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3/20/2018 High-Tech Imaging of Ancient Crocs Helps Define How Species EvolveScientists believe that anatomical variation within and between species is the raw material for natural selection. However, the prevalence of convergent evolution, or the repeated evolution of highly similar yet complex forms among distantly related animals, suggests the presence of underlying general principles (or "rules") of evolution. Now Alan Turner, PhD, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, along with colleagues at the University and at Oklahoma State University are conducting research they believe will help to unlock the rules of evolution. Their research is funded by a $579,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.
3/13/2018 Medieval Barbarians Likely Imported Brides With Elongated Heads From Southeastern EuropeAn international research team including Krishna Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University, has performed the first genomic analysis of populations that lived on the former territory of the Roman Empire from around 500 AD. The analysis provides a direct look at the complex population movements during the era known as the European Migration Period. The palaeogenomic study, published in PNAS, investigated early human medieval genomic variation in southern Germany, with a specific investigation of the peculiar phenomenon of artificial skull formation, the origins of which scientists have debated for more than 50 years.
3/8/2018 Seeking Truth in Science: Meta-Analysis as a KeyFiguring out what is true in science when researchers are bombarded with information from many different studies is a challenge. A new paper, published in Nature, reveals that the power of meta-analysis in research synthesis over the past 40 years has transformed scientific thinking and research approaches. Meta-analysis has also become invaluable to making advances in many scientific fields, including medicine and ecology.
3/2/2018 Breaking Through Disparities, Advancing Women in MedicineWomen have practiced medicine and conducted biomedical and other scientific research for decades, yet disparities remain at the highest levels in academic medicine. On March 7, more than 150 Stony Brook University women faculty and students will assemble at the School of Medicine's 12th Women in Medicine Research Day to celebrate the achievements of women researchers, discuss issues women continue to face during medial training and the workplace, and share their own research in a networking environment.
3/2/2018 "Supercolony" of Adélie Penguins Discovered in AntarcticaFor the past 40 years, the total number of Adélie Penguins, one of the most common on the Antarctic peninsula, has been steadily declining--or so biologists have thought. A new study led by Stony Brook University ecologist Heather Lynch and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, is providing new insights on this species of penguin.
2/16/2018 Integrated Gas Energy Technology Institute Launches at Stony Brook UniversityStony Brook University and National Grid have launched the country's most comprehensive Institute of Gas Innovation and Technology.
2/6/2018 New Drug Target Emerges for a Dangerous Fungal PathogenThe Cryptococcus neogormans fungal pathogen is deadly. Now a team of researchers led by Stony Brook University scientists have discovered a novel gene that helps understand the mechanism of survival of this pathogen in various host conditions.
1/31/2018 Fossil Evidence Shows Bats Colonized from Islands to ContinentsPlants and animals are generally thought to colonize from continents to islands, over time leading to the evolution of separate island species.
1/26/2018 Mammals Moving Less in Human Landscapes May Upset EcosystemsCould baboons and other mammals worldwide soon need pedometers? A new study reveals that on average, mammals move less in human-modified landscapes.
1/19/2018 Can Using Theatrical Techniques Improve Social Skills of Autistic Youths?A new study examines the benefit of combining theatrical techniques with behavioral treatment approaches for autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
1/17/2018 A Survival Lesson from Bats - Eating Variety Keeps Species MultiplyingDiet is an important factor influencing the survival and evolution of all species. Many studies have shown that when species evolve from being a predator or insectivore to being a vegetarian, the rate at which new species arise increases. But a new study published in Ecology Letters reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more generations in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species.
12/29/2017 Top 10 Moments of 2017 at Stony Brook UniversityStony Brook University is sharing a look back at some its most significant moments from 2017.
12/22/2017 Emerging Drug Could Help Treat a Common Liver DiseaseTreating a liver disease called NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), which affects 10 to 15 percent of obese individuals with type-2 diabetes worldwide, is difficult. But now scientists believe they have found a pharmacologic approach that may inhibit NASH, and thus stop deadly conditions that result from NASH such as cirrhosis and liver cancer.
12/19/2017 New Occupancy Detection Device Designed to Save Home Energy UsePhotoelectric infrared (PIR) sensors are the current choice for occupancy presence detection in buildings. The sensors are used for smart thermostats to control heating and cooling based on occupancy. A major problem is that these PIR sensors only detect individuals who are moving. A Stony Brook University research team is developing a new type of PIR sensor that is equipped with an electronic shutter and other technologies that enable fast and accurate occupancy detection including individuals who are stationary.
12/15/2017 Computer Scientist and Biomedical Engineer Named Fellows of the National Academy of InventorsArie Kaufman, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, and Clinton Rubin, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University have been elected as Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).
12/14/2017 Wealth Inequality Increased in Ancient Times with Animal DomesticationAn analysis of 63 archaeological sites across North America, Europe, Asia and Africa by a team of international scientists, including Elizabeth Stone from the Department of Anthropology, revealed that wealth inequality increased over time and was tied to the rise of animal domestication. Published in Nature, the study used house size as a measure of wealth.
12/12/2017 Study Reveals Skin Pigmentation Heredity is Not Straight ForwardMany studies suggest that the genetics of skin pigmentation are simple, as a small number of known genes account for nearly 50 percent of pigment variation. A new study published in Cell counters this scientific view and suggests that while skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is not a straightforward trait in humans.
12/5/2017 New Reef Aims to Bring Oysters Back to Long IslandThe first oyster reef on Long Island has been installed in Shinnecock Bay by Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) researchers. The installation is a conservation effort to rejuvenate oyster reproduction on Long Island and help improve and maintain clean water.
11/29/2017 New Nursing PhD Program Answers Need for More Nurse ScientistsThe Stony Brook University School of Nursing is launching a PhD in Nursing that will begin in the summer of 2018. The PhD in Nursing Program emphasizes education and training at the highest level in order to develop the next generation of nurse scientists and educators skilled in research methodologies useful in all areas of nursing science to improve the health and well-being of the population.
11/22/2017 Stony Brook University President's Statement on Tax ReformIn response to recent Congressional tax reform negotiations, Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., said today "As tax reform negotiations continue, I urge leaders in Congress to consider the adverse impacts of proposed provisions on students, research and the State of New York. The provisions proposed would significantly increase costs for graduate students, hurt institutional stability by bringing about a reduction in charitable giving, and result in a decrease in federal funding availability for research and financial aid. In addition, the elimination of the state and local income tax deduction (SALT) would cause a brain drain in New York, resulting in a reduction in state services and support for areas like higher education. Increasing the tax burden on students and universities will make quality higher education less accessible and limit groundbreaking research conducted in the United States.
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