Browsing: Research

Stony Brook’s Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center (AERTC) will play a key role in a nationwide research and development consortium for the offshore wind industry. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority was awarded a $18.5 million U.S. Department of Energy grant to establish the National Offshore Wind Research and Development Consortium, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced last week. New York State, through NYSERDA, has committed an additional $20.5 million to fund the consortium supporting Gov. Cuomo’s initiative Reforming the Energy Vision (REV). “As a major international research university, Stony Brook is deeply committed to applying the results of its…

Stony Brook University has received notification from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that two proposals directed by SBU faculty to expand or develop Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) designed to accelerate scientific breakthroughs needed to strengthen U.S. economic leadership and energy security will receive funding totaling $21.75 million. The two Stony Brook EFRCs are the Center for Mesoscale Transport Properties (m2M), led by renowned energy storage researcher, Esther Takeuchi, PhD, which will receive a four-year $12 million grant for the existing center; and the creation of a new EFRC, A Next Generation Synthesis Center (GENESIS) led by John Parise, PhD, which…

“It’s an amazing experience just to understand how the research process in academia works,” says English major Alexandra Rivera ’19. “[You] understand the process by looking into books that scholars have written, to find out what dissertations are being written, and to discuss with colleagues these materials in depth.” Rivera, a student in the combined BA/MA English Teacher preparation program, is majoring in English with a minor in Japanese Studies. She is working on an honors thesis, Literary Fraudulence in Allegory and Fanfiction through Dante’s Divine Comedy, under the direction of Douglas Pfeiffer and is a participant in the English Honors Program as well…

Opportunities to experience what scientists do were few and far between for Shruti Sharma while growing up in India. This lack of early exposure to hands-on science activities contributed to Sharma—now a fifth-year PhD candidate graduating this summer from the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University and a guest researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory—becoming involved in educational outreach. Since her undergraduate years, she has been mentoring K–12 and undergraduate students through various science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs. “When I was younger,…

For Stony Brook researcher Isaiah Nengo, paleontology is a lot like gambling. Many long days of field work in Kenya’s arid and barren Turkana Basin reveal very little. Most of the time, Nengo walks away empty-handed. But at night, he’s constantly thinking about what the next day might hold. He’s drawn back to the basin day after day in search of clues about the area’s ancient past. “We’re trying to reconstruct the ancient landscape — to bring it back to life. We want to know what the landscape looked like, what the vegetation was like, what animals lived there, what…

Keratin 17 (K17), a protein that promotes cancer, may prove to be a key target gene in the battle against pancreatic cancer. New research involving K17 as a therapeutic target against this lethal disease is being conducted by Kenneth Shroyer, MD, PhD, the Marvin Kuschner Professor and Chair of Pathology at Stony Brook Medicine, and Luisa Escobar-Hoyos, PhD, Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Pathology Translational Research Lab. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) awarded Drs. Shroyer and Escobar-Hoyas a $500,000 grant to carry out this research. This is the first time a PanCAN grant has been awarded to Stony Brook University. The…

Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Fan Ye is part of a team of researchers from across Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, School of Medicine, and School of Nursing that is studying new Internet-of-Things technologies to address the challenges of growing older and “aging in place.” The Internet of Things (IoT) is a vast universe of potentially controllable objects, such as smart lights and indoor climate controls, that can transform the environments in which we we live and work. Consistent monitoring of physical and mental conditions of older adults living independently is a key concern of families and…

Humans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher. Now, new fossil evidence shows that ancient primates – including one of the oldest known, Teilhardina brandti – had specialized grooming claws as well as nails. The findings, published online in the Journal of Human Evolution, overturn the prevailing assumption that the earliest primates had nails on all their digits and suggest the transition from claws to nails was more complex than previously thought. “Our results demonstrate that grooming claws were more widespread…

Sunlight is essential for all life, and living organisms have evolved to sense and respond to light. Dronpa is a protein “light switch” that can be turned on and off by light. A team of scientists led by Peter Tonge, a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Stony Brook University, has discovered a way to use infrared spectroscopy to determine for the first time structure changes that occur in dronpa during the transition from the dark (off) state to the light (on) state. The findings are reported in a paper published in Nature Chemistry. According to Tonge, the technique and the…

Preliminary results from a new study indicate that greater amounts of daily screen time are associated with more insomnia symptoms and shorter sleep duration among adolescents. Results show that for social messaging, web surfing and TV/movie watching, insomnia symptoms and sleep duration fully explained the association between screen-based activities and depressive symptoms. “Higher rates of depressive symptoms among teens may be partially explained through the ubiquitous use of screen-based activities, which can interfere with high quality restorative sleep.” said postdoctoral researcher Xian Stella Li,PhD, who conducted the analyses with Stony Brook professor and principal investigator Lauren Hale, and collaborators from…

1 2 3 57