Browsing: Research

An editorial in the December 4 New York Times, Clams and Grass to the Rescue, discusses the progress being made by Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) in restoring the waters of Shinnecock Bay. SoMAS received $3 million in funds over five years to restock shellfish, expand existing eelgrass beds, harvest seaweeds to absorb nutrients and inhibit harmful algal blooms, monitor restoration efforts and share the project’s goals and results with stakeholders and the public. The environmental restoration project is funded in part by a philanthropic gift from the Laurie Landeau Foundation and matched by a gift…

Nine Stony Brook University scholars have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and will be honored for their contributions to science and engineering at the Fellows Forum held during the AAAS Annual Meeting on February 16, 2013, in Boston, Massachusetts. Stony Brook’s nine recipients are among 702 newly elected members who will receive a certificate and a blue and gold rosette pin as a symbol of their distinguished accomplishments. Among the new AAAS Fellows are Dennis N. Assanis, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs; Vitaly Citovsky, Professor, Department of Biochemistry and…

Eckard Wimmer, PhD, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Stony Brook University has been selected to receive the 2012 Robert Koch Gold Medal, a prestigious international scientific award by the Robert Koch Foundation under the patronage of the German Minister of Health. The award recognizes Wimmer’s lifetime achievements in infectious diseases, specifically his groundbreaking research on the poliovirus and as a pioneer in the new discipline of synthetic biology. The Robert Koch Gold Medal is one of Germany’s most prestigious awards given to scientists. Since 1960 medal awardees have included accomplished international scientists in biology,…

Stony Brook University unveiled its latest engineering feat, a 1.5 billion pixel Reality Deck, at a demonstration held at the University’s Center of Excellence in Wireless and Information Technology (CEWIT) on November 15. The Reality Deck, a 416 screen super-high resolution virtual reality four-walled surround-view theater, is the largest resolution immersive display ever built driven by a graphic supercomputer. Its purpose and primary design principle is to enable scientists, engineers and physicians to tackle modern-age problems that require the visualization of vast amounts of data. The Reality Deck, constructed with a $1.4 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant and a…

Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), one of the nation’s top research centers in the area of weather-related disasters and emergencies, will participate in a comprehensive review of New York State’s emergency preparedness and response capabilities commissioned by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. Governor Cuomo on Thursday announced the formation of three commissions charged with undertaking the review, as well as examining how to improve the strength and resilience of the state’s infrastructure to better withstand major weather incidents. The Governor’s action is in response to recent major storms to hit New York State, including Hurricanes Sandy and Irene, and…

Susan Larson, a professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Anatomical Sciences in the School of Medicine, wrote an article that appeared in the October 26 issue of Science, a journal published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “Did Australopiths Climb Trees?” discusses the lifestyle of Australopithecus afarensis, early members of the human lineage. Specifically, it addresses the debate over whether australopiths upper limbs enabled them to climb trees or not since their skeletons display a mix of humanlike and apelike characteristics. Some scientists “see their apelike upper-limbs as an indication that an ability to climb trees continued…

Two Stony Brook-sponsored conferences scheduled to take place this week have been postponed due to damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. Life Sciences Summit 2012, which was to have taken place October 29-30, has been postponed to a later date as yet to be determined.  No penalties will be assessed for canceling with less than 48 hours notice. Further information will appear when available on the conference website. Advanced Energy 2012, originally scheduled to take place October 29-30, has also been postponed to a date to be announced. Information will appear on the conference website when available.

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University have developed a high-resolution, 3D optical Doppler imaging tomography technique that captures the effects of cocaine restricting the blood supply in vessels – including small capillaries – of the brain. The study, reported in Molecular Psychiatry, and with images on the journal’s October 2012 cover, illustrates the first use of the novel neuroimaging technique and provides evidence of cocaine-induced cerebral microischemia, which can cause stroke. Stroke is one of the most serious medical risks of cocaine abuse. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is disrupted due to the vasoactive effects of…

Douglas Futuyma, PhD, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University, has been selected to receive the prestigious Joseph Leidy Award for Research Achievement presented by the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. The award, recognizing creative research and experimental tenacity in the natural sciences will be presented at the Bicentennial Symposium of the Academy of Natural Sciences held on October 11. Futuyma was chosen to receive this award for his body of research and his keen ability to communicate complex ideas to scientists, students and the general public. He is the author of…

An interdisciplinary team of Stony Brook University researchers has been selected to receive a three-year National Science Foundation (NSF) award for the development of a personalized asthma monitor that uses nanotechnology to detect known airway inflammation biomarkers in the breath. The project, “Personalized Asthma Monitor Detecting Nitric Oxide in Breath,” comes with a $599,763 award funded through August 31, 2015. The researchers, led by Perena Gouma, PhD, a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and director of the Center for Nanomaterials and Sensor Development at Stony Brook, and her research collaborators, Milutin Stanacevic, PhD, an associate professor in…

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