Browsing: Provost’s Lecture

Rhonda Y. Williams, Professor of History, John L. Seigenthaler Chair in American History at Vanderbilt University, will discuss “The Things That Divide Us: Meditations” as part of the 2018 How Class Works Conference. Her talk will be held on Thursday, June 7, from 7 pm to 9 pm in the Students Activities Center, Ballroom B. There are so many “things” that divide us – that create tyrannical perimeters, borders, boundaries and walls; that order the way we look at each other and “other” others; that perpetuate hierarchies; and that all too often tragically legitimate and elaborate ignorance, misunderstanding, inequalities, violence,…

Metaphors in Our Lives: “I Love You for Yourself” Alexander Nehamas is Professor of Philosophy and Comparative Literature and the Carpenter Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He was born in Athens, Greece. His books include Nietzsche: Life as Literature, The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections from Plato to Foucault, Virtues of Authenticity: Essays on Plato and Socrates, Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art, and On Friendship. He has also translated Plato’s Symposium and Phaedrus into English. At Princeton, he has chaired the Council of the Humanities, the Program…

The Dynamic Genome Program: A Model for Bringing the Excitement of Authentic Research into Foundational Laboratory Courses Susan Wessler is Distinguished Professor of Genetics and the Neil and Rochelle Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education at the University of California Riverside. In 2011, she was elected Home Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences, the first woman to hold this position in the 150-year history of the Academy. She is a molecular geneticist known for her contributions to the field of transposon biology, specifically on the roles of plant transposable elements in gene and genome evolution. Wessler has contributed…

Weapons of Our Warfare: Martin Luther King, The Gospel of Publicity and Photojournalism Larry H. Spruill is a senior assistant professor of history at Morehouse College. His 1983 dissertation, “Southern Exposure, Photojournalism and the Civil Rights Movement,” remains a seminal work. During the past 35 years, three Pulitzer Prize-winning authors cited the study research. “Southern Exposure” is currently being rewritten as Weapons of Our Warfare. Dr. Spruill was co-founder and educational director of a special photographic preservation project co-sponsored by the New York State Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission and the New York State Museum. He initiated the Civil Rights Era Educational Database (CREED),…

What Darwin Didn’t Know Hopi Hoekstra is an internationally renowned biologist and the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology at Harvard University. She has made major strides in developing an approach that connects evolution in the wild to mechanisms at the molecular level. When Darwin articulated his theory of evolution by natural selection in 1859, he was missing a key piece: While he recognized that offspring resembled their parents, he didn’t know how this information was transmitted through generations. In the years since, not only has DNA been discovered as the carrier of genetic information, but we can link genes to the…

Featuring Eugene Alletto with SBU Alum Joe Campolo as Interviewer Eugene Alletto, Quarterback, Founder and CEO of Bedgear®, is the visionary behind the performance bedding category. With more than 20 years of experience in retail and manufacturing for the home furnishing industry and his ability to successfully analyze market trends, Alletto created Bedgear and led the company’s rapid growth. The QB title represents his philosophy on strategy and team success as part of the Bedgear culture. Bedgear’s success is attributed to its sleep system sales process that fits the pillow based on sleep profile and body type providing consumers with personalized sleep…

Stereotype Threat and Identity Threat: The Science of a Diverse Community Claude M. Steele is an American social psychologist and Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley. He is best known for his work on stereotype threat and its application to minority student academic performance. His earlier work dealt with research on the self (e.g., self-image, self-affirmation) as well as the role of self-regulation in addictive behaviors. In 2010, he released his book, Whistling Vivaldi and Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us, summarizing years of research on stereotype threat and the underperformance of minority students in higher education. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Board, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society. He has served…

November 1 Provost’s Lecture with Todd Gitlin Todd Gitlin is Professor of Journalism and Sociology and Chair of the PhD program in Communications at Columbia University. He is the author of 16 books, including The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage; The Whole World Is Watching: Mass Media in the Making and Unmaking of the New Left; and his latest Occupy Nation: The Roots, the Spirit, and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street. Widely published, his work has appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Dissent, The New Republic, and The Nation, among other publications. He holds degrees from Harvard University (mathematics), the University of…

Life’s Engines: How Microbes Made Earth Habitable Paul G. Falkowski is the Bennett L. Smith Chair and Director of the Environmental Biophysics and Molecular Ecology Program at Rutgers University. His scientific interests include evolution of the Earth systems, paleoecology, photosynthesis, biophysics, biogeochemical cycles and symbiosis. His research interests are focused on three areas: origins of life, how electron transfer reactions are mediated and how organisms transformed the geochemistry of Earth. In the evolution of Earth, microbes became a major force in transforming this planet to make it habitable for animals, including humans. Falkowski seeks to understand the basic chemical reactions that enabled…

The Rohlf Medal for Excellence in Morphometric Methods and Applications will be presented to Dennis E. Slice on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at the Provost’s Lecture Series, Charles B. Wang Center, Lecture Hall 1, 4 pm. In his presentation, “An Unexpected Journey: A Curious Career in Shape Analysis,” Dr. Slice will discuss the developments in shape analysis during his graduate career, the people who influenced him, and his post-graduate work in software and methodological developments and applications. Created in honor of F. James Rohlf, PhD, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Stony Brook University College of Arts and Sciences Department of…

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