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5/10/2018 Fuel Cells and Internal Combustion - a New Approach for Hybrid EnginesA team of researchers from the Department of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (CEAS) are developing hybrid engines unlike others used in industry today. Supported by a new two-year $2.3 million award from the Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), the research involves developing and testing engines powered by internal combustion, such as gasoline or natural gas, and fuel cells.
5/7/2018 DOE Supports PhD Student's Research on an Elementary ParticleSamuel Homiller, a PhD student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University is among a group of students selected nationally as a recipient of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program award. The award supports the research of graduate students in STEM fields with a $3,000 per month stipend and an opportunity to conduct part of their thesis-related research at DOE laboratories. Homiller's award runs the duration of the 2018-19 academic year.
5/4/2018 Breathing Lunar Dust Could Pose Health Risk to Future AstronautsFuture astronauts spending long periods of time on the Moon could suffer bronchitis and other health problems by inhaling tiny particles of dust from its surface, according to new research. A new study from researchers at Stony Brook University finds simulated lunar soil is toxic to human lung and mouse brain cells. Up to 90 percent of human lung cells and mouse neurons died when exposed to dust particles that mimic soils found on the Moon's surface.
4/25/2018 Stony Brook Professor Named European Inventor Award FinalistEsther Sans Takeuchi, PhD, a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry in the College of Arts & Sciences and in Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University, Chief Scientist of the Energy Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the holder of more than 150 patents has been named a finalist for the European Inventor Award. The European Patent Office (EPO) selected Professor Takeuchi as a finalist in the category of "Non-EPO countries." The winners of the EPO's 2018 innovation prize will be announced at a ceremony in Paris on June 7.
4/19/2018 New Imaging Method Identifies How Normal and Cancer Cells Move and AdaptAn international team of scientists including David Q. Matus, PhD, and Benjamin L. Martin, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Stony Brook University Cancer Center researchers, have developed a new cell imaging technology combining lattice light sheet microscopy (LLSM) and adaptive optics (AO) to create high-resolution "movies" of cells in their 3D environment that also captures subcellular processes. Published in Science, the research reveals a technology that shows the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and in conditions such as mitosis, immune processes and in metastases.
4/5/2018 New Rapid-Fire Method Using Pathology Images, Tumor Data May Help Guide Cancer TherapiesBy combining data on pathology images of 13 types of cancer and correlating that with clinical and genomic data, a Stony Brook University-led team of researchers are able to identify tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), called TIL maps, which will enable cancer specialists to generate tumor-immune information from routinely gathered pathology slides. Published in Cell Reports, the paper details how TIL maps are related to the molecular characterization of tumors and patient survival.
3/27/2018 New Technology Cleans Solar Panels to Enhance EfficiencyA technology in development that uses electric fields to sweep dust from solar panels has promise as a new self-cleaning solar panel system designed to enhance energy efficiency and reduce costs. The technology was created in the laboratory of Stony Brook University Professor Alex Orlov and is being further developed by a Stony Brook research team named SolarClear.
3/20/2018 High-Tech Imaging of Ancient Crocs Helps Define How Species EvolveScientists believe that anatomical variation within and between species is the raw material for natural selection. However, the prevalence of convergent evolution, or the repeated evolution of highly similar yet complex forms among distantly related animals, suggests the presence of underlying general principles (or "rules") of evolution. Now Alan Turner, PhD, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, along with colleagues at the University and at Oklahoma State University are conducting research they believe will help to unlock the rules of evolution. Their research is funded by a $579,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.
3/13/2018 Medieval Barbarians Likely Imported Brides With Elongated Heads From Southeastern EuropeAn international research team including Krishna Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University, has performed the first genomic analysis of populations that lived on the former territory of the Roman Empire from around 500 AD. The analysis provides a direct look at the complex population movements during the era known as the European Migration Period. The palaeogenomic study, published in PNAS, investigated early human medieval genomic variation in southern Germany, with a specific investigation of the peculiar phenomenon of artificial skull formation, the origins of which scientists have debated for more than 50 years.
3/8/2018 Seeking Truth in Science: Meta-Analysis as a KeyFiguring out what is true in science when researchers are bombarded with information from many different studies is a challenge. A new paper, published in Nature, reveals that the power of meta-analysis in research synthesis over the past 40 years has transformed scientific thinking and research approaches. Meta-analysis has also become invaluable to making advances in many scientific fields, including medicine and ecology.
3/2/2018 Breaking Through Disparities, Advancing Women in MedicineWomen have practiced medicine and conducted biomedical and other scientific research for decades, yet disparities remain at the highest levels in academic medicine. On March 7, more than 150 Stony Brook University women faculty and students will assemble at the School of Medicine's 12th Women in Medicine Research Day to celebrate the achievements of women researchers, discuss issues women continue to face during medial training and the workplace, and share their own research in a networking environment.
3/2/2018 "Supercolony" of Adélie Penguins Discovered in AntarcticaFor the past 40 years, the total number of Adélie Penguins, one of the most common on the Antarctic peninsula, has been steadily declining--or so biologists have thought. A new study led by Stony Brook University ecologist Heather Lynch and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, is providing new insights on this species of penguin.
2/16/2018 Integrated Gas Energy Technology Institute Launches at Stony Brook UniversityStony Brook University and National Grid have launched the country's most comprehensive Institute of Gas Innovation and Technology.
2/6/2018 New Drug Target Emerges for a Dangerous Fungal PathogenThe Cryptococcus neogormans fungal pathogen is deadly. Now a team of researchers led by Stony Brook University scientists have discovered a novel gene that helps understand the mechanism of survival of this pathogen in various host conditions.
1/31/2018 Fossil Evidence Shows Bats Colonized from Islands to ContinentsPlants and animals are generally thought to colonize from continents to islands, over time leading to the evolution of separate island species.
1/26/2018 Mammals Moving Less in Human Landscapes May Upset EcosystemsCould baboons and other mammals worldwide soon need pedometers? A new study reveals that on average, mammals move less in human-modified landscapes.
1/19/2018 Can Using Theatrical Techniques Improve Social Skills of Autistic Youths?A new study examines the benefit of combining theatrical techniques with behavioral treatment approaches for autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
1/17/2018 A Survival Lesson from Bats - Eating Variety Keeps Species MultiplyingDiet is an important factor influencing the survival and evolution of all species. Many studies have shown that when species evolve from being a predator or insectivore to being a vegetarian, the rate at which new species arise increases. But a new study published in Ecology Letters reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more generations in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species.
12/29/2017 Top 10 Moments of 2017 at Stony Brook UniversityStony Brook University is sharing a look back at some its most significant moments from 2017.
12/22/2017 Emerging Drug Could Help Treat a Common Liver DiseaseTreating a liver disease called NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), which affects 10 to 15 percent of obese individuals with type-2 diabetes worldwide, is difficult. But now scientists believe they have found a pharmacologic approach that may inhibit NASH, and thus stop deadly conditions that result from NASH such as cirrhosis and liver cancer.
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