Browsing: STEMM

Freshman Kelvin Rodriguez participated in InnovateIT, hosted by Stony Brook University iCREATE March 2 through March 3. InnovateIT is a hackathon-style event that offers students the chance to take an idea and build something that makes a difference by designing solutions to real problems. Kelvin shares his personal experience with InnovateIT. InnovateIT, hosted by iCREATE, has changed my life. Now before I get deeper in this, let me introduce myself. My name is Kelvin Rodriguez, and I am a freshman here at Stony Brook University. I was first introduced to the Innovation Lab facility through my ITS 102 class, taught…

The Dynamic Genome Program: A Model for Bringing the Excitement of Authentic Research into Foundational Laboratory Courses Susan Wessler is Distinguished Professor of Genetics and the Neil and Rochelle Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education at the University of California Riverside. In 2011, she was elected Home Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences, the first woman to hold this position in the 150-year history of the Academy. She is a molecular geneticist known for her contributions to the field of transposon biology, specifically on the roles of plant transposable elements in gene and genome evolution. Wessler has contributed…

The Simons Center will host a lecture series by Kip Thorne, winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics along with Rainer Weiss and Barry C. Barish “for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves.” Kip Thorne is an American theoretical physicist known for his contributions in gravitational physics and astrophysics. He is one of the world’s leading experts on the astrophysical implications of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. He is the Feyman Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and continues to do scientific research and scientific consulting, most notably for the…

People have become familiar with “bomb cyclones” this winter, as several powerful winter storms brought strong winds and heavy precipitation to the U.S. east coast, knocking out power and causing flooding. With strength that can rival that of hurricanes, bomb cyclones get their name from a process called bombogenesis, which describes the rapid intensification they undergo within 24 hours as they move along the coast. These winter storms tend to form and travel within narrow “atmospheric conveyor belts”, called storm tracks, which can change location over a period of years. Scientists have extensively studied potential causes behind these year-to-year changes…

Science or the Arts? With the latest degree program announced by the College of Arts and Sciences, students can now focus on both areas of study. The new Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Biology, recently approved by the NY State Department of Education, will be available for Fall 2018 registration in April. The BA in Biology will allow students to complete all the science/math requirements for medical school. It requires fewer science credits than the Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biology, instead requiring a minor in a non-overlapping, liberal arts program in the College of Arts and Sciences. The BS is…

HackHealth, a one-day, health-themed hackathon, was hosted by Stony Brook University’s Women in Computer Science (WiCS) on February 3. A diverse and beginner-friendly event, HackHealth provided a comfortable environment for participants to develop their ideas and skills. With multiple big-name sponsors such as Google, Facebook, Softheon and Netsmart, HackHealth promised to be an interesting event and it delivered. To start hackers off on the right foot, the day began with industry sponsors joining the students for breakfast, with the actual hacking starting at 11 am. WiCS President Kitty Liu first observed the 10 teams (with about 5 to 6 members…

Scientists believe that anatomical variation within and between species is the raw material for natural selection. However, the prevalence of convergent evolution, or the repeated evolution of highly similar yet complex forms among distantly related animals, suggests the presence of underlying general principles ( or“rules”) of evolution. Now Alan Turner, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, along with colleagues at the University and at Oklahoma State University are conducting research they believe will help to unlock the rules of evolution. Their research is funded by a newly awarded $579,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. Professor Turner leads the team, which will…

Each March during the federal appropriations season, thousands of organizations and advocacy groups from around the country flood the halls of Congress in Washington, D.C. to advocate for their legislative and funding priorities. Stony Brook University (SBU) is certainly no exception. From advocating for increased funding for both scientific research and higher education programs, to supporting a legislative solution for DACA students and quality health care for all, members of the SBU community are key advocates on the Hill. Snapshot of a Few Recent SBU Advocacy Efforts On March 12, Executive Committee members of the Graduate Student Organization (GSO), Karen…

What is “wetware” and what makes it more powerful than even the most advanced artificial intelligence? Adrienne Fairhall, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington, will reveal the secrets of wetware in her talk “The Computing Power of Wetware” at the 22nd Annual Swartz Foundation Mind Brain Lecture on Monday, April 2, in the Staller Center for the Arts. Our world is increasingly influenced by machine intelligence, as artificial neural networks become part of our daily lives. Powerful as they are, our brains and the nervous systems of even simple organisms, or “wetware,” perform at levels that…

As the scientific world mourns the passing of the man many consider a modern-day Einstein, Stony Brook University faculty remembered and reflected on the world-renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, who died peacefully at his home in Cambridge on March 14. Martin Roček, a Stony Brook professor of theoretical physics and a member of the C. N. Yang Institute, first met Hawking in the late 1970s, when he was a postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University. In 1979, Hawking hired Roček to teach him about the concept of supergravity, a significant extension of Einstein’s theory of relativity developed at Stony Brook by Roček’s colleague…

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