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4/23/2018 (Futurity) New imaging combo shows how cancer cells moveScientists have developed a new cell imaging technology that creates high-resolution "movies" of cells in their 3D environment and captures subcellular processes. Published in Science, the research reveals a technology that shows the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and in conditions such as mitosis, immune processes, and in metastases.
4/23/2018 (New York Times) Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, ThriveDr. Gabrielle Carlson said that she grew up with a brother who had attention problems, "and I was the perfect older sister." She is a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine who became a child psychiatrist, in part, she said, because of an interest in these symptoms and in what could help.
4/23/2018 (The Hechinger Report) Are America's colleges promoting social mobility?Back in the 1980s, Derek Peterson was admitted to Stony Brook University in New York as part of a special program for low-income students who show potential but aren't fully prepared for college. "There were a lot of people who said you're not going to be able to do it," he says. "The school is really tough." But he did do it. Peterson graduated in 1988 with a degree in computer science and applied mathematics. Now he's a wealthy tech entrepreneur and he's setting up a scholarship at Stony Brook to honor his father, who never finished college.
4/23/2018 (ABC News) Can being cold help you lose weight?Dr. Roshini Malaney is a cardiology fellow at Stony Brook University Hospital in Stony Brook, New York, and is working with the ABC News Medical Unit. She writes, No one likes to be cold enough to shiver, but what if being cold could actually increase your metabolism, improve blood sugar and help you lose weight? A study done on mice at the University of Tokyo supports this idea. The researchers found that a certain type of cells called beige fat can actively break down fat and sugar to improve insulin sensitivity and increase metabolism. Beige fat was also found to help regulate energy balance."
4/23/2018 (New York Times) Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, ThriveDr. Gabrielle Carlson said that she grew up with a brother who had attention problems, "and I was the perfect older sister." She is a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine who became a child psychiatrist, in part, she said, because of an interest in these symptoms and in what could help.
4/23/2018 (Futurity) New imaging combo shows how cancer cells moveScientists have developed a new cell imaging technology that creates high-resolution "movies" of cells in their 3D environment and captures subcellular processes....In the paper, professors David Q. Matus and Benjamin L. Martin, both of the Stony Brook University Cancer Center and department of biochemistry and cell biology, used AO-LLSM to capture and visualize the behavior of human breast cancer cells injected into zebrafish vasculature.
4/21/2018 (Newsday) Activists at Earth Day symposium discuss ways to clean up LI waterAndrew Griffith, a marine biologist from Stony Brook University, said fertilizers and wastewater from homes were creating large amounts of nitrogen that eventually funnel out to Long Island shorelines. The nitrogen attracts harmful algae like brown tide and rust tide, which gathers in large blooms.
4/19/2018 (Medical Express) New drugs using the body's endocannabinoids to treat pain, cancerA new technology developed by Stony Brook University researchers affiliated with the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (ICB & DD) that has identified Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs) as drug targets of the body's endocannabinoid system is licensed to Artelo Biosciences, Inc. Endocannabinoids are natural marijuana-like substances in the body and have potential as the basis for new medicines. Artelo has an exclusive license with the Research Foundation for the State University of New York to the intellectual property portfolio of FABP inhibitors for the modulation of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of pain, inflammation and cancer.
4/20/2018 (Glacier Hub) Photo Friday: A Visit to Sajama, BoliviaThis Photo Friday, journey to Sajama, Bolivia, through photos taken by Karina Yager, a professor at the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University, on her recent trip to the country. Joining two Bolivian scientists, Rosa Isela Meneses and Humber Alberto, from the Bolivian National Herbarium and the Natural History Museum, the trio conducted a field survey at Sajama National Park, monitoring vegetation change in bofedales (high Andean peatlands).
4/18/2018 (Men's Health) This Man's Genes Have Left Him Battling Early Onset Alzheimer's at 45Matt Oliver lost his mother, brother, and sister to a form of early onset Alzheimer's disease. Then, at 41 years old, he learned that he has the irreversible condition, too..."This is very different than what you would call traditional Alzheimer's," Dr. Nikhil Palekar, medical director of the Stony Brook Center of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease, told MensHealth.com. He explained that people diagnosed with Oliver's genetic condition have a mutation on one of three genes: PS1, PS2, or APP.
4/18/2018 (LI News Radio) Stony Brook Medicine's James Vosswinkel LIVE on LI in the AM w/ Jay OliverStony Brook Medicine's Dr. James Vosswinkel talks about "Stop the Bleed" to host Jay Oliver.
4/18/2018 (Sag Harbor Express) Experts Say More is Needed to Combat Tick DiseaseTo mark the start of what has commonly become known on the East End as "tick season," Stony Brook University held a symposium last week at the university's Health Sciences Center titled "The Tick-Borne Diseases Epidemic; the Stony Brook Medicine Experience."
4/17/2018 (Newsday) Panel: Men must speak up in fight against sexual harassmentWhen men witness women being sexually harassed in the office, they must speak up, a panelist said Tuesday at a Woodbury discussion. "We have to challenge other men," panelist Michael Kimmel, a professor of sociology and gender studies at Stony Brook University told the morning meeting at the Crest Hollow Country Club. "We must be a part of this.
4/17/2018 (ABC News) Here's why you need to start asking your doctor to check your blood pressure twiceDr. Roshini Malaney is a Cardiology Fellow at Stony Brook University Hospital working with the ABC News Medical Unit and writes, "Checking your blood pressure is a mainstay of every medical checkup. Now, there's some new medical advice on this seemingly mundane part of a wellness visit to the doctor.So, what's the new medical advice?Get your blood pressure checked twice, a new study advises."
4/17/2018 (Look to the Stars) Stars of Stony Brook University Gala Honoring Dorothy Lichtenstein Raises $7.1 MillionNearly 700 guests gathered on Wednesday evening at Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers to honor one of America's most dedicated and energetic art and education benefactors, Dorothy Lichtenstein, at the annual Stars of Stony Brook Gala.
4/17/2018 (OZY) This Economist Wants To Change the Meaning of MoneyImagine an end to Washington spending wars that leave filibustering senators blue in the face. Economist Stephanie Kelton does. She sees a world where the federal government can build a big, beautiful social safety net, strengthen the military and, for good measure, cut taxes on the rich. The government, in her eyes, can spend as much as it wants on anything without the bill coming due. Welcome to Modern Monetary Theory -- a bizarro world that might not be as far-fetched as it sounds.
4/17/2018 (ReachMD) Tick-borne Diseases Reach Epidemic LevelsTick-borne infections have reached epidemic proportions on Long Island, where children are disproportionately affected by Lyme disease and other infections transmitted by the eight-legged creatures, a panel of top scientists announced recently. "Lyme disease is mostly a disease of children and curiously mostly a disease of boys," Jorge Benach said at a recent symposium at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. Benach, who discovered the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, is a molecular geneticist at Stony Brook University School of Medicine.
4/14/2018 (Suffolk Times) Saving a life, one donation at a timeLast Thursday, Robert Verbeck, a fifth-grade teacher in the Shoreham-Wading River School District, arrived at the hospital where he's been so many times before. Wearing a gray T-shirt and jeans, the 53-year-old relaxed in a chair as a nurse connected his arm to a machine that would filter blood out of his body and then back in for nearly two hours, a process that spins the platelets out while preserving his blood. Unlike regular blood donations, for which two-month intervals are required, donors can repeat the platelet process every two weeks, allowing up to 24 in a year.
4/14/2018 (Newsday) Emerging T-cell therapy holds promise in fighting cancerSophisticated therapy that enlists the body to fight cancers of the blood by priming a component of the immune system to strike a specific target is in the vanguard of innovative approaches to malignancies.The emerging treatments -- known as CAR T-cell therapy -- are customized to each patient, whose T cells are isolated from a blood sample and then activated in a laboratory to zero in on a bull's-eye.Stony Brook University Hospital doctors are developing their own CAR T-cell treatment and plan to offer it to patients through a clinical trial within three months -- at no charge.
4/16/2018 (Times Beacon Record) Stony Brook University's Maurizio Del Poeta explores multiple sclerosis drug's fungal side effectSwiss pharmaceutical giant Novartis contacted Stony Brook University fungal expert Maurizio Del Poeta, a professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology, to understand how the drug fingolimid opens the door to this opportunistic and problematic infection. He is also exploring other forms of this drug to determine if tweaking it can allow the benefits without opening the door to problematic infections.
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