Browsing: Research

Understanding the complexities of high-impact science is tough. Communicating those complexities to policy-makers is even tougher. At Stony Brook, STRIDE (Science Training and Research to Inform Decisions) aims to meet that challenge by providing STEM graduate students with the interdisciplinary skills they need to communicate their findings and make positive change. Funded by a five-year, $3 million National Science Foundation grant and implemented by the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS), STRIDE prepares the next generation of scientists to translate complex data-enabled research into informed decisions and sound policies. Heather Lynch, associate professor of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook, was…

Experts have long known that as oil paintings age, soaps can form within the paint, degrading the appearance of the artworks. The process significantly complicates the preservation of oil painting, along with valuable cultural manifestations, which the paintings themselves help to preserve. “These soaps may form protrusions that grow within the paint and break up through the surface, creating a bumpy texture,” said Silvia Centeno, a member of the Department of Scientific Research at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met). “In other cases, the soaps can increase the transparency of the paint, or form a disfiguring, white…

Could baboons and other mammals worldwide soon need pedometers? Not likely, but a new study to be published in Science reveals that on average, mammals move distances two to three times shorter in human-modified landscapes than they do in the wild.  Researchers worldwide, including Catherine Markham in the Department of Anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, collected data on movement of 57 mammal species around the globe by using GPS tracking devices. To get the results, the research team – led by Dr. Marlee Tucker — compared the tracking data to a Human Footprint…

Forty finalists have been named in the Regeneron Science Talent Search, and among them are three students who were mentored by faculty at Stony Brook University. The Regeneron competition (formerly known as the Westinghouse Science Talent Search from 1942-1997 and the Intel Science Talent Search from 1998-2016) is the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science and math competition for high school seniors. It is designed to engage and inspire the next generation of scientific leaders. The finalists mentored at Stony Brook — Ella Feiner, Horace Mann School, Bronx, NY; Kavya Kopparapu, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology, Alexandria,…

A technique for detecting the presence of human beings in homes has been awarded $1 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). Led by Professor Ya Wang of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the project entails developing a Synchronized Low-Energy Electronically-Chopped Passive-InfraRed (PIR) Sensor for Occupancy Detection (SLEEPIR), an inventive occupancy sensing solution that could that optimize heating, cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) of buildings while reducing cost and slashing energy use. This non-mechanical oscillating technique, together with an advanced machine learning algorithm, is designed to address issues associated with high rates of false…

Diet is an important factor influencing the survival and evolution of all species. Many studies have shown that when species evolve from being a predator or insectivore to being a vegetarian, the rate at which new species arise increases. But a new study published in Ecology Letters reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more generations in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species. Co-author Liliana Dávalos, PhD, a Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution, and colleagues examined the rate at which new species arise, as well as the rate…

Abigail Bishop ’19, a junior in the Women in Science & Engineering (WISE) program, is becoming an expert on the life and death of stars. Abby probes the heavens under the mentorship of Michael Zingale, associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences. They create Type Ia supernovae simulations to investigate a form of stellar death used to measure distance astronomically. In her sophomore year, Abby participated in research under the supervision of Drs. Krishna Kumar and Seamus Riordan and co-presented a poster at the annual URECA (Undergraduate Research & Creative Activities) Celebration of Undergraduate Research event…

A special reception was held on January 8 for the three grand prize-winning students from Half Hollow Hills High School who won the prestigious 2017 Siemens Competition — the nation’s premier competition in math, science and technology for high school students. Arooba Ahmed, Jiachen Lee and Jillian Parker were honored by the Board of Education along with their mentor, Associate Professor Ken-Ichi Takemaru from Stony Brook University’s Department of Pharmacological Sciences. Also honored was Stony Brook University alum Michael Lake, who is Research Director for Half Hollow Hills School District. In December 2017, the SBU-mentored team was awarded a $100,000…

Suffolk County reportedly has recorded the most car accidents caused by sleepy drivers in the state; Stony Brook University researchers are on a mission to help turn that around. The School of Health Technology & Management (SHTM) was recently awarded a General Highway Safety Grant to conduct research to put together insights, methods of prevention and a program to combat drowsy driving among college students. The research project timeline runs from October of last year through September 2018 and will involve data collection on sleep habits and drowsy driving behaviors among Stony Brook commuter students, the development of a research-informed…

Fotis Sotiropoulos, Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, along with an interdisciplinary team from CEAS, represented Stony Brook University at the first Cheeloo Conference on Computational Medicine and Big Data in Jinan, China — a global US-China research partnership between the University and other partners, and the Jinan Supercomputer Center. The conference was organized by Professor Yuefan Deng from the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, together with colleagues from across CEAS. This international conference was designed to identify critical problems and propose leading solutions and time-wise milestones, leveraging the most advanced supercomputer methods to biomedical research, healthcare, and massive analysis on intensive data. The conference…

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