Browsing: Research

An international research team including Krishna Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University, has performed the first genomic analysis of populations that lived on the former territory of the Roman Empire from around 500 AD. The analysis provides a direct look at the complex population movements during the era known as the European Migration Period. The palaeogenomic study, published in PNAS, investigated early human medieval genomic variation in southern Germany, with a specific investigation of the peculiar phenomenon of artificial skull formation, the origins of which scientists have debated for more than 50…

Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professor Ya Wang has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for her project, Understanding Dynamics of Ultra-small Magnetic Nanoparticles in the Brain for Neuron Regeneration Therapies​. The award exclusively supports the research of junior faculty with federal grant funding. The research objective of Professor Wang’s CAREER project is to analyze biological phenomena to predict the neuron regeneration mechanisms. The established microvascular dynamic model, capable of quantifying the neuron regeneration process, is essential for moving closer to clinical success in treating fast-spreading neurodegenerative diseases. Professor Wang proposes that the…

There is widespread agreement that more young people to pursue careers in STEM, particularly women. Providing challenging and engaging opportunities outside the classroom during high school has a major impact on inspiring students to continue in STEM fields during college. The Garcia Research Scholar Program, part of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, is Stony Brook’s most prestigious pre-college program, with nearly 40 percent of participants continuing to medical school, and another 33 percent going on to graduate programs in STEM. The Garcia Research Scholar Program engages young students in polymer material research and helps guide them towards possible career…

Figuring out what is true in science when researchers are bombarded with information from many different studies is a challenge. A new paper, published in Nature, reveals that the power of meta-analysis in research synthesis over the past 40 years has transformed scientific thinking and research approaches. Meta-analysis has also become invaluable to making advances in many scientific fields, including medicine and ecology. Meta-analysis is the quantitative, scientific synthesis of research results from different studies investigating the same question. Since the approach (and the term) were first introduced in the 1970s, meta-analysis has been used to resolve seemingly contradictory research outcomes, to…

“I was intimidated by research, and I didn’t really know what was involved,” admits URECA scholar and undergraduate researcher Pamela Best ’19. “And yet, I wouldn’t have experienced it if I hadn’t tried it out,” she says. “Find a lab and a research area that really interests you. Don’t count yourself out.” Best, a junior in the University Scholars program and a double major in Biochemistry and Psychology, has explored multiple experiential opportunities while a student, including hands-on research via the URECA (Undergraduate Research & Creative Activities) summer program. Pamela’s URECA project investigates the use of acute intermittent hypoxia as a treatment…

For the past 40 years, the total number of Adélie Penguins, one of the most common on the Antarctic peninsula, has been steadily declining—or so biologists have thought. A new study led by Stony Brook University ecologist Heather Lynch and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, is providing new insights on this species of penguin. In a Scientific Reports paper, the international research team announced the discovery of a previously unknown “supercolony” of more than 1,500,000 Adélie Penguins in the Danger Islands, a chain of remote, rocky islands off of the Antarctic Peninsula’s northern tip. “Until recently, the Danger…

The National Science Foundation (NSF), one of the leading government research agencies in the American science realm, is once again demonstrating its support to computer science researchers in Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences through its Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER). Computer science professor Anshul Gandhi has been named the latest winner of an NSF CAREER Award for his project, “Enabling Predictable Performance in Cloud Computing.” Gandhi’s CAREER research takes aim at unpredictable performance in cloud environments. Cloud computing has quickly emerged as a key service for all users, offering benefits such as low cost, elasticity and pay-as-you-go options.…

STAT Madness is an annual competition that selects the nation’s best biomedical research taking place at universities and research institutions. This year Stony Brook University Professor Ken Dill and colleagues have been selected as finalists in the competition for their research published in PNAS about a computational model that may explain the origins of life. STAT Madness operates similar to the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament where winners move through the brackets before the finalists face off. Professor Dill’s research will be placed in a voting bracket of 64 at the start of the competition. Your voting determines a winner! Stony Brook…

The transformative career of Max Fink, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology Emeritus at Stony Brook University, a world-leading expert and defender of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), is the focus of a new collection at the Stony Brook University Libraries. The University recently announced the opening of the Max Fink Papers and Digital Collection. The digital collection, a subset of the papers, includes nearly 7,000 items (20,000 pages) of Dr. Fink’s original notes on experimental psychiatry, outgoing letters to colleagues, professional writings and an autobiographical memoir completed in 2017. The archive documents the extraordinary career of the psychiatrist and neurologist, who…

Jarrod French, an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology and Department of Chemistry at Stony Brook, has been named a Cottrell Scholar by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Cottrell Scholars are recognized for their innovative research plans and education programs. French was chosen for his research proposal, “Structural Dynamics of Photoactive Proteins and Crowdsourcing Structural Biology.” The award, given this year to 24 top early-career academic scientists, includes a $100,000 grant for each recipient. Cottrell Scholars engage in an annual networking event, providing them an opportunity to share insights and expertise through the Cottrell Scholar Collaborative. This year’s Cottrell Scholar…

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