Browsing: Research

Negative attitudes toward frozen vegetables may be impacting consumption of healthy foods, according to research by Stony Brook marketing professors. Consuming enough fruits and vegetables is important for maintaining a healthy diet and reducing risk factors for obesity and obesity-related illnesses. However, it’s not always pleasant to eat vegetables and it’s estimated that 87% of the population in the United States doesn’t eat enough vegetables. Identifying barriers to vegetable consumption is important because lower income heads of households report they avoid buying fresh vegetables because they are afraid they will expire before they are consumed. Frozen foods offer parents and…

On July 12, 2018, Stony Brook University is joining The Center for Science Teaching and Learning (CSTL) in presenting the Spellman High Voltage Electronic Clean Tech Competition. The event, open to the public, will take place in the Wang Center. As a highly rated “green” college, Stony Brook University is proud to host this international competition for a second year in a row. The campus invites everyone to join the event and meet these innovative students and see their projects. The world-wide, pre-college youth competition encourages participants to address real-world issues with a scientific understanding through research and design methods.…

Eight faculty from the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences  have received 10 prestigious Early Career Awards, gaining nearly $6 million in funding, during the 2017-2018 academic year. The awards include six National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awards, in addition to individual awards from the U.S Army Research Office (ARO), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), Department of Energy (DOE), and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). “It is encouraging to see leading national research funding agencies supporting many of Stony Brook’s young faculty with early career awards this academic year,” said Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, President of Stony Brook…

Karen Chen-Wiegart, an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering (MSCE) in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has been awarded the 2018 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award (NSF CAREER award) for her project, “A Multi-modal Study of Bi-continous Pattern Formation in Nano/Meso Composite and Porous Metals Films via Solid-State Interfacial Dealloying.” The NSF CAREER award is one of the most competitive and prestigious awards proving federal grants to support junior faculty with research and educational activities. She will receive $558K during the next five years to conduct her project. Chen-Wiegart’s CAREER research aims…

Stony Brook University seniors Anne McNulty and Rose Goldberg, are celebrating the publication of their book, Japanese Short Stories for Language Learners: Bilingual Stories in Japanese and English Tuttle Publishing (2018), with Eriko Sato, a professor of translation studies and Japanese at Stony Brook. The book provides authentic Japanese stories, their English translations, principles and theories of translation studies, artistic illustrations, and guides and resources for appreciating the stories in both English and Japanese. McNulty is majoring in Linguistics and minoring in Asian and Asian American Studies and Korean Studies. Goldberg is majoring in Studio Art and Asian and Asian…

Future astronauts spending long periods of time on the Moon could suffer bronchitis and other health problems by inhaling tiny particles of dust from its surface, according to new research. A new study from researchers at Stony Brook University finds simulated lunar soil is toxic to human lung and mouse brain cells. Up to 90 percent of human lung cells and mouse neurons died when exposed to dust particles that mimic soils found on the Moon’s surface. The results show breathing toxic dust, even in minute quantities, could pose a health hazard to future astronauts traveling to the Moon, Mars…

Manipulating the flow of energy through superconductors could radically transform technology, perhaps leading to applications such as ultra-fast, highly efficient quantum computers. But these subtle dynamics—including heat dispersion—play out with absurd speed across dizzying subatomic structures. Now, scientists have tracked never-before-seen interactions between electrons and the crystal lattice structure of copper-oxide superconductors. The collaboration, led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and including a Stony Brook grad student, achieved measurement precision faster than one trillionth of one second through a groundbreaking combination of experimental techniques. “We found a nuanced atomic landscape, where certain high-frequency,…

Romeil Sandhu, assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics (BMI) jointly administered by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine, has earned a 2018 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award. Sandhu received the $500,000 award for his project: Network Geometry for Analyzing Dynamical Systems. Professor Sandhu’s research is focused on how we study and develop reliable communication and social systems that are robust to potential attack. His work could help to make these systems better able to combat these types of intrusions and extends well beyond such systems to areas in cancer biology, finance, and…

Tom MacCarthy, Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to better understand how human antibodies are generated in response to infection by using computational biology. Part of a multi-PI $3 million grant, in collaboration with the lab of immunology pioneer Matthew D. Scharff, MD at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the research will employ computational models and analysis of high-throughput DNA sequence data. “Our approach is innovative because the computational models we are proposing will test molecular mechanisms both computationally and…

Building on a history of support to computer science researchers at Stony Brook University, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award to Professor Michalis Polychronakis, the Department of Computer Science has announced. Professor Polychronakis will receive a grant of $500,000 for his project: Principled and Practical Software Shielding against Advanced Exploits. The main objective of his proposed research is the design of innovative software hardening techniques, and their practical application to commodity software and systems. Polychronakis’ work is motivated by the fact that “the exploitation of vulnerabilities in popular software is among the leading causes…

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