major or ISE Major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration.

3 credits

BUS 351: Human Resource Management

Major trends in personnel management, including problems and issues faced by organizations and individuals in times of change. Responsibilities of the human resources department and the roles that every manager plays, both as a supervisor and as a client of the human resources department, are studied. Topics include human resources forecasting and planning job design, employee selection, test development and validation, equal employment opportunity laws and judicial rulings, performance appraisal, compensation, benefits, career development, safety, and labor relations.

Prerequisite: BUS Major or MTD Major

3 credits

BUS 353: Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship is the study of new venture creation and management and it could occur in a myriad of ways depending on the interactions of entrepreneurs and opportunities. This course provides an overview of issues of creating a business, ranging from opportunity recognition and evaluation to resource acquisitions and management. It is designed to appeal to individuals with strong desires to become entrepreneurs, to join start up companies, or to work in the venture capital industry. The course objectives are threefold: 1) to develop a scientific understanding of entrepreneurship, and the empirical evidence in support of theories; 2) to transform this scientific understanding to practice; and 3) to provide firsthand experience with dealing with uncertainty and managing the start-up process.

Prerequisite: Business majors, Engineering majors or Communication and Innovation minors: U4 Standing

Co-requisite for engineering majors: Enrollment in relevant senior design course

3 credits

BUS 354: Understanding Business Agreements

Provides students with an understanding of legal documents in business and the business transactions behind them. Students review many types of legal documents likely to be encountered in a business career. Includes: agreements between business partners (stockholders and partnership agreements); technology and employment related agreements (confidentiality, employment, and joint development agreements); and commercial transactions (sales, loan, and acquisition agreements).

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; BUS or CEAS major

3 credits

BUS 355: Investment Analysis

Investment Analysis helps students make informed investment decisions in their personal and professional lives by providing a solid foundation of practical applications to introduce the topics and techniques used by investors and money managers. Course topics include: the investment environment, securities markets and transactions, finding investment data and information, return and risk, modern portfolio concepts, common stocks, analyzing common stocks, stock valuation, market efficiency and behavioral finance, fixed-income securities, mutual funds and exchange-traded funds.

Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

3 credits

BUS 356: Financial Analysis with Excel

The course focuses on issues in finance and investing, computational techniques related to corporate finance and investment decisions will be the core of the course. Using excel this class will explore the financial mathematics of: foreign currency transactions, corporate valuation, capital budgeting, inventory valuation, profit margins, financial modeling, leveraged buyouts, and financial forecasting.

Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

3 credits

BUS 357: Principles of Sales

Presents the skills to be successful in an extremely competitive business sales environment. Includes customer qualification, prospecting, sales message, sales demonstration, handling objections, closing techniques, and telemarketing and customer service activities.

Prerequisites: Business major and BUS 348

3 credits

BUS 358: Marketing Research

Introduces marketing research tools that aid managers in marketing decision-making and how the marketing research process can be used to collect and analyze data and information to solve marketing problems. A strong applied orientation exposes students to marketing research in traditional areas such as market segmentation, product positioning, product design, brand perception, and sales forecasting, as well as emerging areas including customer satisfaction, customer relationship management (CRM), and on-line marketing.

Prerequisite: BUS major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration; U2 standing or higher; BUS 348; BUS 215 for BUS majors, one of the following for PSY majors: AMS 102, ECO 320, POL 201, PSY 201 or SOC 202.

SBC:     ESI

3 credits

BUS 359: Consumer Behavior

Examines the basic concepts underlying consumer behavior with the goal of understanding how these concepts can be applied in analyzing and solving marketing problems.

Prerequisites: BUS major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration; BUS 348; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 361: Retail Management

This course focuses on the necessary concepts and principles of retailing involved in making retail and wholesale decisions. The course looks at retailing from both a consumer perspective (e.g., why does a consumer shop a particular retail outlet?) and a business-to-business perspective (e.q., how does the retailer decide which supplier to use?) Additionally, the course examines the various methods of retailing (e.q./ bricks and mortar, bricks and clicks) and how these methods have evolved and will evolve in the future. The content of the course is useful for students interested in working in the retail industry, as well as for students interested in working for companies that interface with retailers such as manufacturers of consumer products or for students with a general management or entrepreneurial interest.

Prerequisite: BUS Major

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 362: Principles of International Marketing

Course incorporates functions of the marketing organization whose responsibility is to direct and lead the total international marketing enterprise. It addresses the 4 P's of marketing and other marketing principles and how they apply to global markets.

Prerequisite: BUS Major

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 363: Brand Management

This course teaches students fundamental and leading-edge concepts in brand management. It will address the strategic importance of branding, provide theories and strategies for building, leveraging, and defending strong brands, and discuss current opportunities and challenges facing brand managers. The student will learn how to manage key relationships and functions that surround the brand, e.g. , advertising, promotion, public relations, licensing, product and package design. A capable brand manager has exceptional strategic, quantitative, interpersonal, and presentation skills, and must be comfortable with decision-making and leadership. The course will focus on the development and application of these skills in brand management via in-class learning, case discussion, and project work.

Prerequisites: Business major and BUS 348

3 credits

BUS 365: Financial Management

Financial management techniques and analysis for improving business decision-making will be explored. Topics include: Long and short term financial decisions, debt and equity funding, capital structure, net working capital, inventory management, account receivable management, and how to deal with financial distress related to reorganization and/or liquidation in bankruptcy. The basics of payout policy will be discussed including dividends and stock repurchases. In addition, students will learn how companies finance merger and acquisition decisions, including leveraged buyouts.

Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

SBC:     ESI

3 credits

BUS 366: Money and Financial Institutions

The characteristics of money and financial institutions within the financial system. Organization and operations of the Federal Reserve System, U.S. Banks and the U.S. Treasury. Details on how these financial institutions impact on the financial system. Determination of interest rates. Study of the framework and the management of banking and non-bank financial intermediaries.

Prerequisite: BUS, AMS, MTD, ISE, or ECO major; BUS 330

3 credits

BUS 370: Lean Practices in Operations

Global competitive forces are driving the adoption of lean practices in service, retail, and production operations. Using examples from diverse industry leaders such as Wal Mart, Dell, McDonald's, and Toyota, this course examines the application of the Seven Deadly Wastes, Just-in-Time, Value Stream Mapping, and Supply Chain Alliances.

Prerequisite: BUS major

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 371: Supply Chain Management

Businesses engage in a diverse set of activities in their daily operations including production planning, resource procurement, inventory management, distribution, and interaction with other firms. The goal of supply chain management is to maximize the economic value of these activities through system level coordination. A successful supply chain streamlines the flow of materials, goods, information, and capital along each component of the supply chain.

Prerequisite: BUS major and pre/co-requisite BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 372: Quality Management

The philosophies, tools, and techniques to identify and meet internal and external customer needs. Emphasis on the importance of satisfying the customer's perception of quality as a strategic necessity in Operations Management. Topics include Total Quality Management (TQM), quality control, statistical process control, and Six Sigma.

Prerequisite: BUS major

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 375: Data Mining

Given today¿s massive size of data, data mining aims to address the data analytics problems by discovering useful patterns and information hidden in the data. Importantly, awareness of the importance of data mining for business is becoming wide spread. The industry has created an increasing number of job opportunities for people who have data analytic skills. The key objectives of the course are two-fold: (1) to teach the fundamental concepts of data mining and (2) to provide hands-on experience in applying the concepts to real-world applications. The core topics to be covered in this course include classification, clustering, association analysis and anomaly analysis. * Computer skills: Some applications of data mining models introduced in class will be demonstrated in R, so students can expect to learn basic programming skills in this class.

Prerequisite: BUS major

3 credits

BUS 376: Risk Management & Insurance

Risk Management and Insurance course will explore the principles of risk and insurance. The course will include an analysis of risk and strategies to eliminate, minimize, or transfer risk. Students will become familiar with key components and life, accident, and health insurance policies as well as property and casualty insurance.

Prerequisite: BUS major

3 credits

BUS 377: Risk Management & Insurance II

Risk Management and Insurance II will continue to explore the principles of risk and insurance. The course will include an analysis of risk and strategies to eliminate, minimize, or transfer risk. Students will become familiar with the key components of life, auto, accident and health insurance policies as well as property and casualty insurance. Annuity, 401K and other retirement plans will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BUS major

3 credits

BUS 378: Marketing Ethics, Public Policy, and Social Change

This course examines ethical and legal issues associated with marketing practices as well as how marketing can be used to exact change to improve societal health and well-being. These concepts will be examined primarily from the point of view of the behavioral sciences including psychological, sociological, economics, and cultural perspectives. Students will apply this basic knowledge to analyze ethical problems associated with marketing practices, analyze effectiveness of public policy based on scientific knowledge, and develop ideas for social change and social justice through marketing.

Prerequisite: BUS major

3 credits

BUS 380: Honors - Research Methods

Prepares students for business research and the honors research project. Practical business applications drawn from a variety of functional areas including strategic management, marketing, operations, finance, and human resource management. Industries include high technology, retail, banking, and manufacturing. Research methodologies include survey design, interviewing, observational methods, and experimental design. Research process includes problem finding, literature review, and proposal writing.

Prerequisites: Admission to the honors program in business management

SBC:     ESI

3 credits

BUS 383: Social Entrepreneurship

Students explore the concept of social entrepreneurship, including motivation and skills for advocacy, entrepreneurship, and leadership. Topics include forms of social entrepreneurship (private, public, and not-for-profit), venture capital and fund raising, market analysis, marketing, communications, human resources, and human relations, including negotiation and conflict resolution methods. Students will explore models of corporate social responsibility, university service to the community, and grass-roots ventures spawned by perceived need and the will to make a difference. Students work in teams to develop a strategic business plan for their own venture and present their proposals to the class.

Prerequisite: Business Major or Communication and Innovation minor

3 credits

BUS 389: Honors Research in Marketing

The student writes the Business Honors Program thesis under the supervision of a faculty member thesis advisor and the program director. The thesis advisor will direct and assist the student as he or she develops the thesis topic, formulates the research hypotheses, performs the basic research, writes the thesis, and presents the thesis research. The faculty member will also assist the student in acquiring necessary knowledge in the area of marketing as required to perform the thesis research. Students are required to present their thesis at the Undergraduate Research and Creativity (URECA) program in April.

Prerequisite: Business Honors Program membership and department consent required.

3 credits

BUS 390: Special Topics in Business Management

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: BUS major; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 391: Management of Sports Organizations

Introduction of fundamental issues pertinent to any business - planning organization, staffing, and controlling. It discusses areas the sports manager is likely to encounter while conducting business, such as federal legislation influencing the sport business, employment related issues, funding and budgeting, risk management, site selection and customer service.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 393: Principles of Project Management

Anything we do in both our personal and professional lives that delivers something unique within a finite time frame is a project. Applying project management tools and techniques improves the likelihood of success. Beyond schedules and budgets, project managers must demonstrate high emotional intelligence to lead teams, effectively solve problems, and understand the nuances of culture and contracts. In this "get-out-of-your-chair" classroom exercise laden course, students will experience project management concepts. Class discussions will focus on the "real world" application of these concepts. Students will also gain hands-on experience with Microsoft Project.

Prerequisites: BUS Major

Pre or Co-requisite: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 399: Intellectual Property Strategy

Concepts and techniques of strategic management are examined and applied to relevant cases involving the management of intellectual property as applied to a wide range of industries and innovations. The course will begin with a brief overview/review of some principals of management strategy. We will then survey the types of intellectual property, and some of the laws that support exclusivity in intellectual property rights. This will provide the foundation for more in-depth discussion of the relevant issues and examination of how companies and individual innovators utilize intellectual property to protect their innovations and profit from them. Course lecture and discussion will focus on the strategic uses of various forms of intellectual property, including patents, trade names, trade secrets, and copyrights. Students will explore the use and importance of intellectual property in building and sustaining a competitive advantage, as well as strategies used to realize the highest value from intellectual property.

Prerequisite: Business major or Communication and Innovation minor; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 401: Negotiation Workshop

Real-time "hands-on" experience in bargaining and negotiating. Students develop expertise in applying techniques for collaborative problem solving and resolving conflicts between parties. Topics include analysis of distributive (zero-sum) and integrative (win-win) bargaining situations, ethical and legal considerations, dealing with contentious and "tricky" negotiating tactics, psychological heuristics and biases, verbal and nonverbal communication, roles of agents in negotiation, mediation, inter- and intra-organizational negotiation, multi party negotiation, and cross-cultural negotiation. Students participate in in-class role-play situations involving negotiating with each other in a variety of realistic business and personal scenarios.

Prerequisites: Business Major; U4 Standing

3 credits

BUS 440: International Management

Increasing internationalization of markets is forcing firms to develop global strategies that protect profits and enhance value chains. Various aspects of international business including currency exchange, tariffs, BOP, economic parameters, regional labor practices and international channels of distribution will be discussed. Concepts of cross-border wealth creation and various theories of trade will be reviewed as well as international Product Life Cycle. Socio-cultural components will be discussed with emphasis on management choices. Other topics such as location, topography and climate will be reviewed.

Prerequisite: BUS Major or ECO or MTD Major; U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 441: Business Strategy

Capstone course that builds on tools and concepts introduced in more specialized business courses and on students' general business knowledge. Includes: methods for analysis of forces driving competition; identification of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats faced by individual corporations; and practical strategies for enabling new or existing firms to compete successfully within an industry. Case studies and in-class situations challenge students to develop skills in handling multidimensional business problems.

Prerequisite: BUS or ECO or MTD or CME Major; U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 446: Ethics: Critical Thinking through Film

This course combines critical thinking, discussion of moral values, and ethical considerations applied in a business setting. Using narrative film (i.e. a fictional scenario) to depict challenging ethical dilemmas, students will engage in critical thinking, evaluation of moral standards, and display of various ethical positions pertaining to contemporary society and business. A simulated situation as presented in a narrative film and supported by research from the humanities, will add to experiential learning, emphasized in contemporary business education.

Prerequisite(s): BUS Major; WRT 102 ; U4 standing

SBC:     CER

3 credits

BUS 447: Business Ethics

An introduction to traditional ethical theories and their application to business. A basis for understanding how ethical issues in business arise, and some strategies to control or resolve them, are derived from an examination of the work of philosophers and other writers relating to business ethics. Recent business case studies enable students to develop their own perspectives.

Prerequisites: BUS Major or ECO, ISE, or MTD Major; WRT 102; U4 standing.

SBC:     CER

3 credits

BUS 448: Marketing Strategy

A capstone course for students in the Marketing Specialization in which students apply a wide range of marketing principles to address problems different companies face in areas such as channel distribution, pricing, new product development, communication, promotions, strategic marketing alliances, positioning, and target marketing.

Prerequisite: BUS Major or PSY major admitted to the marketing concentration and U4 Standing; Pre or Co-requisite BUS 358.

3 credits

BUS 449: Marketing in Action

An advanced project-based course for students specializing in Marketing. Students will apply all concepts and frameworks learned from prior marketing courses. This course provides an experiential, project-based learning environment in which students will gain a personal feel for strategic marketing planning and decision making working for a real business client. Students will address critical decision issues involved in marketing planning at a strategic level, including segmentation and positioning, product development, customer acquisition and retention, brand management, marketing research, and the use of advertising and promotion. Particular emphasis will be placed on digital and social media marketing and it's increased role in communication and tracking results. The environment firms face today is increasingly complex and fast-changing. Hence, the core job of marketing -- attract, retain, grow customers; earn profits -- is ever more important. This course will attempt to provide the strategic marketing experience you will need to help jumpstart and succeed in your career.

Prerequisite: BUS Major; U4 Standing; BUS 348 and BUS 358

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

BUS 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

The continuation on a more advanced level of training in the techniques of organization and management in the teaching of business management courses. Students are expected to assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions, analyzing results of tests that have already been graded, and observing teaching. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: Grade of A or A- in the course in which the student is to assist and permission of undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

BUS 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

The continuation on a more advanced level of training in the techniques of organization and management in the teaching of business management courses. Students are expected to assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions, analyzing results of tests that have already been graded, and observing teaching. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisite: BUS 475 and permission of undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

BUS 487: Independent Research

Provides the opportunity for students to undertake a special independent project entailing advanced readings, reports, and discussion, or research on a topic of their own choosing with the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

0-3 credits

BUS 488: Internship

Participation in local, state, national, or international private enterprises, public agencies, or nonprofit institutions.

Prerequisites: BUS major; permission of undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

0-3 credits

BUS 495: Business Honors Program Thesis

The student writes the Business Honors program thesis for two semesters under the supervision of a faculty member thesis advisor and the program director to satisfy the requirements of the Business Honors Program. The thesis advisor will direct and assist the student as he or she develops the thesis topic, formulates the research hypotheses, performs the basic research, writes the thesis, and presents the thesis research. The faculty member will also assist the student in acquiring necessary knowledge in their area of research. Students are required to present their thesis at the Undergraduate Research and Creativity (URECA) program in April. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence BUS 495-496.

Prerequisite: Business Honors Program membership and department consent required.

3 credits

BUS 496: Business Honors Program Thesis

The student writes the Business Honors program thesis for two semesters under the supervision of a faculty member thesis advisor and the program director to satisfy the requirements of the Business Honors Program. The thesis advisor will direct and assist the student as he or she develops the thesis topic, formulates the research hypotheses, performs the basic research, writes the thesis, and presents the thesis research. The faculty member will also assist the student in acquiring necessary knowledge in their area of research. Students are required to present their thesis at the Undergraduate Research and Creativity (URECA) program in April. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence BUS 495-496.

Prerequisite: Business Honors Program membership and department consent required.

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

COM: Communication

COM 106: Introduction to Mass Media

A survey of the historical evolution, content, and structural elements of mass media. This introduction to social science research approaches to the study of mass communication enables participants to understand mass media's political, economic, social, psychological influences on individuals and broader U.S. society. Students examine the effect and impacts of mass communication on contemporary society and consider how global media influence and are influenced by U.S. media. This course is offered as both JRN 106 and COM 106.

Prerequisite: Journalism Major or Minor or Communication Major or Minor

SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

COM 120: Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Focuses on the core principles underlying effective oral presentations and the development of effective presentations in public and professional settings. There is an emphasis on analyzing audiences, composing meaningful, coherent messages, conducting responsible research, developing effective arguments, and improving delivery skills to strengthen confidence and credibility. Students will develop skills that lay the foundation for success in future speaking endeavors in both professional and personal settings. This course will also focus on how to make critical judgments as an audience to public discourse. Upon completion of this course students will be more confident and effective speakers and listeners.

SBC:     SPK

3 credits

COM 207: Media Writing

A hands-on approach to different forms of media writing online and in print. Careful examination of professional media writing enables students to understand informational and persuasive writing, evaluation, and judgement. Participants will understand the difference between journalistic writing and other forms of media writing and learn how media professionals construct different story forms based on ethical principles.

Prerequisite: Journalism Major or Minor or Communication Major or Minor

3 credits

COM 208: History of Mass Communication

A survey of the history of mass communication in the American colonies and the United States. Students examine the ways in which mass communication has shaped, and has been shaped by, technological, economic, political, social, and cultural changes across the globe. Students will apply the skills and tools used by historians and journalists to understand the presence of the past in their lives and the critical role they play in the ongoing history of mass communication. This course is offered as both JRN 208 and COM 208

Prerequisite COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

SBC:     USA

3 credits

COM 305: Mass Communication Law & Ethics

Provides students with a model by which they can analyze, understand, and act upon the law and ethical considerations that journalists and mass media professionals and consumers face in the 21st century. The class will use case studies, the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, the First Amendment Handbook from the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press, and current newsworthy stories to build an analytical model. This course is offered as both JRN 305 and COM 305

Prerequisite COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

3 credits

COM 306: Modes of Media Criticism

An introduction and overview of methods of criticism that guides participants to analyze contemporary forms of media and media culture. Students systematically work through different types of critical media analysis, including textual, production, and audience-centered approaches. Participants learn to situate these methodological approaches within a critical and cultural studies framework. Each methodological approach is paired with a screening and readings that model the respective forms of criticism being explored in class. Through hands-on analysis of media (television, film, Internet, video games, advertising, etc.) and application of media/cultural studies theory, participants build the required skills to produce methodologically rigorous critical media analyses.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

3 credits

COM 307: Critical Media Theory

An introduction to critical theory as it relates specifically to media and mass communication. The course will survey the most significant theoretical developments in media and cultural studies in a chronologically structured order, following the Frankfurt School through contemporary critical/cultural studies of the media to cover the diverse and important debate on the relationship between individuals, society, and the media we create and consume. Participants engage in thoughtful debate and undertake their own examination of a specific theory or body of theory.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status; one course that meets the HUM, ARTS, or LANG SBC requirements

SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

COM 316: Mass Communication Research Methods

A systematic overview of key contemporary research methods in media and mass communication. Based in social science methods, participants pursue a deeper understanding quantitative and qualitative research methods and provides opportunities for application through individual and team-based research projects. Participants will build on and apply their existing understanding of media and mass communication to understand the principles behind well conducted research, including the design of research questions, a range of methodological approaches, development and application of these approaches, and standards related to research on human subjects.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status; C or higher in JRN 106 or JRN 208; completion of the SBC QPS requirement

SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

COM 317: Mass Communication Theory

An overview of historical and contemporary theories of mass communication, media, and culture with particular focus on social and behavioral theory. The course covers key empirical theoretical perspectives on mass communication processes. We examine the foundations of theoretical inquiry and explore applications of theory.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

3 credits

COM 346: Race, Class, and Gender in Media

A critical examination of race, class, and gender in contemporary media. The class will explore traditional and social media to understand how identity and social configurations shape and are shaped by media. Participants will analyze how media industries and media representations relate to national and global diversity and explore theories that seek to explain media's role in representing race, class, and gender and how media influence our experience of diversity. Course participants will produce a collaboratively designed media project that comments on and challenges misrepresentations.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

3 credits

COM 351: Team Collaboration

This course takes a team science approach to enhance project-based, cross-disciplinary collaboration. There is an emphasis on small group communication for enhanced collaboration among team members who offer a range of expertise, perspectives, and experiences. Students will work together on a variety of short projects that seek to address community needs, both within Stony Brook University and the broader Long Island community. Each project requires students to answer complex questions, communicate effectively and efficiently in small group settings, and assess their team¿s ongoing performance. Through this process students will gain clarity on their own communication styles, and learn key communication skills for effective leaders.

Communication & Innovation Minor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

COM 365: Talking Science

Designed to help undergraduate students in the sciences communicate effectively and responsively with multiple audiences, from peers and professors to potential employers and the media. Rather than a bag of tricks and techniques, this course will push a shift in the students' understanding of communication: 1) audience-centered, 2) goaloriented, and 3) dynamic. Among the techniques we use are improvisational theatre exercises that will help you connect with an audience, pay close and dynamic attention to others, read non-verbal cues, and respond freely without self-consciousness. We also will strongly focus on storytelling as a medium through which this communication shift occurs.

SBC:     SPK

3 credits

COM 399: Topics in Mass Communication

Selected topics in Mass Communication. Topics may include U.S., international contexts. This course enables participants to engage with timely and contemporary issues in mass communication and media. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

COM 415: Data Analysis and Storytelling

A skill-building exploration of communicating empirical data to different audiences using stories. Using existing data, students practice interpreting data and implementing storytelling tools to create clarity and meaning within goal-oriented, narratives about topics from climate change, to population health, and plant science. Through the Alda Method® for science communication, students learn to engage in clear and vivid communication that ensures data is communicated with integrity and accuracy, which leads to improved understanding by the public, media, patients, elected officials, and others outside of their own discipline. The Alda Method® supports experiential learning by integrating teaching strategies from improvisational theater, communication, journalism, public health, and other relevant fields. This course is offered as both JRN 415 and COM 415

Prerequisite COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

SBC:     STAS

3 credits

COM 436: Environmental Communication

An overview of the growing field of Environmental Communication. Over the past decades, an important body of scholarship has emerged in Environmental Communication that includes a number of edited books, dozens of peer-reviewed publications in a wide range of prestigious journals, a series of edited conference proceedings, and an international, peer-reviewed journal, Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture. The course gives students an opportunity to participate in engaged research with a local community on an environmental or sustainability problem and link what they have learned through the course materials with action.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

COM 487: Independent Study

Intensive study of a special topic undertaken with close faculty supervision. May be repeated with a different topic.

0-6 credits, S/U grading

COM 491: Mass Communication Senior Project

A required capstone course for all mass communication majors. Students produce a major project that combines a strong research base with creative elements. Each project will have written, visual, and/or interactive components and must include a public outreach component. Students may choose between (1) a creative multimedia project (e.g., short film, documentary, podcast, etc.) that centers on a mass communication topic that is research-based, or (2) an academic research paper that is an original analysis of a mass communication topic (e.g., gender portrayals in the media). Students attend a weekly seminar and work independently to create public-facing work that meets professional standards. They interact with members of the community and because the work is publicly available, students are exposed to the full range of community response.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

SBC:     EXP+, WRTD

3 credits

COM 494: Mass Communication Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experiences to the faculty sponsor and the department. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing and permission of director of undergraduate studies

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

JRN: Journalism

JRN 101: News Literacy

How do you know if you're getting the truth from the news media? This course is designed to prepare students to become more discriminating news consumers. It will examine standards of reliability and accuracy in news gathering and presentation, and seek to establish the differences between news and propaganda, assertion and verification, bias and fairness, and infotainment and journalism. Students will be encouraged to critically examine news broadcasts, newspaper articles and websites. Visiting journalists will be questioned about the journalistic process and decision making.

Pre- or corequisite: WRT 101 or higher or equivalent, or permission of department

DEC:     B
SBC:     CER, SBS

3 credits

JRN 106: Introduction to Mass Media

A survey of the historical evolution, content, and structural elements of mass media. This introduction to social science research approaches to the study of mass communication enables participants to understand mass media's political, economic, social, psychological influences on individuals and broader U.S. society. Students examine the effect and impacts of mass communication on contemporary society and consider how global media influence and are influenced by U.S. media. This course is offered as both JRN 106 and COM 106.

Prerequisite: Journalism Major or Minor or Communication Major or Minor

SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

JRN 108: The History and Future of the American Press

This course traces the history of the American press from pre-American Revolution to post-Internet revolution. It examines the political, economic and technological forces that shaped the news media and how the press, in turn, influenced American government, politics and society. Topics will include freedom of the press, the rise of the popular press, war and the press, the press and presidents, the impact of investigative journalism, the evolution of radio and TV news, and the advent of 24/7 online news.

Pre- or corequisite: WRT 101 or higher or equivalent, or permission of department

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

JRN 111: Grammar and Editing Lab

To progress in the major and minor program, students must pass a grammar proficiency test as part of JRN 111, a grammar course that is co-requisite with JRN 110. The grammar course includes an eight-week immersion lab in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. In the ninth week, all students take a proficiency test. Those who pass are excused from the lab for the rest of the semester. All other students must continue attending the lab and will be required to take a second test on the last day of class.

Prerequisite: WRT 102; C or higher in JRN 101 or JRN 103; JRN 105

Corequisite: JRN 115

1 credit

JRN 115: News Reporting & Writing I

The second of a three semester sequence in the School of Journalism's Fundamentals of Reporting and Writing sequence. Students sharpen their ability to find and frame a well-focused story idea, apply advanced interviewing skills, learn the effective use of attribution and quotations, craft effective leads and "nut graphs" and become disciplined in writing to length and meeting deadlines. In this course, students write basic professional-level news ledes, news updates and live blogs on deadline and by the conclusion of the semester complete several news stories that are well-reported, well-written and stylistically acceptable, with an emphasis on accuracy and verification. Students are expected to maintain an ongoing engagement with current events.

Prerequisite: WRT 102; JRN 101 or JRN 103

Corequisite: JRN 111

3 credits

JRN 116: Introduction to Digital Journalism

An introduction to the fundamentals of journalistic reporting and storytelling in an interactive and immersive environment. Students will learn how to collect data and information using every tool in the journalistic arsenal, from notebooks and pens to online data collection. Students will begin the process of learning how to turn that core information into modern stories involving various elements such as text, audio, video, data visualization, and mapping - skills that will be built upon during other courses in the curriculum. Students will also explore how to use social tools both for information gathering and story amplification, and learn the philosophy that guides modern journalism: impartiality, ethical values and respect for accuracy. Students will build on their understanding of civic life and practice keeping pace with current events.

3 credits

JRN 205: News Reporting & Writing II

The final course in the School of Journalism's Fundamentals of Reporting and Writing sequence. Telling an effective story often means going beyond the basics and adding additional layers of reporting, including "color" and compelling anecdotal material, additional sources, independent verification of competing accounts, background and context, as well as providing a narrative organizational structure and the deployment of a variety of story approaches. In this course, students report and write more complex news stories, news feature stories, profiles and news trend stories, several of which are based on their own story ideas. In addition, students add multi-media elements to at least one story, employing the tools they have learned in the corequisite Introduction to Multimedia Skills lab.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 115 and grade of Satisfactory in JRN 111

Corequisite: JRN 215

3 credits

JRN 208: History of Mass Communication

A survey of the history of mass communication in the American colonies and the United States. Students examine the ways in which mass communication has shaped, and has been shaped by, technological, economic, political, social, and cultural changes across the globe. Students will apply the skills and tools used by historians and journalists to understand the presence of the past in their lives and the critical role they play in the ongoing history of mass communication. This course is offered as both JRN 208 and COM 208

SBC:     USA

3 credits

JRN 215: Introduction to Multimedia Skills Lab

Images and sound are critically important to journalists. In this lab, students will explore and apply basic skills in audio, video and photography. This lab will be divided into three sections: Four weeks of audio, five weeks of photography and five weeks of video. Students demonstrate proficiency with digital audio recorders, video and still cameras as well as proficiency in basic editing in all mediums.

Prerequisite: JRN 111 and C or higher in JRN 115

Corequisite: JRN 205

1 credit

JRN 216: Intermediate Digital Journalism

Teaches journalism students the tools necessary to tell stories in the digital age. Building on the core eporting concepts learned in JRN 116, students will use audio, still photography and video to communicate news stories to the public utilizing the standards and best practices of American broadcast journalism. Students will also work in teams to produce short newscasts (Newsbreak). This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: JRN 116

3 credits

JRN 217: Journalistic Reporting and Writing

A hands-on approach to reporting techniques and written journalism. Careful examination of professional news reporting and writing enables students to understand how journalists seek, verify and assemble information. Students then apply those insights to original reporting projects in a variety of traditional and innovative story forms, with close attention to grammar, usage, and style.

Prerequisite: JRN 116

3 credits

JRN 220: Media Law

Examines the legal issues that are encountered by journalists and other media professionals, including the First Amendment, libel, invasion of privacy, copyright law, and trademarks. Students also will examine ethical codes that guide journalists, including independence, truth-telling, accountability and protecting sources.

Prerequisite: major or minor in Journalism

2 credits

JRN 301: The Changing News Business

An inquiry into how the evolving media landscape in the digital age has changed journalism, and the ramifications for journalists and audiences. This course examines the advent of digital technology and the shifting patterns of media consumption, investment, ownership, and employment; regulatory changes; and the rise of nontraditional competition. Through readings and classroom discussion, students explore the effects of this revolution on content, standards, business models, news delivery, readership, viewership, and jobs. Guest speakers will discuss how today's changes are affecting their news organizations and their own careers.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 106

3 credits

JRN 303: Global Issues in Journalism

A study of global journalism of the 20th and 21st centuries, as it has been defined by the central topics of these times: mass migration, global warming, and the destruction of natural ecosystems; reparations, indigenous issues, and the advancement of global corporate media. This course studies the role of global journalism as opposed to mainstream American journalism and media, in the configuration of a media agenda and an image of the global society.

JRN Maj/Min: U3 or U4

SBC:     DIV, GLO

3 credits

JRN 305: Mass Communication Law & Ethics

Provides students with a model by which they can analyze, understand, and act upon the law and ethical considerations that journalists and mass media professionals and consumers face in the 21st century. The class will use case studies, the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, the First Amendment Handbook from the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press, and current newsworthy stories to build an analytical model. This course is offered as both JRN 305 and COM 305

JRN Maj/Min: U3 or U4

3 credits

JRN 310: Multimedia Newsroom I / Visual

Students are introduced to the skills needed to report and write news stories for television and radio. Students will become familiar with the proper use of pictures and sound in broadcast journalism, and become comfortable writing news reports in a variety of broadcast formats. Students also are expected to become familiar with a variety of broadcast production tools, including the basics of Final Cut Pro and video photography. Course includes a lecture and a weekly three-hour lab.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 210 or JRN 205 and a grade of satisfactory in JRN 211 or JRN 215

SBC:     SPK

3 credits

JRN 311: Advanced Digital Journalism - Text

An in-depth writing course that guides students through deeply reported and sophisticated stories that incorporate accompanying visuals, and are of publication quality. Building on the core reporting concepts learned in earlier skills courses, students will also write professional story pitches. All work will represent the highest standards in journalistic ethics and accuracy.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 216 and JRN 217

3 credits

JRN 312: Advanced Digital Journalism - Audio

An in-depth course in which students report, write, and produce a series of feature length pieces and podcasts that are of NPR style and broadcast quality. Building on the core reporting concepts learned in JRN 116, students will also write professional story pitches. All work will represent the highest standards in journalistic ethics and accuracy. Some assignments will require students to go off campus.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 216 and JRN 217

3 credits

JRN 313: Advanced Digital Journalism - Audio-Visual

Students will build on the fundamentals of visual storytelling taught in JRN 116 and JRN 216 by producing multimedia news stories to be published as part of the School of Journalism's digital platform. In addition to producing news stories, students gain experience in Studio and Control Room roles.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 216 and JRN 217

3 credits

JRN 316: Mass Communication Research Methods

A systematic overview of key contemporary research methods in media and mass communication. Based in social science methods, participants pursue a deeper understanding quantitative and qualitative research methods and provides opportunities for application through individual and team-based research projects. Participants will build on and apply their existing understanding of media and mass communication to understand the principles behind well conducted research, including the design of research questions, a range of methodological approaches, development and application of these approaches, and standards related to research on human subjects.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status; C or higher in JRN 106 or JRN 208; completion of the SBC QPS requirement

SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

JRN 317: Mass Communication Theory

An overview of historical and contemporary theories of mass communication, media, and culture with particular focus on social and behavioral theory. The course covers key empirical theoretical perspectives on mass communication processes. We examine the foundations of theoretical inquiry and explore applications of theory.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 319: The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture

Students will analyze the impact of conflicting images of journalists in movies and television on the American public's perception of journalists in the 20th and 21st centuries. The public adopts perceptions of journalists based on portrayals in the media, often without considering the accuracy and/or dramatization of these representations. Few people will ever witness a journalist in action. Yet many have very specific ideas of what journalists do because they have read about journalists in novels, short stories and comic books, and they have seen them in movies, television, plays, and cartoons. This class explores how these representations in the media contribute to public perceptions about journalists, and explores the trajectory of these perceptions from the days of silent films through the 21st century.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 320: Multimedia Newsroom II / Web

Examines the challenges presented by the explosion of journalism on the Internet and assesses the role of the journalist in an online society. Students are exposed to both practical skills and a broader understanding of issues. Topics include how journalists add value to information online, writing and editing for the Web, the use of interactive tools, blogs and podcasts, and an elementary understanding of web design. At the same time, students explore issues of privacy, the Internet's potential threat to traditional journalistic standards, and how online publishing is creating new audiences. Students will critique news web sites, participate in a blog and podcast, create a news Web page, and produce an online story package. Course includes a lecture and a weekly three-hour lab.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 210 or JRN 205 and a grade of satisfactory in JRN 211 or JRN 215

3 credits

JRN 333: Business Reporting

This course provides practical training for journalism students interested in a possible career in business reporting. It seeks to provide the basic understanding and skills to report on business and consumer news and economic trends. Goals include learning how to read and understand financial statements, how to identify and access relevant public documents, and how to interpret basic economic data and statistics. Students profile a public company on Long Island or in New York City, and learn how to write a business story that conforms to standards of accuracy and context. They will be encouraged to visit major financial institutions, public markets, and regulatory agencies in New York City. Students will also examine business stories and controversies in the news from the perspective of the business community and journalists.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 310

Advisory Prerequisites: ECO 108 and BUS 110

3 credits

JRN 334: Science and Health Reporting

Students will examine methods of evaluating and reporting science and health news with accuracy and context. Among the topics to be covered: how to read a medical journal article; how to understand simple statistical data; how to develop and interview expert sources; how to deal with conflicting claims. Drawing on the resources of the Health Sciences Center, the course also will provide information on how research and health care are organized and funded. Students will report and write several stories for print, broadcast or the Web. They also will spend a day shadowing a health care professional.

Prerequisites: C or higher in JRN 216 or JRN 217; 1 D.E.C. E or SNW; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS

3 credits

JRN 335: Reporting in New York City

This course, which is offered mainly in winter and summer sessions, provides students with an overview of how reporters cover major institutions in New York City. The semester focus varies, ranging from city hall, United Nations, police, courts, Wall Street, arts and culture, television, music, movies, theater, fashion and other city-centric themes. The course offers a blend of classroom instruction, talks with officials and journalists and hands-on reporting. On reporting days, the class will be run as a newsroom. May be repeated as the focus changes.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 216 and JRN 217; permission of the department

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

JRN 336: Sports Reporting

This course is designed to prepare students to report, write and produce sports stories in print, broadcast and online, from sports news to behind-the-scenes issues that resonate in the world of sports. Upon completion of this course, students should be as comfortable covering a government hearing on steroids in professional sports as covering a basketball game.

3 credits

JRN 337: Introduction to Narrative Journalism

Building on students' experiences in newswriting, this courses examines the reporting and writing of longer stories and more textured feature stories. There will be an emphasis on focus, structure, and storytelling, including the rudiments of developing style and a narrative voice. Students will be expected to write several original enterprise stories. They will also explore the similarities and differences in telling stories in print, online, and in broadcast formats.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 216 and JRN 217

3 credits

JRN 339: Foreign Reporting

An introduction to interpreting complicated events outside North America for domestic audiences at home through studying foreign correspondents, their practices, practicalities, tradecraft, ethics, scoops, successes, and failures. The course is situated in the context of understanding the geopolitics of information, cross-cultural studies, ethics, and identifying the impact of propaganda, and disinformation. This seminar format course focuses on key reporting techniques including identifying reliable sources, quickly analyzing complex situations, and writing and speaking, about them under time pressure.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 340: Beat Reporting

A hands-on course that gives students greater exposure to the skills and knowledge required to regularly cover various branches and functions of government or a topic area. Students develop a beat and write stories from that beat. Beats include local governments: village, town or county government, police, courts or a board of education or a topic such as the environment, transportation, immigration, education or health care issues on Long Island or a specific aspect of Stony Brook University. The course emphasizes identifying, developing, and maintaining sources. A special feature of this class is the opportunity to meet and learn from experienced journalists as well as government officials and public relations experts who offer a perspective on the media from their points of view. The basic reporting skills developed here are applicable to print, broadcast and the Internet. All stories handed in must be ready for publication.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 350: Journalistic Judgment and Ethics

Journalistic judgment-how and why decisions are made in the newsroom-examines the fundamentals of the editor or news director's role in print, broadcast and online news with emphasis on their impact on critical thinking, decision-making, maximizing accuracy, removing bias and providing diversity and context. Students will discuss journalistic judgment in print, broadcast and online news. The semester case studies and project will address fundamental judgment issues.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 205 and JRN 215

SBC:     CER, ESI

3 credits

JRN 355: Reporting in New York City - Broadcast

Offered mainly in winter and summer sessions, the course provides students with an overview of how broadcast journalists cover the major institutions in New York City: City Hall, the United Nations, the police department, the courts, Wall Street, etc. The course offers a blend of classroom instruction, talks with officials and journalists, and hands-on reporting. On reporting days, the class will be run as a newsroom. It is offered at the university's Manhattan extension.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 310 and permission of the department

3 credits

JRN 361: News Editing and Presentation/Print

Editors are the last line of defense. Their job is to catch and correct mistakes, make stories readable if they are not, write engaging headlines and captions, design pages that invite the reader, protect the publication's credibility, avoid libel, and otherwise exercise good news judgment. This course focuses on developing students' copyediting and page design skills. Mastery of grammar and of The Associated Press Stylebook are goals. The course will cover the art of photo selection, placement and cropping, and the use of graphics and other elements to enhance storytelling. Students will use Adobe InDesign to create attractive pages.

Prerequisites: C or higher in JRN 350 or permission of the department

Pre- or corequisite: JRN 364

3 credits

JRN 363: Magazine Writing

This course builds on JRN 337, advancing the exploration of long-form magazine stories. Students will learn how to develop ideas and craft them into sophisticated pieces with protagonists and strong narrative drive. They will learn to bring their stories to life using novelistic techniques such as character development, voice, mood and theme, conflict and resolution, scene-setting, foreshadowing and dialogue. Required reading assignments, group discussions of works-in-progress and roundtable meetings with professional narrative journalists will inspire students to develop their own writer's eye and voice. The culminating goal of the course is for each student to produce a 2,500-to-3,000-word story for publication. Students will also learn how to select a market for their stories and write a query letter.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 364: Advanced Reporting

Designed to help student journalists explore complex stories through probing reporting that unearths rich detail and context. Students will work under supervision of their "editor" (the instructor) to produce publication-quality works. The focus will be on "solutions journalism," with reporting in-depth on a single story spanning the semester. Classes will serve as a learning lab and newsroom, during which students will present their work to their editor and fellow reporters. They will pitch their ideas, explain in detail their reporting progress, brainstorm with fellow student journalists on story development and reporting strategies, share experiences, review each other's stories in progress, and, in general, help one another. Students will be graded on their success as a colleague, a reporter, and a writer.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 365: Talking Science

Designed to help undergraduate students in the sciences communicate effectively and responsively with multiple audiences, from peers and professors to potential employers and the media. Rather than a bag of tricks and techniques, this course will push a shift in the students' understanding of communication: 1) audience centered, 2) goal oriented, and 3) dynamic. Improvisational theatre exercises will help students connect with an audience, pay close and dynamic attention to others, read non-verbal cues, and respond freely without self-consciousness. There will be a strong focus on storytelling as a medium through which this communication shift occurs.

SBC:     SPK

3 credits

JRN 366: Press & the Presidency

Students examine the complex, difficult, co-dependent relationship between the news media and the president including the role of the press in a presidential campaign. The course includes a study of the historical relationship between the press and the president, the reasons for the fundamental deterioration of the press- White House relationship over the last 50 years, the impact of the digital revolution on the relationship, and whether voters can make an informed decision based on the information provided by the news media. This course is offered as both JRN 366 and POL 366.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 367: Opinion Journalism

A writing-intensive experience on the various aspects of opinion journalism, from columns to commentary, editorials, op-ed, blogs, reviews, and letters to the editor. What makes effective opinions? How does opinion journalism differ from news reporting? When do opinions and commentary qualify as journalism? When do they not qualify? What has been the historical role of opinion in journalism? How did it change and why? What impact has the internet and cable television had on opinion journalism and commentary? This course covers print, broadcast, and all forms of news media emphasizing the importance of reporting, critical thinking and clear writing.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 370: Advanced Visual Reporting and Storytelling

This course builds on the work of JRN 310 and is offered in a workshop/production environment. There is focus on mastering the reporting of breaking news, live reporting and developing story ideas. Emphasis also will be on shooting techniques. Students will produce longer-form reports.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 310

Pre- or corequisite: JRN 350

3 credits

JRN 371: Weekly Broadcast

Designed to introduce students to planning, assembling, producing and performing the elements of a newscast. Students will be exposed to the roles of key members of a newscast team, including producers, assistant producers, reporters, writers, anchors and video photographers and editors. There will be emphasis on developing decision-making and on-air skills, as students complete mini-newscasts and segments for broadcast. Students will be expected to meet strict deadlines and manage critical air time. Newscast segments will be showcased on JRN Web sites.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 370

3 credits

JRN 372: Introduction to Weathercasting

An introduction to weather casting with an emphasis on practical exercises and performance in a cutting-edge broadcast studio. Students will gain ease and poise delivering weather forecasts on camera using the latest equipment and technology in a professional setting with real-time constraints and challenges. Budding weathercasters will practice reporting and communicating critical meteorological news and be encouraged to find their personal voices and styles before the camera.

Prerequisite: ATM 102/103 or ATM 205; permission of department

1 credit, S/U grading

JRN 373: Advanced Weathercasting: Extreme and Hyperlocal

Advanced training for meteorology students who have completed JRN 372: Introduction to Weathercasting and want to continue exploring the coverage of extreme and local weather events such as hurricanes. Students will practice performing live under deadline pressure to acquire ease and a personal style before the camera. This class takes advantage of padcaster technology to put weathercasters in the field for live remote broadcasts. The goal of the class is to prepare students to qualify for The American Meteorological Society¿s Certified Broadcast Meteorologist Program.

Prerequisite: ATM 102/103 or ATM 205; grade of B or higher in JRN 372; permission of department

1 credit, S/U grading

JRN 380: Multimedia Photojournalism

This course, designed for students interested in specializing in online news, will focus on content management and the presentation of news on the Web. Students will have the opportunity to manage a news website in real time, with emphasis on around-the-clock news judgment and presentation. Students will learn how to enhance online news through multimedia integration and reader/viewer interactivity. Students also will study information architecture, eye-tracking studies and different ways of making the Web more accessible for readers, including layering information. After completion of course overview material, students will move through three phases designed to simulate a key role in current online newsrooms. The phases include real-time content management, multi-media integration and harvesting original video. There will be emphasis on building critical thinking skills and developing team work. By the end of this course, students are to produce a complete multimedia project and integrate its production into a real-time online news site.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 320

Pre- or corequisite: JRN 350 or permission of the department

3 credits

JRN 381: Web Presentation

Students will combine their advanced journalistic skills in reporting, writing and producing with advanced multimedia techniques to create an online "microsite" devoted to one major story, combining text with video, photos, blogs and interactive features. This course builds on skills acquired in JRN 380. Significant computer use will be required outside of class time.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 380

3 credits

JRN 390: Special Topics in Journalism

This special topics course will deal with timely and contemporary issues that affect journalists and journalism. The issues could range from the press in wartime to how the press covers presidential campaigns. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 391: Journalism Workshops

These workshops are designed to assist students in developing skills that will be useful in various journalism courses. Topics will rotate. Anticipated topics include On-Air Presentation, Audio Journalism, Digital Photography, Databases, FOIL and Sunshine Laws, On-Air Performance, Editing Software. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Varies by topic, permission of the department

1-2 credits

JRN 392: Special Topics: Issues in Contemporary Journalism-Journalism Without Walls Prep

This 1-credit workshop is designed to help students prepare if they are interested in taking JRN 435 Journalism Without Walls, a course in which students travel with journalism faculty to a location and spend several weeks reporting, writing and broadcasting from and about it. Each Journalism Without Walls Prep is tailored to the specific locale and coverage issues. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: To be taken before JRN 435

1 credit

JRN 393: Audio Journalism Lab

This 1-credit audio lab is designed to assist students in developing skills that will be useful in various broadcast courses and to prepare them for radio and podcasting internship opportunities. Digital recorders will be provided for use in and out of class. An emphasis will be on the skills needed to produce long-form radio reports and podcasts in the tradition of National Public Radio. The lab meets once a week for three hours. Some assignments will require students to go off campus.

Prerequisite: JRN 215

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit

JRN 411: Television Practicum

This is a capstone course for students specializing in video. This day-long workshop class meets on Fridays from 9 am to 6 pm, with an hour break for lunch. Each week, students will produce and broadcast a half-hour, live newscast that will be broadcast on the Web and on a campus news channel. The class will experience the working conditions of a professional TV newsroom. Over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to work in each of they key jobs necessary for a successful newscast: broadcast producer, news director, anchor, field producer, reporter, video editor and member of the studio crew. Following each newscast, the news team will gather for a "post-mortem" meeting. At this meeting, work will be critiqued and plans will be made for follow-up stories and the next week's newscast. The post mortem will serve as a weekly assessment for the students.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 370 and permission of the instructor

Pre- or co-requisite: JRN 371

3 credits

JRN 413: Journalisms of the Global South

A historical and socio-communicational exploration of the genres and styles of journalism emerging and shaping the different regions of the Global South since the early mercantile expansion of the 17th century and into the 21st century. In parallel with the colonial push into the Americas, Asia and the Pacific, journalistic narratives start to shape the Western view of the new worlds. But the process has a dual nature: these styles and genres are appropriated, re-signified and repurposed locally, giving birth to an array of journalisms that do not conform with their Western counterparts. Crónicas, corridos, roman feuilleton, and a vast number of other forms of journalisms born in the Global South are discussed during this course. The class aims at expanding the Western idea of journalism as the watchdog of democracy, and to understanding journalism in the Global South in its historical context, within its political, pedagogical and literary roles.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 415: Data Analysis and Storytelling

A skill-building exploration of communicating empirical data to different audiences using stories. Using existing data, students practice interpreting data and implementing storytelling tools to create clarity and meaning within goal-oriented, narratives about topics from climate change, to population health, and plant science. Through the Alda Method® for science communication, students learn to engage in clear and vivid communication that ensures data is communicated with integrity and accuracy, which leads to improved understanding by the public, media, patients, elected officials, and others outside of their own discipline. The Alda Method® supports experiential learning by integrating teaching strategies from improvisational theater, communication, journalism, public health, and other relevant fields. This course is offered as both JRN 415 and COM 415

JRN Maj/Min: U3 or U4

SBC:     STAS

3 credits

JRN 433: Journalistic Book and Serial Narrative Production

A contemporary approach to factual long-form and serial storytelling based on the study of narrative theory. We explore western and non-western contemporary literary journalism in written and audio-based formats. Participants conduct research as a basis for producing an individual or group project. Individuals may produce a pitch, prospectus, or a book proposal and then complete the first chapter of a long-form narrative. Groups may develop a collaborative proposal and produce a first episode of a serial podcast. Formative research will include interviews, documentary research, and a summary of the core ideas proposed in the book or podcast. The work is based on class analysis and the ideas explored during the semester.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 434: Photojournalism

An introduction to operating as a reporter empowered by effective news and feature photography skills. Students will develop judgement in how to tell stories visually through experiential mastery of digital camera picture taking and editing skills. They will develop a critical eye to determine what makes a great photograph, understand effective forms of visual communication, and master techniques in making photographic images. Students will take a hands on approach to craft photographs that convey emotions and have impact in delivering the news. Picture selection, cropping, captions as well as the ethics of photographic presentations in era of easy image manipulation are emphasized. Students add to their visual toolbox of reporting skills through lessons focused making stronger photographs under time pressures.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status and major in Journalism, or permission of instructor

3 credits

JRN 435: Journalism Without Walls

Offered only during winter or summer sessions, this course is designed for experienced and energetic journalism students. Students will be assigned as part of a team to travel to a location and using only mobile technology, transmit stories and video from the field. Their work will be published via a special website. Students will have one week to research a topic or location before leaving for their destination. (Teams of students, for example, have gone to China, Russia, Cuba and the U.S. Gulf Coast.) While on assignment, students file blogs, gather multimedia and video, write and edit stories, produce a website and establish a "mobile newsroom." One or several instructors accompany the students. This course combines students' journalistic skills, judgment and enterprise with knowledge of emerging technology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: permission of the department, additional prerequisites announced by topic. Passport may be required.

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

JRN 438: Weathercasting & Environmental Reporting

A practicum for upper division meteorology majors and advanced journalism students preparing for post college careers as local television/radio weathercasters, resident environmental reporters, and off-screen producers. The course centers on performance and production of a bi-weekly TV studio-based broadcast.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

3 credits

JRN 444: Experiential Learning

This course is designed for students who engage in a substantial, structured experiential learning activity in conjunction with another class. Experiential learning occurs when knowledge acquired through formal learning and past experience are applied to a "real-world" setting or problem to create new knowledge through a process of reflection, critical analysis, feedback and synthesis. Beyond-the-classroom experiences that support experiential learning may include: service learning, mentored research, field work, or an internship.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent; permission of the instructor and approval of the EXP+ contract (http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/bulletin/current/policiesandregulations/degree_requirements/EXPplus.php)

SBC:     EXP+

0 credit, S/U grading

JRN 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled courses. The student must attend all classes and carry out tasks assigned by the faculty member to assist in teaching the course. The student will meet with the instructor on a regular basis to discuss intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. Not for major or minor credit.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4; Permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

JRN 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled courses. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that already have been graded. The course in which the student is permitted to work as a teaching assistant must be different from the course in which he or she previously participated. Not for major or minor credit.

Prerequisites: grade of satisfactory in JRN 475; permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

JRN 487: Independent Study

Intensive study of a special topic undertaken with close faculty supervision. May be repeated with a different topic.

Prerequisite: Permission of director of undergraduate studies

0-6 credits, S/U grading

JRN 488: Internship

Students work at local, state, and national news organizations. The work must involve journalistic skills related to the educational goals of the department. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experiences.

SBC:     EXP+

0-12 credits, S/U grading

JRN 489: Specialized Internship

Students work in campus departments or at local, state and national organizations. The work must involve a professional experience using journalistic skills in alignment with the educational goals of the department. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experiences.

SBC:     EXP+

0-12 credits, S/U grading

JRN 490: Senior Project

This is a capstone course and a requirement for all journalism majors. Students produce an in-depth story of professional quality in written form, visually and with interactive elements. Students attend a weekly seminar and work independently. A secondary goal of the course is to prepare students for career opportunities upon graduation. Students leave with a multiplatform portfolio.

Prerequisite: C or higher in JRN 311 or JRN 312 or JRN 313

SBC:     EXP+, WRTD

3 credits

JRN 491: Mass Communication Senior Project

A required capstone course for all mass communication majors. Students produce a major project that combines a strong research base with creative elements. Each project will have written, visual, and/or interactive components and must include a public outreach component. Students may choose between (1) a creative multimedia project (e.g., short film, documentary, podcast, etc.) that centers on a mass communication topic that is research-based, or (2) an academic research paper that is an original analysis of a mass communication topic (e.g., gender portrayals in the media). Students attend a weekly seminar and work independently to create public-facing work that meets professional standards. They interact with members of the community and because the work is publicly available, students are exposed to the full range of community response.

Prerequisite JRN Maj/Min or COM Maj/Min; and U3 or U4 status

SBC:     EXP+, WRTD

3 credits