Browsing: Happenings Spotlight

This category determines which posts are featured on the Happenings index page.

An international team of scientists including David Q. Matus, PhD, and Benjamin L. Martin, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Stony Brook University Cancer Center researchers,  have developed a new cell imaging technology combining lattice light sheet microscopy (LLSM) and adaptive optics (AO) to create high-resolution “movies” of cells in their 3D environment that also captures subcellular processes. Published in Science, the research reveals a technology that shows the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and in conditions such as mitosis, immune processes and in metastases. The AO-LLSM technique offers scientists investigating cancer and other…

Ryan Kawalerski,’19 has been awarded a prestigious 2018 Goldwater Scholarship, becoming one of only about 200 such scholars chosen nationwide out of more than 1,200 nominations. Kawalerski is a junior double majoring in Biochemistry, in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Applied Mathematics and Statistics, in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The Goldwater Scholarship recognizes promising research leaders in the fields of science, mathematics and engineering. The award includes a scholarship intended to help cover academic costs for the scholars based on merit and financial need. Nicole Soder ’19 also received an Honorable Mention in the competition. “This distinction means a great…

Stony Brook women’s lacrosse defeated a nationally-ranked opponent for the seventh time this season, topping No. 22 Johns Hopkins, 15-7, in front of a record crowd on Kylie Ohlmiller Bobblehead Night at LaValle Stadium on Friday. The official attendance for the contest was 3,123 – a new single-game program record. With the win, the No. 1 Seawolves improve to 13-0 (4-0 AE) so far in 2018. “This was a dangerous game,” said head coach Joe Spallina. “Johns Hopkins is a very good team. The crowd was buzzing tonight; it was an incredible atmosphere for a college lacrosse game.” Senior captain Kylie Ohlmiller led the way for…

Kelsea Johnson ‘17 arrived on NBC’s The Voice singing “Like I’m Gonna Lose You,” and “Don’t Let Go,” sending a message that she doesn’t plan on losing or letting go any time soon. Now the recent Stony Brook graduate is ready to sing live for the entire nation, representing “Team Alicia” when The Voice begins its live playoff round on Monday night, April 16, at 8:00 p.m. ET. Throughout her run on the show thus far, Johnson has enjoyed the support of her alma mater, retweeting and replying to messages on Twitter from the University (@stonybrooku), the College of Arts…

Stony Brook Medicine’s researchers and clinicians are leaders in their fields. They also are leading the way for students and junior faculty, by example and through teaching and mentorship. We asked six accomplished women to share their career journeys with us. Latha Chandran, MD, MPH When Dr. Chandran first began to attend meetings in her chosen profession of academic medicine, she sometimes was the only woman in the room – and even more frequently the only woman of color. Now, as Stony Brook University School of Medicine’s Vice Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs, she is a strong voice for…

Last week, the Stony Brook women’s lacrosse team clobbered Hartford 21-3, remaining one of only two undefeated teams in the NCAA. A total of 17 players scored in the game as redshirt senior Courtney Murphy broke the NCAA Division I record for career goals. It would have been a remarkable day for any team, but for these Seawolves, outstanding success has become the norm. For the first time in program history, Stony Brook women’s lacrosse is ranked No. 1 nationally in all three major polls — Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA), Cascade/Inside Lacrosse and Nike/US Lacrosse. Next on the team’s agenda…

One in five women and one in 71 men will be the victims of sexual assault at some point in their lives. The Center for Prevention and Outreach (CPO), in collaboration with other campus organizations, will be holding weekly events in order to discuss sexual assault for Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) this April. The National Coalition Against Sexual Assault first established SAAM in 2001 after initially observing only a week for sexual assault awareness. The movement to raise awareness about sexual assault and support for survivors began as early as the 1970s. Every Wednesday from 12 pm to 3…

Professor Robert Patro of the Department of Computer Science has received a 2018 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for his research proposal, A Comprehensive and Lightweight Framework for Transcriptome Analysis. In layman’s terms, this project focuses on the field of RNA (ribonucleic acid) research and how to analyze sequencing data pertaining to it. In addition to performing various other functions in the cell, RNA acts as a messenger molecule, carrying instructions from DNA and acting as a template for protein synthesis. “As a researcher at an institution focused on developing engineering-driven solutions in medical research, his proposed project supports not only the mission…

What is “wetware” and what makes it more powerful than even the most advanced artificial intelligence? Adrienne Fairhall, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington, will reveal the secrets of wetware in her talk “The Computing Power of Wetware” at the 22nd Annual Swartz Foundation Mind Brain Lecture on Monday, April 2, in the Staller Center for the Arts. Our world is increasingly influenced by machine intelligence, as artificial neural networks become part of our daily lives. Powerful as they are, our brains and the nervous systems of even simple organisms, or “wetware,” perform at levels that…

Humans are interacting more and more with technology as it advances through time. Thanks to research that attempts to formally represent a design space, individuals are able to understand the structure of computational interactions and find solutions using desirable properties. Computer Science Professor Xiaojun Bi is one of four co-editors and a co-author of the newly released book, Computational Interaction. This book provides a fresh perspective on the way humans and computers interact with one-another, along with presenting a new systematic engineering approach to the design of user interfaces. “It was really a pleasure to help write this book,” said Bi. “My hope…

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