Browsing: Research

The transformative career of Max Fink, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology Emeritus at Stony Brook University, a world-leading expert and defender of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), is the focus of a new collection at the Stony Brook University Libraries. The University recently announced the opening of the Max Fink Papers and Digital Collection. The digital collection, a subset of the papers, includes nearly 7,000 items (20,000 pages) of Dr. Fink’s original notes on experimental psychiatry, outgoing letters to colleagues, professional writings and an autobiographical memoir completed in 2017. The archive documents the extraordinary career of the psychiatrist and neurologist, who…

Jarrod French, an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology and Department of Chemistry at Stony Brook, has been named a Cottrell Scholar by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Cottrell Scholars are recognized for their innovative research plans and education programs. French was chosen for his research proposal, “Structural Dynamics of Photoactive Proteins and Crowdsourcing Structural Biology.” The award, given this year to 24 top early-career academic scientists, includes a $100,000 grant for each recipient. Cottrell Scholars engage in an annual networking event, providing them an opportunity to share insights and expertise through the Cottrell Scholar Collaborative. This year’s Cottrell Scholar…

When the Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center (AERTC), a New York State-designated Center of Excellence, was founded several years ago at Stony Brook University, its goal was to foster collaboration between the brightest minds in academia and industry leaders in energy. Its interdisciplinary research program and state-of-the-art laboratories have since kept the University at the leading edge of discovery, resulting in new technologies that impact residential and commercial energy use worldwide. Stony Brook recently took another step in its commitment to a future that protects the environment with efficient, sustainable energy management. The University announced on Friday, Feb. 16,…

“Get into lab as early as possible, regardless of whether you know you’ll like it or not, advises URECA Scholar Michael D’Agati ’18. “You never know where it can lead to and it makes the experience of school a lot more fun.” Michael, an Electrical Engineering major in the College of Engineering & Applied Sciences, and a University Scholars member, is a big advocate of research. He enjoys challenges, likes to ask questions, and has thrived in the research environment – he was named a Goldwater Scholar, a prestigious national honor, in his sophomore year. Michael’s substantive work in the Multi-Functional Nano-Biosystems Laboratory with his long-time mentor…

Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen usually affecting immunocompromised patients, particularly AIDS and organ transplant patients, and is one that can be lethal. Current treatments against cryptococcosis are often not effective. Now a team of researchers, led by Stony Brook University scientists Mansa Munshi and Maurizio Del Poeta in the School of Medicine’s Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology, have discovered a novel gene that helps understand the mechanism of survival of this pathogen in various host conditions. Their finding, published in Cell Reports, may help pave the way for more effective and innovative treatments against cryptococcosis. When C. neoformans survives in a host, disease results.…

Understanding the complexities of high-impact science is tough. Communicating those complexities to policy-makers is even tougher. At Stony Brook, STRIDE (Science Training and Research to Inform Decisions) aims to meet that challenge by providing STEM graduate students with the interdisciplinary skills they need to communicate their findings and make positive change. Funded by a five-year, $3 million National Science Foundation grant and implemented by the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS), STRIDE prepares the next generation of scientists to translate complex data-enabled research into informed decisions and sound policies. Heather Lynch, associate professor of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook, was…

Experts have long known that as oil paintings age, soaps can form within the paint, degrading the appearance of the artworks. The process significantly complicates the preservation of oil painting, along with valuable cultural manifestations, which the paintings themselves help to preserve. “These soaps may form protrusions that grow within the paint and break up through the surface, creating a bumpy texture,” said Silvia Centeno, a member of the Department of Scientific Research at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met). “In other cases, the soaps can increase the transparency of the paint, or form a disfiguring, white…

Could baboons and other mammals worldwide soon need pedometers? Not likely, but a new study to be published in Science reveals that on average, mammals move distances two to three times shorter in human-modified landscapes than they do in the wild.  Researchers worldwide, including Catherine Markham in the Department of Anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, collected data on movement of 57 mammal species around the globe by using GPS tracking devices. To get the results, the research team – led by Dr. Marlee Tucker — compared the tracking data to a Human Footprint…

Forty finalists have been named in the Regeneron Science Talent Search, and among them are three students who were mentored by faculty at Stony Brook University. The Regeneron competition (formerly known as the Westinghouse Science Talent Search from 1942-1997 and the Intel Science Talent Search from 1998-2016) is the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science and math competition for high school seniors. It is designed to engage and inspire the next generation of scientific leaders. The finalists mentored at Stony Brook — Ella Feiner, Horace Mann School, Bronx, NY; Kavya Kopparapu, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology, Alexandria,…

A technique for detecting the presence of human beings in homes has been awarded $1 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). Led by Professor Ya Wang of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the project entails developing a Synchronized Low-Energy Electronically-Chopped Passive-InfraRed (PIR) Sensor for Occupancy Detection (SLEEPIR), an inventive occupancy sensing solution that could that optimize heating, cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) of buildings while reducing cost and slashing energy use. This non-mechanical oscillating technique, together with an advanced machine learning algorithm, is designed to address issues associated with high rates of false…

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