Health Sciences Bulletin

School of Medicine

  • All Courses

    All Courses

    View all courses

    HBA 325 - Anatomical/Bio Illustration

    This course will offer an introduction to human anatomy for the studio artist who is interested in biological illustration. It will provide an introduction to techniques of illustration utilizing as subject matter the live model, skeleton, prosection and cadaver dissection. Details of human anatomy will often be discussed by comparison of humans with other vertebrates.Lectures will precede each lab/studio class and involve topics such as size and shape, developmental changes in proportion, topographic and surface anatomy, bone-muscle relationships and human movement, comparative form of visceral organs, and the comparative anatomy of humans and higher primates. This course will be open to all students who have had introduction to life drawing (or its equivalent) and/or introduction to the biological sciences (or its equivalent). We expect that this offering will benefit artists who are interested in developing their representational drawing skills and enhancing their knowledge of anatomy and morphology, AND students in the life sciences who are interested in enhancing their drawing skills. This course is offered as both HBA 325 and ARS 355.

    3 credits

    HBA 398 - Research Project in Anatomical Sciences

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project and be able to discuss his or her work. Open to juniors and seniors. May be repeated.

    2-4 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 399 - Research Project in Anatomical Sciences

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project and be able to discuss his or her work. Open to juniors and seniors. May be repeated.

    2-4 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 461 - Regional Human Anatomy

    An overview of the gross anatomy of the human body. Dissection of the entire human body. Includes neuroanatomy. Associated course fee - $88.00. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor for non-Health Sciences students.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor for non-Health Sciences students.5 credits

    HBA 521 - Gross Anatomy of Head, Neck, and Trunk

    Tutorial laboratories with emphasis on dissections of the human head, neck, and trunk.

    8 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 531 - The Body

    A lecture and laboratory with emphasis on dissection of the entire human body. Topics include functional and topographic anatomy, embryology, clinical correlations, and an introduction to radiology.

    8 credits, S/F graded

    HBA 540 - Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists

    A lecture and laboratory course that includes dissections of the entire human body. The course is organized in three modules: (1) thorax and abdomen, (2) head and neck, including neuroanatomy, and (3) limbs. It covers regional and conceptual information on the gross anatomy of all organ systems in the human body. Prerequisite: permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brooks Physical Therapy Program.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brooks Physical Therapy Program.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 541 - Evolutionary Anatomy

    A lecture and laboratory with emphasis on dissection of the entire human body. Includes functional and comparative anatomy with special emphasis on the musculoskeletal morphology of humans and higher primates. This course is offered as both DPA 541 and HBA 541.

    Fall, 8 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 542 - Advanced Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists

    Regional approach to the gross anatomy of the lower limb for physical therapy graduate students (DPT). The course is presented in conjunction with HYA519, Kinesiology for Physical Therapists. This module will offer an exopanded view of the functional anatomy and arthrology of the hip, thigh, leg and foot. Labs will be three hours, one day per week. Enrollment will be limited to DPT students.

    0 credit, S/U grading

    HBA 550 - Vertebrate Evolution

    Survey of the fossil record of vertebrate evolution. The course emphasizes the origin, phylogeny, comparative and functional morphology, biogeography, and paleontology of vertebrate animals. Laboratory included. The lectures and laboratories will utilize an extensive collection of comparative anatomical material, fossil casts, and slides.

    Spring, alternate years, 4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 551 - Phylogenetic Systematics, Biogeography and Comparative Methods

    This course will provide students with a familiarity in the practical application of modern phylogenetic methods and the use of phylogenies in framing evolutionary hypotheses. The course will have both a lecture and laboratory component with lectures including in-class discussions of assigned readings. Lab exercises will be devoted to hands-on experience with available software for phylogenetic and comparative methods. Comparative methods examined will include a focus on historical biogeography as well as ancestral state reconstruction, rates of evolution and diversification, and analysis of adaptation and key innovations.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 560 - Advanced Regional Anatomy

    Advanced human gross anatomy for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in biology, anthropology and other life sciences.

    Fall, Summer, 3-8 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 561 - Human Gross Anatomy

    A lecture and laboratory course that includes dissections of the entire human body. The course is organized in three modules: (1) thorax and abdomen, (2) head and neck, including neuronatomy, and (3) limbs. It covers regional and conceptual information on the gross anatomy of all organ systems in the human body. Prerequisite: permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brook's Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant or Respiratory Therapy programs.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brook's Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant or Respiratory Therapy programs.Summer, 5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 563 - Aspects of Animal Mechanics

    An introduction to biomechanics. Covers freebody mechanics and kinetics as applied to vertebrate locomotion. Considers the structure and physiology of muscle as it relates to adaptations of the musculoskeletal system. This course is offered as both HBA 563 and DPA 563.

    Spring, odd years, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 564 - Primate Evolution

    The taxonomic relationships and evolutionary history of primates as documented by their fossil record and structural and chemical evidence. Emphasis on primates prior to the origin of the human lineage. This course is offered as ANT 564, DPA 564 and HBA 564.

    Spring, even years, 4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 565 - Human Evolution

    A survey of the fossil record of hominid evolution through the Pliocene and Pleistocene with emphasis on the morphological structure and function of locomotor, masticatory, and neural systems. Includes utilization of comparative anatomical material and an extensive cast collection. This course is offered as ANT 565, DPA 565 and HBA 565.

    Fall, even years, 4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 566 - Studies in Functional Morphology

    Introduction to the theory and methods of functional morphology. Various methods of analysis and the application of experimental techniques such as electromyography or bone strain analysis are discussed as they pertain to the understanding of the interaction between form and function. Special emphasis is placed on the analysis of human and nonhuman primate morphology, and the application of this analysis to interpretation of the fossil evidence for human and nonhuman primate evolution. This course is offered as both HBA 566 and DPA 566.

    Spring, even years, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 582 - Comparative Anatomy of Primates

    The comparative anatomy of living primates. Laboratory dissection with emphasis on relating structural diversity to behavior and biomechanics. This course is offered as both HBA 582 and DPA 582.

    Spring, alternate years, 4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 590 - Projects in Anatomical Sciences

    Individual laboratory projects closely supervised by faculty members to be carried out in staff research laboratories.

    Fall and Spring, 1-6 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 690 - Graduate Seminar

    Seminars by graduate students on current literature in the areas of the anatomical sciences.

    Fall and Spring, 1 credit, S/U grading

    HBA 692 - Advanced Topics in Anatomical Sciences Literature

    Tutorial readings in anatomical sciences with periodic conferences, reports and examinations arranged with the instructor.

    Fall and Spring, 1-2 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 695 - Practicum in Teaching

    Practical instruction in the teaching of anatomical sciences carried out under faculty supervision.

    1-4 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 699 - Dissertation Research on Campus

    Original investigation under supervision of thesis adviser and committee.

    Fall, Spring, and Summer, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 700 - Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 701 - Dissertation Research off Campus - International

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBA 800 - Full-Time Summer Research

    Full-time laboratory research projects supervised by staff members.

    0 credit, S/U grading

    HBC 331 - Introductory Biochemistry

    An introduction to biochemistry including all aspects of metabolism and the synthesis, structure, and function of DNA, RNA, and protein stresses the medical significance of these aspects of biochemistry. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry

    Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry3 credits

    HBC 531 - Molecular Foundations of Medicine

    An integrated course covering the important aspects of biochemistry, cell biology, human and molecular genetics, and histology. Includes lectures, small group conferences and laboratories and stresses the clinical relevance of the basic science material.

    8 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 330 - Fundamentals of Pharmacology I

    HSC Bulletin InformationCovers the basic principles that underlie the action of drugs on physiological processes. These principles are applied to the specific action of drugs on the autonomic nervous system. In addition, the pharmacology of cardiovascular drugs are covered in detail.

    2 credits

    HBH 331 - Fundamentals of Pharmacology II

    A continuation of HBH 330. Covers the action of drugs on individual systems as well as drug-drug interactions emphasizing the mechanisms of drug action. Surveys therapeutic applications and adverse drug reactions.

    3 credits

    HBH 333 - Principles of Pharmacology

    This course presents the basic scientific principles that underlie the mechanism of action of the major classes of various drugs and their effects on patho-physiologic processes in humans. A prototype approach is used to assist students in organizing and learning the major drug classifications. A major emphasis is placed on the development of clinical decision-making and critical thinking skills as essential components of the role of the baccalaureate-prepared registered professional nurse.

    4 credits

    HBH 396 - Research Project in Pharmacology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project. May be repeated. May not be taken for credit in addition to BCP 487.

    0-6 credits

    HBH 398 - Research Project in Pharmacology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project. May be repeated. May not be taken for credit in addition to BCP 487.

    1-6 credits

    HBH 399 - Research Project in Pharmacology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project. May be repeated. May not be taken for credit in addition to BCP 487.

    1-6 credits

    HBH 501 - Principles of Pharmacology

    Basic principles and mechanism of drug distribution, absorption, metabolism and elimination. Principles of chemical carcinogenesis and tumor promotion. Autonomic, Smooth Muscle and CNS Pharmacology. Pharmacology of specific drugs of historical interest including alcohol, antibiotics, aspirin, nicotine and morphine. Review of anticoagulants & thrombolytic agents, antiparasitic, and drugs for the treatment of allergic conditions and gout. Includes discussion of specific cases taken from clinical practice and a presentation based on a set of selected readings. Crosslisted with BCP 401

    Fall, 4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 502 - Advanced Principles of Pharmacology

    Advanced concepts of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, biochemical and molecular mechanisms of drug action and drug resistance in human disease states. Toxicological agents and environmental pollutants. The pharmacology of autocoids, anti-inflammatories, immunosuppressants and anti-asthmatics. Rational drug design and drug receptor interactions using computer molecular modeling techniques. Includes discussion of specific cases taken from clinical practice and a presentation based on a set of selected readings. Cross-listed with BCP 402

    Spring, 4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 505 - Pharmacology to Pharmacy: Practical Clinical Aspects for Non-Clinicians (Didactic)

    This course, to be offered exclusively online, is designed for students interested in health care (either basic medical science-oriented or clinical). The class introduces many aspects of clinical pharmacology, but is geared toward non-clinicians. Clinical Vignettes and case discussions will be presented. Several medical procedures will be first described and then demonstrated. Understanding these procedures will be integral to appreciating the vignettes and clinical case discussions. The multidisciplinary course faculty will include physicians, scientists, educators, nurses and pharmacists. Enrolled students will have the opportunity to ask questions directly through online chats.

    0-3 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 506 - Graduate Pharmacology Colloquium

    Research seminars in pharmacology and toxicology presented by faculty and distinguished scientists from academic and industrial institutions. A 1 hr. Journal Club/Discussion Session precedes seminar to review a reference paper relevant to the research concepts to be presented. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the scientific principles given in the colloquium. Students are required to give a formal presentation. Co-scheduled with BCP 406. Offered

    Spring, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 510 - Practical Clinical Exposure for Translational Basic Scientists Hospital Clinical Rotations-Physician

    Course faculty will arrange two, two-week-long rotations (four weeks total). The following services are committed to participate: Anesthesiology-students will be offered opportunities in operating room (OR) observation; pre-admission patient evaluations; pain management clinic; and others depending upon availability. Internal Medicine-students will be offered opportunities in the medical intensive care unit (MICU); coronary care unit (CCU); medical oncology; and others depending upon availability. Others-depending upon availability. Student will be expected to spend 3-4 hours daily in their assigned clinical activates (15-20 hours weekly; 60-80 hours for the course). In addition, they will be asked to participate in special medical exercises arranged for them on an ad hoc basis by course faculty, both in the hospital pharmacy and elsewhere. Finally all students will attend weekly case conferences, 2hr each for all 4 weeks. At these conferences, students will be asked to prepare and present two clinical cases, based on two of the patients they have seen on their clinical rotations. It is expected that each student will be responsible for at least two presentations during the four-week course. Presentations will be graded by course faculty, S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). The final grade for the course, also S or U, will be determined both by these grades as well as by overall attendance at all course activities.

    0-3 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 531 - Principles of Medical Pharmacology

    Basic principles that underlie actions of drugs on physiological processes with particular reference to their therapeutic and toxic actions. For medical and dental students.

    5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 545 - Biochemical Laboratory Techniques

    Introduces theoretical principles and experimental techniques used in modern biochemical research. Lectures and homework assignments explore topics in basic molecular and cellular techniques. Prerequisites: Admission to Health Sciences Center program.

    Fall, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 546 - Biochemical Laboratory Techniques

    Continuation of HBH545. Lectures and demonstrations present topics in chromatography, mass spectrometry, protein sequencing, sedimentation, electrophoresis, ligand binding, basic pharmacological methods and statistical analysis of data. Includes procedures for the safe handling of toxic chemicals and radioisotopes. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, admission to graduate Health Sciences Center program.

    Spring, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 550 - Statistics in Life Sciences

    This course covers statistical concepts and issues in the life sciences. Basic algebra is assumed as a prerequisite. Topics covered include: descriptive statistics, foundation of statistical inference, sampling distribution, point estimate and confidence internal, comparison of independent and paired samples, analysis of categorical data, correlation, ANOVA, linear regression, and nonparametric test.

    1 credit, S/U grading

    HBH 560 - Proposal Preparation in Regulatory Biology

    A literature-based course focusing on major research areas in molecular and biochemical pharmacology. The first part of the course will expose students to a series of examples of recent grant proposals. The second part of the course will feature student presentations of their research proposals. Due to the coordination of this course with the Qualifying Exam, registration is limited to Pharmacology graduate students.

    Fall and Spring, 2 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 580 - Selected Topics in Pharmacology

    Student seminars and readings on topics arranged through consultation with staff.

    0-1 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 585 - Advanced Structural Biology/Structural Methods in Drug Discovery

    This course is designed for students that want to gain theoretical and practical experience in macromolecular structure determination through NMR spectroscopy and/or X-ray crystallography. The course is organized into two modules: NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Students may elect to take one or both modules. Emphasis will be placed on practical aspects of structural determination, including sample preparation, data collection and processing. In each of the modules, students will be guided through a complete structural determination project. A final project report per module will be required. Familiarity with Linux is desirable. Students are encouraged to contact instructors prior to enrolling. Crosslisted as BSB580 and HBH585.

    Spring, 0-4 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 590 - Pharmacology Seminars

    Advanced research seminars by staff and visiting lecturers.

    Fall and Spring, 0-1 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 599 - Graduate Research in Pharmacological Sciences

    Original research projects under faculty supervision.

    Fall, Spring, and Summer, 0-12 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 601 - Practicum in Teaching Pharmacology

    Practical experience and instruction in the teaching of pharmacology carried out under faculty orientation and supervision.

    Fall and Spring, 0-1 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 631 - Graduate Pharmacology I

    Basic principles of pharmacology will be discussed including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in both normal and various disease states. Major problems in human pharmacology will be considered including obesity, diabetes, hypertension and heart failure. Underlying physiology as well as pathophysiologic background will be presented. Drug design and development will be discussed from both scientific and socio-economic perspectives.

    Fall and Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 632 - Graduate Pharmacology II

    This course introduces second-year graduate students to chemotherapy agents used to combat bacterial and viral infections as well as cancers. The course develops a detailed understanding of the strategies involved in identifying drug targets in these two diverse therapeutic settings. The antibacterial lectures emphasize the problem of drug resistance and the need to develop new agents to combat resistant organisms. The anti-cancer lectures begin with a comprehensive analysis of the molecular basis of cellulartransformation leading to neoplastic disease. Lectures on cancer therapy emphasize the contrast between conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and novel therapeutic approaches guided by recent developments in cancer research. Novel computational biology and structural biology approaches are featured throughout the course. Each student is expected to make two formal journal-club style presentations during the course and to actively participate in group discussion.

    0-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 655 - Neuropharmacology

    An advanced course for graduate students interested in developing an understanding of neuropharmacology and research on this topic. Following a general introduction to the nerve cell structure, synaptic and chemical transmission, three themes receptors, receptors as channels, and G-protein-coupled receptors are developed. Recent advances in cell and molecular biology provide the framework for instruction and discussion. This course is offered as both HBH 655 and BNB 655. Prerequisiste: Admission to Graduate Health Sciences Center Program.

    Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 656 - Cell Biology

    Introduction to the structural and functional organization of cells and tissues and to the way structure relates to function. Particular emphasis is placed on nuclear and chromosomal structure, signal transduction, protein translocation, the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The interaction of cellular structures and components and their regulation is stressed as is the organization and interaction of cells in tissues. The course is comparative and includes examples of cells and tissues from vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and prokaryotic systems. Prerequisite: matriculation in graduate program or permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): matriculation in graduate program or permission of instructor.Spring, 3-4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBH 699 - Dissertation Research in Campus

    Original investigation undertaken as part of the Ph.D. program under supervision of thesis adviser and committee. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5); permission of thesis advisor. Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to candidacy (G5); permission of thesis advisor. Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab.Fall, Spring, and Summer, 0-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 700 - Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 701 - Dissertation Research off Campus - International

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBH 800 - Full-Time Summer Research

    Full-time laboratory research projects supervised by staff members. Summer Term. Prerequisites: Full-time pharmacology graduate status.

    0 credit, S/U grading

    HBI 398 - Research Projects in Biomedical Sciences

    An independent research project under faculty supervision. Emphasizes the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings and reporting of results. Project report required. May be repeated.

    2-4 credits

    HBI 599 - Graduate Research in Radiation Oncology Medical Physics

    Original research projects under the faculty supervision in areas of medical physics relating to radiation oncology.

    1-8 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 320 - General Microbiology

    A study of the molecular structure, functional anatomy, growth, genetics, and pathogenic mechanisms of microbial agents, with an emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Non-specific and specific host defenses and the control of microorganisms will also be covered. Not for credit in addition to BIO 315. Satisfies the microbiology requirement for admission to most allied health, nursing, optometry, and veterinary medicine professional schools.

    3 credits

    HBM 321 - General Microbiology Laboratory

    Complementing the lecture material of HBM 320, this optional laboratory covers basic and applied microbiological methods. Students are introduced to methods for isolating pure cultures, microscopy and staining, quantitation of bacteria and determination of sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. This laboratory is limited to pre-allied health, pre-nursing, and pre-veterinary students. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

    1 credit

    HBM 398 - Research Project in Microbiology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. Project report required. May be repeated.

    0-4 credits

    HBM 399 - Research Project in Microbiology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. Project report required. May be repeated.

    0-4 credits

    HBM 503 - Molecular Genetics

    Introduces the classical work and current developments in lower and higher genetic systems. Covers gene structure and regulation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, mutational analysis and mapping, transposable elements, and biological DNA transfer mechanisms. Bacteriophage as well as lower and higher eukaryotic systems are used to illustrate aspects of molecular genetic structure and function. This course is offered as both MCB 503 and HBM 503. Prerequisite: matriculation in graduate program or permission of instructor

    Prerequisite(s): matriculation in graduate program or permission of instructor Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 509 - Experimental Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

    An introduction to modern microbiological research. The selection of laboratories is made in consultation with the student's advisory committee. By taking part in ongoing projects the student will learn experimental procedures and techniques and become acquainted with research opportunities in the department.

    Fall, 1-8 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 510 - Experimental Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

    An introduction to modern microbiological research. The selection of laboratories is made in consultation with the student's advisory committee. By taking part in ongoing projects the student will learn experimental procedures and techniques and become acquainted with research opportunities in the department.

    Spring, 1-8 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 522 - Biology of Cancer

    A short course with the emphasis on cancer as a disease of man. Lectures address human cancer as seen by the clinician and as basic research relates to human disease. This course provides students with a link between courses in cell and molecular biology and the application of this basic information to tumor management. Offered as HBM 522 and HPH 659. Offered Spring

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 599 - Graduate Research in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

    Original investigations under faculty supervision.

    Fall and Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 640 - Molecular Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis

    This course covers the principles and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of a selected group of the best understood viral and bacterial pathogens. A major focus of the course relates to pathogen modification of host extracellular and intracellular signalling events, as well as pathogen-host interactions pertaining to the innate, humoral and cellular responses to infection. The material is presented by invited lecturers who are leaders in their fields. This courses is directed to graduate students, post-doctorate and medical fellows, and advanced medical students, who are are contemplating careers in infectious disease research. Prerequisite: HBM, BMO 503 and BMO 520

    Prerequisite(s): HBM, BMO 503 and BMO 5204 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 690 - Molecular Genetics and Microbiology Seminar

    A weekly meeting devoted to current work in the department. Enrolled students present seminars each week throughout the term.

    Fall and Spring, 0-1 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 691 - Readings in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology Literature

    Readings in microbiology literature covering areas of molecular biology and genetics.

    Fall, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 692 - Experimental Methods in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

    The goal of this course is to introduce students to the rationale underlying the wide array of new methods in biology, as well as to promote the critical analysis of scientific literature. Lectures will be given about various scientific methods and approaches, and journal articles relating to the concepts introduced will be assigned. A separate discussion section will be held to review and critique the articles, to be led by the students.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 693 - Reseach Proposal Preparation in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

    A course, based upon the literature in molecular genetics and microbiology, to instruct students in scientific writing and the preparation of research proposals. The course will be organized in three parts. In the first section of the course, students will become familiar with the components of the research proposal and will read and evaluate proposals written by the training faculty. Lectures given by the course co-directors will cover the basics of scientific writing, research proposal preparation and the problems and concerns commonly voiced by reviewers of research proposals. In the second section, students will develop two short proposals in the area of molecular genetics and microbiology that are unrealted to their graduate research. One of these short proposals will be selected for development into a full proposal. In the third section, students will develop and write the full proposal. The students' skills in proposal preparation will be enhnaced by critiquing the short and full proposals presented by other students in the second and third sections of the course.

    Spring, 1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBM 695 - Advanced Readings in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

    A seminar in changing topics in molecular genetics and microbiology such as virology, bacteriology, cancer biology, vaccines, drug discovery, mycology and parasitology.

    1 credit

    HBM 699 - Dissertation Research on Campus

    For the student who has been advanced to candidacy. Original research will be under the supervision of the thesis advisor and advisory committee.

    Fall, Spring, and Summer, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 700 - Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 701 - Dissertation Research off Campus - International

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBM 800 - Full-Time Summer Research

    Full-time laboratory research projects supervised by staff members.

    0-1 credits, S/U grading

    HBN 531 - Neuroscience

    HBP 310 - Pathology

    A study of the basic mechanisms of disease and the pathophysiology of the important human illnesses. Primarily for Health Sciences Center students; others admitted with special permission.

    3 credits

    HBP 393 - Special Topics from Pathology Literature

    Tutorial readings in pathology, with periodic conferences, reports, and examinations arranged with the instructor. May be repeated.

    1-2 credits

    HBP 394 - Special Topics from Pathology Literature

    Tutorial readings in pathology, with periodic conferences, reports, and examinations arranged with the instructor. May be repeated.

    1-2 credits

    HBP 398 - Research Project in Pathology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project and be able to discuss his or her work. May be repeated.

    0-4 credits

    HBP 399 - Research Project in Pathology

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project and be able to discuss his or her work. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Laboratory experience.

    Prerequisite(s): Laboratory experience.0-4 credits

    HBP 511 - Pathobiology for Graduate Health Care Practitioners

    For graduate students who have obtained primary health care baccalaureate degrees through the case study approach. Covers the underlying principles of modern experimental pathology. Focuses on the clinical aspects of the body system, including relevant underlying biochemistry, structure, or pathophysiology at the organ, tissue, cell or molecular level.

    Fall and Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 533 - Immunology

    Principles of immunology for graduate students in the biological sciences, including definition of antigens and antibodies, specificity of the immune response, immunoglobulin structure, the genetics of immunoglobulin synthesis, cellular cooperation in the immune response, hypersensitivity, tolerance immunogenetics. Open to advanced undergraduates.

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 556 - Laboratory Medicine

    A four-week full-time (6 hr, day) course dealing with clinical laboratory decision making and the basis for the laboratory evaluation of human evaluation of human disease. Didactic and practical presentations by interdepartmental faculty. Intended principally for senior medical students, but also for advanced microbiology or biochemistry students interested in clinical applications.

    Spring, 6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 590 - Seminars in Immunology

    A series of monthly seminars focusing on research in progress by the participants, current journal articles in the field of immunobiology, and prepared reviews of specified areas in the general field.

    Fall and Spring, 1 credit, S/U grading

    HBP 622 - Clinical Pathologic Correlations: Gross Pathology

    Correlative exercises in clinical pathology and human gross anatomic pathology including surgical biopsy material. Open to students in medical sciences.

    Fall, 1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 691 - Journal Club in Pathology

    Provides students with a forum for acquiring skills involved in the critical analysis and presentation of scientific data by active participation in seminars of major topics in cellular and molecular pathology, and critical discussion of selected topics with presentation of papers from the literature.

    Fall and Spring, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 966 - Hematology Conference

    Teaches a given aspect of hematology, oncology or immunology. Staff from medicine, pathology, and nuclear medicine participate, and usually presents a case to introduce the subject. Various teaching aids, such as review of pathological material, are used. Primarily for health sciences professionals.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 967 - Tumor Conference

    Considers problems in the management of patients with a malignancy and recommendations for a course of therapy for each patient including a review of a particular aspect of cancer treatment or natural history in depth. Functions as the link between the hospital and the Eastern Oncology Cooperative Group. Primarily for health science professionals.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 968 - Advanced Clinical Pathologic Correlations: Gross Pathology

    Postgraduate correlative exercises in human gross pathologic anatomy that emphasize the gross pathologic basis for altered function and clinical manifestations of disease. Open to physicians and others with advanced degrees in medical sciences.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 969 - Anatomical and Surgical Pathology for Residents in Pathology

    To provide practical and clinical experience in tissue pathology. During the four week elective the student is given the opportunity to participate in all aspects of autopsies as well as gross and microscopic examination of surgical specimens. There is ongoing review of general and organ system pathology to reinforce structural-functional correlations. This elective is selected by students who plan a career in pathology as a "hands-on" introduction to the specialty. The elective is also chosen by others, particularly individuals who will enter radiology, and who seek to correlate radiographic and pathologic anatomy. Students who are sufficiently interested and motivated may become involved in relatively independent work-up of selected cases. Primarily for health sciences professionals.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 971 - Renal Clinicopathologic Correlations

    A case-oriented, postgraduate course in renal biopsy interpretation and its relationship to patient management.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 350 - Physiology

    The normal functioning of human tissues and organs and their regulation by the nervous and endocrine systems. Special emphasis is given to physiological control systems and the preservation of the constancy of the internal environment. Lectures, conferences, demonstrations. Only for Health Sciences Center students.

    4 credits

    HBY 390 - Topics in Physiology

    Seminar in advanced topics taught in conjunction with HBY 350 Physiology. Only Fall.

    1 credit

    HBY 393 - Special Topics from Physiology and Biophysics Literature

    Tutorial readings in physiology and biophysics and periodic conferences, reports, and examinations arranged with the instructor. May be repeated. Only Fall.

    1-2 credits

    HBY 394 - Special Topics from Physiology and Biophysics Literature

    Tutorial readings in physiology and biophysics and periodic conferences, reports, and examinations arranged with the instructor. May be repeated. Only Fall.

    1-2 credits

    HBY 398 - Research Project in Physiology and Biophysics

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project and be able to discuss his or her work. May be repeated. Only Spring.

    0-6 credits

    HBY 399 - Research Project in Physiology and Biophysics

    An independent research project under faculty supervision, with emphasis on the principles of experimental design, data collection, evaluation of findings, and reporting of results. The student is expected to prepare a report on the project and be able to discuss his or her work. May be repeated. Only Spring.

    0-6 credits

    HBY 500 - Short Term Research Projects in Physiology and Biophysics

    Short term research project (rotation) under the supervision of a staff member.

    Spring, 1-12 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 501 - Physiology

    Introduces normal function of human tissues and organs and their regulation by nervous and endocrine systems. Emphasizes the organization and function of physiological control systems and the maintenance of a constant internal environment. Enrollment restricted to fully matriculated graduate students, with permission of instructor. Only Fall.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 530 - Cellular Physiology and Biophysics

    Cellular structure and function. Topics include ion channels, excitability, transport, energetics and metabolism, contraction, secretion, and communication within and between cells. Emphasizes quantitative analysis of cellular processes.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 531 - Medical Physiology

    A graduate-level introduction to the physiology of the organ systems with ultrastructural correlations. Ultrastructural correlations are demonstrated in a laboratory setting using histological preparations in conjunction with electron micrographs illustrating the relevant ultrastructure needed to understand the normal functioning of tissues and organs. The physiology of the major organ systems is addressed in a lecture format with the emphasis on problem solving. Relevant clinical correlations are addressed at the end of each block in so far as they illustrate how symptoms and signs of disease result from disordered physiology. Organ Systems addresses the structure and function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, skeletal, reproductive, and integumenary systems. Prerequisites: Admission to medical or dental school and permission of instructor. Only Spring.

    8 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 554 - Principles of Neuroscience

    The aim of this course is to highlight and create an understanding as to how the human nervous system operates.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 557 - Advanced Physiology

    This course is designed to introduce students to integrative approaches in biomedical research. Emphasis will be placed on the primary physiological concepts of control, communication, signal processsing, metabolism and replication. Prerequisites: Systems Physiology, Biochemistry and Permission of Instructor.

    Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 561 - Statistical Analysis of Physiological Data

    Statistical methods useful in analyzing common types of physiological data. Topics include probability, data distributions, hypothesis testing with parametric and non-parametric methods, ANOVA, regression and correlation, and power analysis. Emphasis is on experimental design and appropriate, efficient use of statistical software.

    Spring, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 562 - Model-based Analysis of Physiological Data

    The analysis of common biochemical and physiological data by non-linear regression of data models and biophysical models of physiological and biochemical processes. Examples include binding kinetics, compartmental mass transfer and spectral analysis.

    Fall, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 564 - Experimental Techniques in Systems Physiology

    A series of lectures and laboratory exercises designed to introduce students to in vivo experimental techniques used in systems physiology. Emphasis will be placed on the ethical use of rodents in biomedical research and the measurement of physiological variables. Data acquisition and analysis procedures used in cardiovascular, respiratory, neural, and renal physiology will also be covered. Only

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 570 - Student Journal Club

    Graduate student presentation on a selected topic with faculty consultation.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 590 - Special Topics in Physiology and Biophysics

    Students seminars on topics to be arranged through consultation with faculty members. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.Fall and Spring, 1 credit, S/U grading

    HBY 591 - Physiology and Biophysics Research

    Original investigation under the supervision of a staff member.

    1-12 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 690 - Seminar in Physiology and Biophysics

    Seminars and discussions on major topics in physiology and biophysics by students, staff, and visiting scientists. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor0-1 credits, S/U grading

    HBY 695 - Practicum in Teaching in Physiology and Biophysics

    Practical experience and instruction in the teaching of physiology and biophysics carried out under faculty orientation and supervision.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 699 - Dissertation Research on Campus

    Original (thesis) research undertaken with the supervision of a member of the staff. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5); permission of thesis advisor. Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to candidacy (G5); permission of thesis advisor. Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab.1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBY 700 - Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBY 701 - Dissertation Research off Campus - International

    Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed.1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HBY 800 - Full-Time Summer Research

    Full-time laboratory research projects supervised by staff members.

    0 credit, S/U grading

    HCB 501 - Compassionate Care, Medical Humanities, and the Illness Experience

    This course will introduce students to major interpretations of the illness experience, to several classical biographical and autobiographical accounts of illness, and to the important dynamic of compassionate care in the healing relationship. The patient-as-person will be emphasized throughout, as well as the ways in which respect for and empathy toward the patient impacts diagnostic accuracy, patient adherence, and patient and professional satisfaction. Some emotional dynamics of the illness experience will be addressed, such as hope, through the work of eminent physician-writers such as Jerome Groopman, MD. The dynamics of medical mistakes and forgiveness will be explored through psychiatrist Aaron Lazarre's influential writings on effective medical apologies. Some philosophical and metaphysical aspects of personhood and self-identity will be introduced.

    Offered in Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 502 - Landmark Cases in Bioethics

    What is a life worth living? How do we decide, and who decides, when to use medical technologies such as incubators, ventilators, transplants and reproductive technologies? This is an intensive introduction to some of the cases in medical ethics that have changed the ways that we are born, cared for, and die in American hospitals. Examples of topics include: vaccination and public health; eugenics and human subjects research ethics; the right of privacy and health care; end-of-life planning and treatment; women's bodies and fetal rights; disability rights; religious beliefs and health care; triage and allocation of scarce resources; mental illness and individual rights; global clinical trials; and, bioethics and culture.

    Offered in Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 503 - Traditions and Values in Bioethical Conflicts

    This course serves as an introduction to Western moral and religious traditions and to the positions about killing, saving, and enhancing that these traditions have informed. It explores the interface between religion and biomedical ethics and then delves into specific issues in health care in light of more general normative concerns such as justice, love, autonomy and rights, utilitarianism, self-sacrifice, gender, virtue, and community. The issues with which the course deals address the plights of real people, in the concrete, who come from particular backgrounds and whose set of values may make them sometimes recalcitrant to possibilities that technology has made (or is just now making) available.

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 504 - Special Topic in Biotechnology

    Just because we can do it, does this mean that we should do it? This course takes a focused look at controversial practices in health care settings, such as organ donation and enhancements, which have been (and are continuing to be) made available with the advancement of technology. Ought we to regard that which technology makes available as uncontroversially good? If not, why not? What sorts of new issues regarding distributive justice, autonomy, utility, and compassion are ours to consider carefully because of the changing world in which we live?

    Offered in Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 510 - Literature, Compassion, and Medical Care

    How does literature help us understand the nature of human illness and suffering? Can written works of art, ancient and contemporary, that depict moments of compassion and compassionate acts lay bare the moral, spiritual, psychological, and physical reality of suffering? There is a long association between literature and medicine, from the viewpoint of physician-writers, such as Anton Checkov and William Carlos Williams, whose literary skills have eclipsed their medical backgrounds. Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson were the creations of a physician-writer, Arthur Conan Doyle. Physicians portrayed in literature, such as Dr. Bernard Rieux, in Albert Camus The Plague, have also explored the relationship between patient and doctor, the nature of healing. This semester-long course will study these relationships through reading of poetry, drama, fiction, memoir, and essay and reflect on the nature of suffering, the intrinsic human need for compassion, and the implications for health and healing.

    Offered in Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 511 - Bioethics, Disability & Community

    Most people will experience disability at some point in their lives, and for some it will shape their social, personal, family, educational, and employment experiences. Viewpoints on disabilities which have emerged in policy and the broader culture have been explicitly challenged by emerging communities of people with disabilities who seek to speak for themselves and claim full inclusion in society. In this context, bioethicists and disability scholars have found points of both common cause and stark disagreement over issues such as neonatal and end-of-life care, the value and values inherent medical decisions and their outcomes. These bioethical debates occur in the context of debates over the rights of individuals with disabilities to self-determination, accommodations for work and schooling, and the potential for people with disabilities to make unique contributions because of--rather than despite--their disabilities. This course will consider major debates in bioethics in light of recent scholarship in disability studies, drawing on perspectives from philosophy, literature and narrative, history, and sociology.

    Offered in Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 512 - Altruism and Bioethics

    What is altruism, and what are its evolutionary roots as a moral dynamic? What impact does altruistic action have on the human agent? Does it impact flourishing and health? When is it experienced as overwhelming by medical professionals? Where does altruism fit within medical and nursing professionalism? How is it related to compassionate care? What about the duty to treat in time of epidemic, auto-experimentation, pro-bono medical treatment, high-risk provision of healthcare in time of conflict, healthcare activism, and the commitment to the patient's good as a guiding professional ideal? How does the practitioner strike a balance between the care of patients and the care of the nearest and dearest or the care of the self? How does altruism correlate with pro-social behavior, happiness, and health?

    Offered in Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 515 - Health Policy, History & Ethics

    Who gets sick? Who gets health care, what kind, and in what setting? This course covers the major health policy issues of the United States today, including the health status of the U.S. as a whole, the social and economic determinants of health, the role of personal and public health services in affecting health, the organization and financing of health services, and the multiple factors affecting health policies. We will explore the evolution of the US health care system in the past century, and debates about rights to health care or lack thereof, health disparities, conflicts of interest, and the ethics of health policy and practice.

    Offered in Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 516 - Ethical Issues in Human Reproduction

    New technologies have modified human reproduction in numerous ways, raising profound questions about the moral status of human life and the nature of parental and sibling obligations. This course will investigate the values that attach to different relationships, both familial and general. It will cover questions around the treatment of infertility, surrogate mothering, the commodification of the body, and the elevated expectations of familial obligations that correspond to new reproductive technologies.

    Offered in Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 519 - Public Health Law

    This course is a survey of legal and policy issues that have special relevance for public health professionals. Topics may vary, but typically will include many of the following: structure of the U.S. legal system; power of state and federal governments in matters affecting health care; governmental power and the right to privacy; constitutional issues in social welfare benefits; governmental regulation of health care providers and payers; the scope and discretion of administrative agencies in health care; the antitrust laws; the fraud and abuse laws; and negligence in the delivery and financing of health care. The course is taught primarily by Socratic method.

    Offered in Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 520 - Bioethics and Film

    Film and television, both fiction and nonfiction, capture man of the human tragedies, challenges, and possibilities that are debated in bioethics books, articles, newspapers, on hospital ethics committees, and in daily clinical care. This course will explore themes of birth, death, hope, fear, faith, finitude and resource allocation through watching, analyzing, and reading about bioethics issues in visual media. The course will draw on material from philosophical ethics to history, health policy, and film criticism to place these issues and their portrayals in context.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 521 - Clinical Ethics Practicum

    As difficult as settling abstract ethical issues in medicine may be, the delivery of ethical care presents its own set of difficulties. This course aims to introduce students to the practices hospitals employ to ensure the care they deliver meets the relevant legal and moral requirements. At the end of this course, students will have been exposed to many basic, and some advanced, aspects of clinical ethics theory and practice. They will be able to identify, describe, and analyze ethical dilemmas in clinical cases, and will develop an appreciation for the complexity and multi-disciplinary nature of ethical dilemmas in clinical medicine and will be able to apply what they have learned to assess ethical, social, and legal aspects of cases.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 523 - Special Topics in Medical Humanities

    As with all multidisciplinary pursuits, the medical humanities project is characterized by an ongoing negotiation among its practitioners over methods, scope and goals. This course will examine, in detail, one of the latest debates within the field.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 524 - Special Topics in Bioethics

    Bioethicists are frequently asked to consider the ethical ramifications of new research findings and emerging technologies as they arise. This course will examine one such issue in close detail.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 598 - Independent Study

    3 Credits, ABCF Grading

    0-4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HCB 599 - Special Projects Capstone Course

    This course, to be offered in the second (spring) semester, is designed to satisfy the special projects requirement of our program. The first part of the course will be devoted to readings and discussions that further illuminate the methodologies of the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities, compassionate care, and bioethics. Students will develop an appreciation for the standards of high quality scholarship and research through review of carefully selected readings. This will prepare them for the second part of the course, where they pursue and present their own research based on the existing literature. This capstone course will be highly collaborative, entail substantial peer review, and be organized around the development of significant student projects which are intended to represent the beginnings of publishable papers. Our entire faculty will be involved in these projects according to their specific areas of expertise.

    Offered in Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 500 - Survey of Nutrition Concepts

    This online course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition science. Dietary sources and functions of macro and micronutrients are reviewed, as well as the basics of their metabolism and their impact on disease prevention, energy balance and common health problems. Prerequisite: Prior Undergraduate or Graduate Physiology course. Department consent required

    Prerequisite(s): Prior Undergraduate or Graduate Physiology course. Department consent required3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 502 - Contemporary Issues in the Global Food System

    Every plate of food around the world tells a story. Is there sufficient nutrition? How far has the food traveled? Who can afford it? Will the food promote health or chronic disease? Which multi-national corporation delivered it? This online course explores why food matters and how our food choices impact the planet. We will travel around the world examining food security, hunger and malnutrition, food waste, agricultural practices, economic challenges and environmental concerns including climate change. Students will gain the ability to evaluate local and global food issues through case studies worldwide. Course materials will draw on published research and popular media. Assignments will be shaped by the student's academic and professional interests.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 503 - Nutrition in the Media: Making Sense of the Science

    This online course will increase students awareness of the pervasive nature of food and nutrition messaging and the varied motivations behind them. Basic concepts related to nutrition and food science will be presented along with the skills and resources needed to critically evaluate future issues and trends in nutrition. Topics to be discussed include popular supplements, fad diets, common chronic diseases and related dietary recommendations, sustainable food practices and food labeling.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 505 - Current Topics: Maternal and Child Nutrition

    This online course examines current trends in research on nutrition topics related to maternal and child health with a focus on evidence-based recommendations. Topics include fertility, intrauterine influences on development, maternal nutrition and infant feeding, breastfeeding, supplementation, asthma and allergic disease, nutrition and neurological development, gut microbiota in early life, links between early life and adult disease and environmental influences on early childhood feeding challenges. Prerequisite: HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval

    Prerequisite(s): HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 510 - Issues and Trends in Nutrition

    This online course will provide an overview of current and emerging issues in food and nutrition including topics that impact nutrition recommendations for patients. Course material will also include trends in health care organizations as it relates to food and nutrition service delivery. Students will explore how these trends may shape patient perceptions of favorable and unfavorable dietary choices, as well as food availability via market trends. Prerequisite: HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval

    Prerequisite(s): HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 512 - Macronutrients and Metabolic Regulation

    This online course is designed to promote an in depth understanding of the role of macronutrients in human health and nutrition. The digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fats and the relationship of energy metabolism will be extensively studied. Prerequisite:Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program or HFN 500

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program or HFN 5003 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 514 - Micronutrients and Functional Nutrition

    This online course is designed to promote an in depth understanding of the role of micronutrients in human health and nutrition. The digestion, absorption and metabolism of vitamins and minerals will be extensively studied. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program or HFN 500

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program or HFN 5003 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 515 - Advanced Nutrition in Clinical Practice I

    This online course will offer the student an opportunity to explore the role of diet and nutrition in the prevention, development and treatment of chronic disease ranging from nutritional deficiencies to autoimmune disease. Medical nutritional therapy for weight management, cardiovascular disease, bone health, oral and dental health, exercise, and potential drug and nutrient interactions are also included in the course topics. Prerequisite: HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval

    Prerequisite(s): HFN 500, or equivalent upon approval3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 516 - Advanced Nutrition in Clinical Practice II

    This online course will further explore medical nutrition therapy for gastrointestinal disorders, liver and pancreatic disease, metabolic disorders, psychiatric and behavioral disorders, pulmonary disease, renal dysfunction, cancer, metabolic stress, surgery and infection. The principles and practices of enteral and parenteral nutrition will be covered. Prerequisite: HFN 515

    Prerequisite(s): HFN 5153 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 520 - Advanced Communications and Counseling

    This online course examines the role of professionals in promoting general health and wellness for individuals and groups in a community setting. Application of key theoretical models of behavior change and evidence-based intervention strategies are explored. Strategies and skills in counseling the individual client and group are examined and applied. Additional topics include techniques for communicating nutrition information to the public, the media and ensuring cultural competence. In addition to the required text, a purchase of a self-assessment tool for $25 is necessary for the student to meet the course requirements. Pre requisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 525 - Food Policy and Health Outcomes in the United States

    This online course is an overview of how food access and health outcomes are influenced by federal and local municipal public policy. The class will include a brief overview of the American political system followed by a deeper analysis of some specific public policies that can lead to food access inequities and adverse health outcomes including, but not limited to: taxation, land use and zoning, agriculture policy, environmental policy, education policy, economic inequality, media influences and cultural biases. At the conclusion of the semester, students will be asked to conduct a case study analysis of a recent federal or local food policy decision and asked to evaluate the ways in which the policy succeeded or failed in achieving its mission. How should success and failure be measured? How could the policy be improved? What unintended consequences were discovered? Is the policy scalable to other municipalities?

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 530 - Nutrition Management and Leadership

    This online course is designed to develop effective management skills in clinical nutrition services. The emphasis will be on the management of clinical services in highly regulated health care settings. Case studies and problem-based learning scenarios will complement online instruction and readings. Personnel issues, cost containment, benchmarking and management principles pertinent to clinical functions will be discussed and applied to real life situations. Accreditation and regulation processes will be covered in depth and the focus will be on the Joint Commission Accreditation process and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Admission to Master of Science in Nutrition Program(HFNMZ)

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 570 - Statistics

    This online course facilitates the development of the knowledge base to support statistical reasoning and the skills necessary to conduct statistical analyses appropriate in a health care or public health environment. This includes data collection methods, data cleaning, hypothesis testing, confidence limits, and statistical analysis procedures, such as analysis of variance, simple linear regression, and multiple regression. Additional topics include techniques for summarizing results of various statistical procedures, as well as designing appropriate tables and graphs. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Nutrition Program3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 575 - Research Methods in Nutrition

    This online course will facilitate the students ability to work independently to develop a research project. This process will include the following: formulation of a research question or hypothesis, study design and design of data collection methods. Issues regarding the protection of human subjects and protected health information will be discussed. This course will prepare the student to successfully complete a culminating project at a later date required for completion of the Master's degree in Nutrition. Prerequisite: Admission to Maters in Nutrition Program (HFNMZ); Pre or Corequisite: HFN 570

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Maters in Nutrition Program (HFNMZ); Pre or Corequisite: HFN 5703 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 578 - Applications of Nutrition Research Literature

    This online course will facilitate development of the critical thinking skills necessary to become efficient consumers of nutrition-related research presented in the scientific literature and popular media. Students will learn to interpret current nutrition research by performing effective literature searches for nutrition research articles, recognizing the strengths and limitations of the research methods, and evaluating the quality of nutrition information in both the scientific literature and popular media. This course will begin with an overview of the challenges facing health professionals when delivering nutrition education to the layperson. Challenges to be discussed include media misrepresentation, health illiteracy and a Prerequisites: Admission to Masters in Nutrition Program (HFNMZ) and HFN 575

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 580 - Practical Applications

    Students enrolled in this online course will have the opportunity to choose between several types of culminating projects, including a research paper addressing a clinical question, a continuous quality improvement project addressing a clinical question or practice or an experiential practicum option. Students will work with a mentor who will supervise and guide the student as they select their project and topic and progress through the semester. Mentors will recommend a grade to the program coordinator after careful review of the finished project. Pre or Corequisite: HFN 578; Minimum completion of 27 HFN credits; Department consent required

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HFN 581 - Continuing Practical Applications

    This course provides an opportunity for students to successfully complete the requirements of HFN 580 when additional time is required. Prerequisite: HFN 580;Department consent required

    Prerequisite(s): HFN 580;Department consent required1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HM 910 - Continuation of Studies

    General Medicine review sessions for transfer and continuing students returning to School of Medicine studies.

    0-3 credits

    HM 999 - VISIT STUD ELECTIVE

    Students visiting from other medical schools to complete an elective at Univeristy Hospital

    0-12 credits, S/U grading

    HMC 331 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Care

    Introduction to ethics, its application to the health care profession, and to some of the major ethical and legal doctrines that affect health care professionals. The doctrines are discussed by addressing specific problem situations. Some of the topics are the right to refuse medical, mental, and social care; the right to life and its limits (e.g., suicide, euthanasia, abortion); the right to receive care; and access to and evaluation of health care delivery. Since the goal of the course is to sensitize professionals to legal and ethical issues like those they will be called upon to resolve, students are expected to take part in class discussions and do readings.

    3 credits

    HMC 361 - Literature and Medicine

    Explores major themes of medical care and illness as presented in works of poetry, prose, and drama. Includes personal and ethical dilemmas confronted by doctors; special characteristics and discourse of the medical setting; the experience of being ill; philosophical, social, and spritual dimensions of the clinical enounter; and the search for meanings in medical events.

    3 credits

    HMC 487 - Independent Study

    3 credits

    HMF 88 - Continuing Dietetic Internship Program

    This course is for continuing dietetic interns.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HMF 89 - Dietetic Internship Program

    The Dietetic Internship program emphasizes nutrition therapy and community nutrition. Dietetic interns routinely interact with physicians, medical residents, nurses and nurse practitioners at interdisciplinary case conferences, grand rounds, walking rounds and informal educational activities. This internship is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The program is limited to those students accepted into the program through the DICAS process.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HMH 401 - INTRO MEDICAL PHYS

    Introduction to Medical Physics

    3 credits

    HMO 401 - RESEARCH IN PERINATA

    HMO 402 - RSH PRJ IN OB/GYN

    HMO 490 - IND STUDY CYTOGENET

    HMO 492 - IND STUDY REP BIO

    HMP 425 - INDEP RES NEUROPSYCH

    HMP 430 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HMP 575 - Appl Clin Neuropsych

    HMP 598 - INDEP RES NEUROPSYCH

    HMP 599 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    HPD 519 - Sytematic Review of the Literature

    This introductory course will provide students with an understanding of the process used to perform systematic review, as well as provide a "hands on" experience. Each student will perform a systematic review of the literature for their own pre-defined research question of interest. As part of the systematic literature review process, students will learn how to focus their research question; to search the literature to identify relevant studies; to appraise the quality and select studies; and to summarize studies as well as to synthesize their results in context of their original research question raised. To receive a grade for this course, moreover, a scholarly product (e.g., manuscript or letter to the editor) must be submitted to a peer -reviewed journal.

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 521 - Introduction to Clinical Research

    This seminar series course provides a broad-based introduction to the fields of population health and clinical science research. This course will prepare participants to become critical consumers of the peer-reviewed literature. Class lectures will cover a wide range of topics, which include: framing a research question, formulating a research hypothesis, evaluating the peer-reviewed literature, exploring study design options, conducting human subjects' research ethically/responsibly, selecting clinical outcomes, and evaluating analytical alternatives. Offered in

    Summer, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 592 - Applied Data Management Using SAS

    This course provides students with an introduction to the principles of public health and clinical research-related informatics and data management using the SAS systems. Lectures and labs will be aimed at developing hands-on skills about how to create, maintain, and manage databases using the SAS Systems for Windows, a major software package used frequently in public health and clinical outcomes research.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 601 - Human Subjects: Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research

    This introductory course incorporates three components focused upon identifying: 1) the ethical principles associated with human subjects research; 2) the primary tenets of responsible conduct of research; 3) academic career planning. This course provides a philosophical basis for current research ethics practices, identifies outstanding ethical issues and controversies in clinical and translational science and research, and provides students with knowledge and access to resources such that they may to address the ethical challenges that may arise most effectively. The course provides a more in-depth exploration of the ethics and responsible conduct of clinical and translational science research that can supplement current mandated training in the area. Offered fall, one credit, ABCF grading

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 605 - Introductory Seminar on Doctoral Studies in Population Health and Clinical Outcomes

    This is an introductory doctoral level 3-credit seminar for all incoming PhD students in Population Health and Clinical Outcomes. This course will help students understand what earning a PhD entails, opportunities that exist after earning a PhD, typical PhD-level work activities, and beginning the process of academic writing. Students should already be thinking about what their dissertation will be about, and we will build off of that throughout the course.

    3 credits, S/U grading

    HPD 619 - Independent Study

    Intensive reading under supervision of one or more instructors, of material not covered in the formal curriculum, or execution of a research project under the supervision of one or more faculty members. Generally a written deliverable (e.g. manuscript) will be required. Instructor consent required.

    0-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 650 - Seminar Series: Clinical Applications of Molecular Medicine

    This course will provide an overview of the field of molecular medicine, with a focus on cutting edge technologies related to the current and future clinical applications to improve early detection, to enhance diagnostic testing, to monitor treatments, and to counsel patients on their prognosis. As applied to clinical patient care questions, the specific molecular medicine topics discussed will include: DNA, RNA, proteomics, and chromosome assays. Pending the specific lecturers and topics coordinated, students will be introduced to a broad range of biomarkers for disease such as cancer, pulmonary/heart diseases, autism, and immune-related disease challenges. An emphasis will be placed in this course on learning how molecular markers can be applied in a clinical setting to augment the patient and provider decision-making process. (NOTE: Students should have an introductory knowledge of cellular and molecular development biology, as well as a general laboratory background).

    Offered in Spring, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 664 - Clinical Trials

    This course introduces the design, conduct, and analysis of clinical trials. Topics include types of clinical trials, study design, treatment allocation, randomization and stratification, quality control, sample size requirements, patient consent, and interpretation of results.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 665 - Clinical Outcomes Research

    This course will provide an overview of the field of clinical outcomes assessment. The specific topics covered include: risk factors identification, clinical outcomes selection, risk adjustment methods, patient safety monitoring, and provider-based quality improvement performance reporting. Students will be introduced to a broad range of clinical outcomes including (but not limited to) short-term mortality, treatment-related morbidity, health-related quality of life, condition-specific metrics, patient satisfaction, health plan member satisfaction, utility theory, and cost-effectiveness analysis. An emphasis will be placed in this course is placed on learning how clinical outcomes research can provide a data-driven approach to influence patient, provider, program, and policy decisions.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 673 - Longitudinal Data Analysis

    This course covers the theory and application of univariate and multivariable techniques appropriate for longitudinal data. Students will be exposed to both theory and application addressing repeated measures challenges.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 674 - Statistical Methods in Clinical Outcomes and Health Services Research

    Clinical outcomes research frequently involves the analysis of nonexperimental retrospective databases. Such databases pose a number of statistical challenges, due to their nonexperimental design and various data limitations. This course will review and discuss multivariate methods in clinical outcomes research, focusing on specific issues involved in building and interpreting these models. These issues include causal inference, selection bias, measurement error, missing data problems, multicollinearity, and serial correlation. Clinical outcomes and health services research studies will be reviewed and discussed to illustrate these statistical issues and how they have been addressed in published research. Students will be asked to review and evaluate clinical outcomes and health services research papers, and present their reviews for discussion in class.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 681 - Advanced Social Determinants of Health

    This course will build on the prior HPH 523 and further examine the current evidence supporting an association between social determinants (e.g., socioeconomic status, physical living conditions, individual characteristics, social support, etc) and health. Students will review and critically examine the current literature on the social determinants of population health with the goal of identifying gaps in this literature which may be filled by future research. Concepts relating to the social determinants of health - e.g., identification of current priority areas, theoretical frameworks and perspectives, intervention, research methodology, etc, will be addressed as each comes up in the context of the reviewed journal article. Using publicly available data sets, students will choose a research topic related to an identified gap in the current research on the social determinants of health, propose a project to examine this topic or need which can be accomplished using publicly available data sets, conduct the analysis and write up their project in a format suitable for submission for publication. Offered

    Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 682 - Statistical Methods in Clinical Outcomes Research

    The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with some major topics in clinical outcomes research, the statistical models commonly employed, and statistical problems that need to be overcome. Specific topics of interest may include: risk factor analysis; static models; risk factor/disease progression analysis;dynamic models; survival analysis (including multivariable survival analysis); volume-outcomes research; and forecasting models. Statistical techniques and challenges will be discussed within the context of each research topic as they arise. By the end of this course, students should be broadly familiar with these issues, and should be able to evaluate published clinical outcomes research in terms of the appropriateness of models chosen and how well the statistical problems have been addresses, and the reliability of the results. Prerequisites: HPH 507 Biostatistics II or equivalent course. Offered

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 685 - Clinical Outcomes Research

    This course will introduce students to health services and clinical outcomes research methods and applications of these approaches. The course will begin with an overview of key statistical methods, outcomes measurement issues, and methods for assessing the economic value of clinical treatments. The second part of the course will consider specific applications of health services and clinical outcomes research from a review and critique of published studies. Students will present and critique these studies together with the instructor. Specific areas of applications will include: Estimating the Production of Health Hospital Volume and Clinical Outcomes Estimating Clinical Outcomes with Patient-Level Data Racial and Ethnic Disparities and Medical Treatments Electronic Medical Records and Clinical Outcomes Cost Effectiveness Applications

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 686 - Mentored Research Project in Population Health and Clinical Outcomes Research

    Supervised research experience.

    0-9 credits

    HPD 687 - Advanced Research Seminar

    The main purpose of this course is to familiarize students with empirical research methods via presentation and critiques of published research and work in progress. By presenting and discussing actual research that employs various statistical and other research methods, students will deepen their understanding of research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis. This will reinforce their understanding of these methods learned in previous coursework.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 692 - Practicum in Teaching I

    In this course, students will have the opportunity to examine, and plan for, the teaching component of the professor role. We will use a combination of strategies including lectures, discussions, small group activities, and interviews of exceptional teachers and departmental chairs to explore philosophical and practical issues related to course preparation, delivery, and evaluation. At the completion of the course, students will have a teaching portfolio that will have two basic components: a detailed set of plans for a specific course and a statement of their teaching philosophy. This will be an intensive hands on course that will require supportive and cooperative behaviors by all.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 693 - Practicum in Teaching II

    The course is a supervised teaching experience with the Master of Public Health program.

    Fall, Spring, and Summer, 3 credits, S/U grading

    HPD 694 - Grant Writing

    This course will assist students in synthesizing basic public health knowledge through completion of a grant writing experience. Students will be introduced to the process of writing grant proposals, developing budgets, professional networking, publishing in the scientific literature, and planning for their future careers as public health professionals and academics. Students will also present their own individual research projects, write their own grant proposal, and do a career mapping exercise.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HPD 699 - Dissertation Research On Campus

    This course is normally taken by advanced PhD students when they conduct research towards their theses. Only PhD students who have been advanced to candidacy (G5 status) can take this course. Students who have the G3 and G4 status and participate in a research project with their advisor can register for HPD 619 Independent Study.

    Summer, 0-9 credits, S/U grading

    MCR 501 - Experimental Clinical Research

    This course will (1) introduce trainees to formulation of a research question and hypothesis testing and; (2) introduce trainees to various research methodologies and how they are used to answer clinical research questions. This is not a clinical trials design course but rather is focused on how a clinical paradigm is used to formulate a research question and develop a hypothesis.

    Summer, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 506 - Biostatistics 1 for Clinical Scientists

    This is Part One of a two-part biostatistics training sequence. This course serves as an introduction to the principles and methodologies of biostatistics for clinical researchers. The material covered includes probability and distribution, descriptive statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, linear regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA, logistical regression, survival analysis, and non-parametric tests.

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 507 - Biostatistics II

    The second course in biostatistics in the clinical scientists training sequence is intended to further aquaint the traniees with the commonly used procedures covered in the first course and to learn to apply these procedures to real and simulated datasets using statistical software. As part of the course requirement, the trainees will need to complete a course project analyzing an appropriate research data set.

    Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 514 - Epidemiology for Clinical Scientists

    The aims of this course are to introduce trainees to basic epidemiologic concepts, methods and topics, and to provide them with skills to critically evaluate published literature, interpret data, and develop and evidence based approach to medical practice. Upon completion, trainees will be able to apply basic epidemiologic principles and methods to problems encountered in clinical medicine. Co-requisite: MCR 506 Offered

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 525 - Contemporary Topics in Clinical and Translational Research

    This monthly lunchtime seminar is designed to expose clinical and basic science students to contemporary topics in clinical and translational research. Topics include. "-Omics", Biobanking and Biorepositories, Biomedical Informatics, Imaging and Big Data. Lunch will be provided.

    1 credit, S/U grading

    MCR 549 - Legal and Regulatory Issues in Clinical Research

    Major contemporary legal and regulatory issues associated with scientific research will be discussed. Additionally, this course will introduce students to the history behind the regulations that safeguard human subjects, will educate students in detail about their responsibilities as clinical investigators.

    Summer, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 562 - Data Management and Informatics for Clinical Scientists

    This course provides students with computer and data management skills required to complete a research project. Questionnaire development, data processing and analysis, and issues surrounding data security are covered. Students will learn to use Excel, Access and Velos eResearch for data input and management, SPSS for data processing and analysis, and powerpoint and Word for presentations and report generation. Hands-on exercises are used to develop skills.

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 566 - Clinical Research Methods

    This course aims to introduce trainees to the different aspects of clinical trial design, conduct, management and analysis; and to provide trainees with a basic understanding of the key elements of clinical trial design and practice.. 2 credits, Fall term, Professor Leslie Hyman, PhD

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 567 - Research in Population Health and Clinical Outcomes Research

    This course provides an overview of research methods as applied to questions raised in the fields of population health and clinical science. It covers the topics of risk adjustment, cost assessment, access to, utilization and quality of care, outcomes and health status measurement, and health system performance.

    Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 580 - GCRC/SAC Scientific Review Process

    Students will understand and participate in the process of scientific review of human subject research protocols submitted to the GCRC.

    Fall, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 601 - Ethics and Professionalism in Clinical Research

    Using an interative case-based format, the topics covered include the justification of human research and reasonable balance of risk versus benefits; the use of animals in biomedical research; issues of informed consent and IRB paperwork processing; the ethical challenges of clinical research; ethical concerns associated with genetic testing and screening; research involving minors and adults of questionable capacity to consent; conflict of interest and funding of research for individuals and institutions; investigator responsibilities with regard to fulfilling government regulations; scientific fraud and whistle blowing; the scientific community and mentoring; authorship and attribution; special populations and inclusion of minorities and; mergency research-related special requirements.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 630 - Technology Transfer

    Students will be exposed to concepts including disclosing inventions, protecting intellectual property, working with industry/working with university faculty, licensing, collaborative agreements, intellectual property protection and management and commercialization.

    Spring, 0-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 650 - Molecular and Laboratory Methods in Clinical Research

    The aims of this course are to introduce trainees to laboratory methods relevant to clinical research with an emphasis on molecular medicine.

    Fall, 2-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 684 - Writing a Research Proposal

    This course will help students develop the skills necessary to design a research proposal including framing the specific aims, evaluation of the literature, description of preliminary data and research methods, proposed biostatistical analysis and power calculations, defining eligibility criteria, and development of a safety plan, issues of recruitment including under-represented ethnic and racial groups.

    Summer, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 692 - Research in Progress

    This course meets weekly and is attended by all trainees and mentors. Trainees present updates of their research endeavors and receive input from experienced mentors. Trainees are exposed to discussion among mentors on research design and interpretation.

    Fall and Spring, 1 credit, S/U grading

    MCR 693 - Clinical Research Opportunities at Stony Brook University and Affiliated Institutions

    The aims of this series are to familiarize trainees with the range and breadth of multidisciplinary clinical research carried out at Stony Brook and its affiliated institutions, and to provide examples of successful team approaches to study design, data analysis and ethical issues in clinical research. At each semester, a research team will be highlighted that will describe how the team came to be formed followed by a presentation about the research hypothesis, study design, data collection and analysis, and future work to follow.

    Fall, Spring, and Summer, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 694 - Seminars in Clinical Research

    Offered

    Fall and Spring, 1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MCR 695 - Defining and Developing a Career Path in Clinical and Transnational Research

    Students will read and discuss chapters from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute "Making the Right Moves" online textbook and develop a career plan. Topics include how to set up your lab, networking, conflicting resolution and managing your staff.

    1 credit, S/U grading

    MCR 696 - Presenting Research Results to Peer Audiences

    Students will have reading assignments on designing and giving a great talk as well as how to write a paper suitable for publication in a peer reviewed journal. Students will have an opportunity to practice giving a talk about their research projects. Masters students will present a summary of their thesis project to date. Each student in the Masters in Clinical Research Program will present a final project as part of the Annual Research Symposium help the last day of class.

    1 credit, S/U grading

    MCR 698 - Practicum in Teaching

    The course provides hands-on experience in classroom teaching and mentoring students in the conduct of clinical research. Other activities may include preparation and supervision of class projects, exams, homework assignments, creation of voice over PowerPoint lectures, and participation in interactive Blackboard student discussions. A final report that summarizes the activities completed and provides a self-reflection on the experiences gained during the practicum is requires at the conclusion of the course. Participation by advanced graduate student under the supervision of program faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the supervising faculty. 3 credits, S/U grading May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the supervising faculty. 3 credits, S/U grading May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.3 credits, S/U grading

    MCR 699 - Masters Thesis

    Original investigation in clinical research undertaken with the supervision of the student's Thesis Committee. 1-6 Credits, ABCF Grading

    1-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    MST 501 - Selected Topics in Translation/Research and Clinical Pathological Correlations

    The learning goals of this course are for the students to gain an appreciation of examples of research by physician scientists and its clinical application. A clinical case will be presented by faculty or senior students and this case will be discussed in the light of a recent biomedical research publication. The publications are presented, analyzed and discussed by the students as a group. Topics are selected from the recent biomedical literature and can involve any clinical discipline, basic life science research topics as well as bioengineering topics.

    0-1 credits, S/U grading

    MST 502 - Clinical Scientist Seminar Series

    The learning goals of this course are for the students to gain an appreciation of examples of research by physician scientists and its clinical application. A clinical case will be presented by faculty or senior students and this case will be discussed in the light of a recent biomedical research publication. The publications are presented, analyzed and discussed by the students as a group. Topics are selected from the recent biomedical literature and can involve any clinical discipline, basic life science research topics as well as bioengineering topics.

    0-1 credits, S/U grading
to top