Browsing: STEMM

People have become familiar with “bomb cyclones” this winter, as several powerful winter storms brought strong winds and heavy precipitation to the U.S. east coast, knocking out power and causing flooding. With strength that can rival that of hurricanes, bomb cyclones get their name from a process called bombogenesis, which describes the rapid intensification they undergo within 24 hours as they move along the coast. These winter storms tend to form and travel within narrow “atmospheric conveyor belts”, called storm tracks, which can change location over a period of years. Scientists have extensively studied potential causes behind these year-to-year changes…

Science or the Arts? With the latest degree program announced by the College of Arts and Sciences, students can now focus on both areas of study. The new Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Biology, recently approved by the NY State Department of Education, will be available for Fall 2018 registration in April. The BA in Biology will allow students to complete all the science/math requirements for medical school. It requires fewer science credits than the Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biology, instead requiring a minor in a non-overlapping, liberal arts program in the College of Arts and Sciences. The BS is…

HackHealth, a one-day, health-themed hackathon, was hosted by Stony Brook University’s Women in Computer Science (WiCS) on February 3. A diverse and beginner-friendly event, HackHealth provided a comfortable environment for participants to develop their ideas and skills. With multiple big-name sponsors such as Google, Facebook, Softheon and Netsmart, HackHealth promised to be an interesting event and it delivered. To start hackers off on the right foot, the day began with industry sponsors joining the students for breakfast, with the actual hacking starting at 11 am. WiCS President Kitty Liu first observed the 10 teams (with about 5 to 6 members…

Scientists believe that anatomical variation within and between species is the raw material for natural selection. However, the prevalence of convergent evolution, or the repeated evolution of highly similar yet complex forms among distantly related animals, suggests the presence of underlying general principles ( or“rules”) of evolution. Now Alan Turner, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, along with colleagues at the University and at Oklahoma State University are conducting research they believe will help to unlock the rules of evolution. Their research is funded by a newly awarded $579,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. Professor Turner leads the team, which will…

Each March during the federal appropriations season, thousands of organizations and advocacy groups from around the country flood the halls of Congress in Washington, D.C. to advocate for their legislative and funding priorities. Stony Brook University (SBU) is certainly no exception. From advocating for increased funding for both scientific research and higher education programs, to supporting a legislative solution for DACA students and quality health care for all, members of the SBU community are key advocates on the Hill. Snapshot of a Few Recent SBU Advocacy Efforts On March 12, Executive Committee members of the Graduate Student Organization (GSO), Karen…

What is “wetware” and what makes it more powerful than even the most advanced artificial intelligence? Adrienne Fairhall, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington, will reveal the secrets of wetware in her talk “The Computing Power of Wetware” at the 22nd Annual Swartz Foundation Mind Brain Lecture on Monday, April 2, in the Staller Center for the Arts. Our world is increasingly influenced by machine intelligence, as artificial neural networks become part of our daily lives. Powerful as they are, our brains and the nervous systems of even simple organisms, or “wetware,” perform at levels that…

As the scientific world mourns the passing of the man many consider a modern-day Einstein, Stony Brook University faculty remembered and reflected on the world-renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, who died peacefully at his home in Cambridge on March 14. Martin Roček, a Stony Brook professor of theoretical physics and a member of the C. N. Yang Institute, first met Hawking in the late 1970s, when he was a postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University. In 1979, Hawking hired Roček to teach him about the concept of supergravity, a significant extension of Einstein’s theory of relativity developed at Stony Brook by Roček’s colleague…

New York’s U.S. Congressman Lee Zeldin has received the National Sea Grant Award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Sea Grant Program for his continued support of this national coastal science association. New York Sea Grant Director and SBU Professor Bill Wise presented the award to him in Washington, DC, on March 7 along with SGA President Jim Hurley. New York Sea Grant is headquartered at Stony Brook University. New York Sea Grant (NYSG) is a statewide network of integrated research, education and extension services promoting coastal community economic vitality, environmental sustainability and citizen awareness about the state’s marine…

Humans are interacting more and more with technology as it advances through time. Thanks to research that attempts to formally represent a design space, individuals are able to understand the structure of computational interactions and find solutions using desirable properties. Computer Science Professor Xiaojun Bi is one of four co-editors and a co-author of the newly released book, Computational Interaction. This book provides a fresh perspective on the way humans and computers interact with one-another, along with presenting a new systematic engineering approach to the design of user interfaces. “It was really a pleasure to help write this book,” said Bi. “My hope…

An international research team including Krishna Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University, has performed the first genomic analysis of populations that lived on the former territory of the Roman Empire from around 500 AD. The analysis provides a direct look at the complex population movements during the era known as the European Migration Period. The palaeogenomic study, published in PNAS, investigated early human medieval genomic variation in southern Germany, with a specific investigation of the peculiar phenomenon of artificial skull formation, the origins of which scientists have debated for more than 50…

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