Browsing: Research

Timothy Glotch, an associate professor in the Department of Geosciences at Stony Brook University whose research has been featured in the journals Science, Nature and more, was selected to receive the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program award for his research in identifying the mineral composition of planetary bodies using infrared spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft. The award, given to promising young faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholar through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of both education and research, comes with a supporting five-year grant for approximately $494,000. Glotch’s project, “Fundamental Measurements…

Balaji Sitharaman, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University, and a team of researchers developed a new, highly efficacious, potentially safer and more cost-effective nanoparticle-based MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agent for improved disease diagnosis and detection. The most recent findings are discussed in detail in his team’s research paper “Physicochemical characterization, and relaxometry studies of micro-graphite oxide, graphene nanoplatelets, and nanoribbons,” published in the June 7 edition of the journal PLoS ONE. The MRI, the technology for which was invented at Stony Brook University by Professor Paul Lauterbur, is one of the most…

Bluefin tuna exposed to radioactivity that leaked into the Pacific Ocean after Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi power plants were damaged by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011, carried that radioactivity to the waters off California, a new study by scientists from Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) and Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station has revealed. And while the radioactivity levels in the Pacific bluefin tuna posed no public health threat, these findings represent the first documented instance of the transport of radioactive materials in the sea through a biological migration. The study, “Pacific Bluefin Tuna…

Jon Longtin, an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stony Brook University and his team have been awarded a Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) 2012 R&D award from the United States Department of Energy for research entitled “Thermoelectric-Driven Sustainable Sensing and Actuation Systems for Fault-Tolerant Nuclear Incidents.” This award is part of America’s commitment to promote higher education in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The NEUP program is designed to foster university-based research for the country’s nuclear energy resources and to prepare students for work in nuclear engineering and nuclear science. Fellow team…

Gerald Smaldone, Professor and Chief, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the Stony Brook University School of Medicine and Rany Condos, Associate Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, NYU School of Medicine, along with colleagues from Stony Brook and NYU, announced an exclusive license agreement with Nostrum Pharmaceuticals for the development of aerosolized interferon gamma for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). IPF, a chronic and progressive form of lung disease caused by excessive formation of scar tissue in the lungs, affects approximately 200,000 Americans. With no effective treatment, the disease can lead to respiratory…

In a paper published in the May 20, 2012, edition of the journal Nature Physics, a research group from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University reports the development and demonstration of a novel probe for atomic quantum matter. The paper, “Probing an Ultracold-Atom Crystal with Matter Waves,” describes a proof-of-principle experiment on the diffraction of atomic de Broglie waves from a strongly correlated gas of atoms held in an optical lattice. “Our work extends matter-wave diffraction, a technique that has already proven useful in various scientific disciplines, to the realm of ultracold quantum matter. What we demonstrated…

Evidence of ancient water at a Martian crater is the latest in a long series of discoveries by a surprisingly long-lived Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, according to a paper published in the May 4 edition of the journal Science, “Ancient Impact and Aqueous Processes at Endeavour Crater, Mars.” The latest discovery was made at the rim of the Endeavour Crater, a large ancient impact crater on Mars measuring 14 miles in diameter. “The rover discovered evidence for low temperature liquid water and environments that would be conducive for life,” said Scott M. McLennan, professor of geochemistry at Stony Brook University…

The new home of the Louis and Beatrice Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology at Stony Brook University was officially dedicated at a celebratory event on May 7. Nearly 40 extended members of the Laufer family from across the United States joined Stony Brook officials, researcher faculty and local elected representatives for the commemorative ceremony. The Laufer Center, which is housed in a newly remodeled building (formerly the Stony Brook University Life Sciences Library), started operation in February of 2011 with a major philanthropic gift in loving memory of Louis and Beatrice Laufer by their children Henry and Marsha…

Perena Gouma, associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stony Brook University has invented and developed novel sensor nanotechnologies that instantly detect and monitor disease markers by simply exhaling into a handheld device, the Single Breath Disease diagnostics Breathalyzer. Her research is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Professor Gouma, who is also director of the Center for Nanomaterials and Sensor Development, and her research team, demonstrate how the new nanomedicine tool is designed to enable individuals to monitor signaling gas — such as acetone in exhaled breath — with their own inexpensive, non-invasive breath analyzer.…

Three penguin species that share the Western Antarctic Peninsula for breeding grounds have been affected in different ways by the higher temperatures brought on by global warming, according to Stony Brook University Ecology and Evolution Assistant Professor Heather Lynch and colleagues. The work by Lynch and her team is contained in three papers that have been published online in Polar Biology, Ecology and Marine Ecology Progress Series. Lynch and her colleagues used a combination of fieldwork and, increasingly, satellite imagery to track colonies of three penguin species – Adélie, chinstrap and gentoo. The Adélie and chinstrap migrate to the peninsula…

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