Browsing: Faculty/Staff

The feet of primates function as grasping organs. But the adoption of bipedal locomotion – which reduces the ability to grasp – was a critical step in human evolution. In the first comprehensive study of the forefoot joints of ancient hominins, to be published online in PNAS, an international team of researchers conclude that adaptations for bipedal walking in primates occurred as early as 4.4 million years ago, and in that process early hominin feet may have retained some grasping ability. Co-author Carrie S. Mongle, a doctoral candidate in the Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, explained that by studying and comparing the toe…

Every Monday from July 9 through July 30, Professors Aruna and Niranjan Balasubramanian, from the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, held a machine learning workshop for children at Comsewogue Public Library. Each session lasted two hours and provided a fun learning experience for kids during their summer break. Guided by the professors, students learned about the inner workings of computer science through hands-on activities. They worked with software on computers that helped them understand Optical Character Recognition, digital creation and various other computer-related tools. They had the opportunity to ask and answer questions…

A research team led by Dominik Schneble, an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, has developed a novel method to explore spontaneous emission – when an atom or molecule transitions from an excited energy state to a lower energy state. Using a principle called wave-particle duality, the team constructed artificial emitters that spontaneously decay by emitting single atoms, rather than single photons. This method, published in Nature, uses ultracold matter waves and provides a novel experimental platform that may help scientists advance their understanding of open…

Faculty and doctoral students from the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University recently developed Mantis, a space-efficient system that uses new data structures to index large collections of raw sequencing data. Searching these sequencing archives for evidence of a particular sequence is, potentially, a very powerful capability. If, for example, a scientist discovers a new gene or variant they believe to be associated with some condition (e.g., a particular disease), they may want to query the entire archive to find which samples contain this gene or variant. Searching such immense public databases…

Computer Science Professor Klaus Mueller will serve as the next Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics(TVCG) — the preeminent publication in the field of visual computing. The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) is a global association of professionals working toward the development, implementation and maintenance of technology-centered products and services. As part of his three-year term, Mueller will also be a member of the Transactions Operations Committee and an ex officio, non-voting member of the Publications Board. “It is an honor to be named to this position. IEEE TVCG is a well-respected journal that I have long admired,” said Mueller. Mueller started…

Twenty-one Stony Brook University researchers attended SUNY DoD DC DAY, an exclusive and interactive networking event held in June that brought together nearly 90 outstanding researchers across eight SUNY campuses to meet with 25 senior leaders and program managers from the Department of Defense (DoD). Held at the Hilton Alexandria in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, the event kicked off with a welcome by SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson followed by a keynote address from Bindu Nair, Acting Director of the DOD Basic Research Office. During the late morning, researchers attended an Artificial Intelligence & Autonomous Systems roundtable and then participated in a full afternoon of speed networking…

Associate Professor of Computer Science Radu Sion, Director of Stony Brook University’s National Security Institute (NSI), met with members of Congress and their staff on July 17 to discuss the importance of federal funding for cybersecurity research in addition to the critical value that international researchers and students bring to the field of cybersecurity. Professor Sion met with Congressman Paul Tonko and Congressman Lee Zeldin as well as the Washington, DC staff of key members of the Senate Armed Services Committee, House Armed Services Committee and the House Committee on Homeland Security including Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Congressman Peter King, Congressman…

How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy and the Racial Divide, the latest book by Stony Brook University Associate Professor Crystal M. Fleming, has earned a starred Kirkus review, awarded to books of exceptional merit. The book will be released in September 2018 from Beacon Press and is available now for pre-order. Recipients of a Kirkus star are automatically eligible for the Kirkus Prize, a $50,000 award given to the winning books published and starred in the given year. According to Kirkus, “Fleming offers a crash course in what will be a radically new perspective…

Stony Brook University and Brentwood Union Free School District have received a competitive New York State Education grant of $225,000 from the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) for the Mathematics and Science Partnerships (MSP). This collaboration will engage teachers in real-world professional development opportunities. Project leader Rebecca Grella, a PhD graduate from the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook, has taught at Brentwood Union Free School District (the state’s largest suburban school district) for 17 years. Grella has created a research laboratory at Brentwood High School, which is referred to locally as “Little Stony Brook.” It is here that…

For the second year in a row, Xiaojun Bi has won a Google Research Award for his proposal to investigate gesture-based authentication for smartphones. Bi is assistant professor of Computer Science in the College of Engineering & Applied Sciences. Bi’s newly-funded Google research seeks to explore gesture typing, a widely adopted and popular text entry method for smartphone authentication. Authentication or “logging in” plays a vital role in keeping smartphone user information safe. Existing authentication schemes include using a PIN or a pattern locker to secure devices. Last year Professor Bi received a Google Research Award to to address user-interface design issues caused…

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