Browsing: Medicine and Research

Stony Brook Medicine’s researchers and clinicians are leaders in their fields. They also are leading the way for students and junior faculty, by example and through teaching and mentorship. We asked six accomplished women to share their career journeys with us. Latha Chandran, MD, MPH When Dr. Chandran first began to attend meetings in her chosen profession of academic medicine, she sometimes was the only woman in the room – and even more frequently the only woman of color. Now, as Stony Brook University School of Medicine’s Vice Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs, she is a strong voice for…

By combining data on pathology images of 13 types of cancer and correlating that with clinical and genomic data, a Stony Brook University-led team of researchers are able to identify tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), called TIL maps, which will enable cancer specialists to generate tumor-immune information from routinely gathered pathology slides. Published in Cell Reports, the paper details how TIL maps are related to the molecular characterization of tumors and patient survival. The method may provide a foundation on how to better diagnose and create a treatment plan for cancers that are responsive to immune-based anti-cancer therapy, such as melanoma, lung, bladder,…

People have become familiar with “bomb cyclones” this winter, as several powerful winter storms brought strong winds and heavy precipitation to the U.S. east coast, knocking out power and causing flooding. With strength that can rival that of hurricanes, bomb cyclones get their name from a process called bombogenesis, which describes the rapid intensification they undergo within 24 hours as they move along the coast. These winter storms tend to form and travel within narrow “atmospheric conveyor belts”, called storm tracks, which can change location over a period of years. Scientists have extensively studied potential causes behind these year-to-year changes…

A technology in development that uses electric fields to sweep dust from solar panels has promise as a new self-cleaning solar panel system designed to enhance energy efficiency and reduce costs. The technology was created in the laboratory of Alex Orlov, professor in the  Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and is being further developed by a Stony Brook research team named SolarClear. The team has received a $150,000 grant from PowerBridge NY to advance the technology, which uses tiny inexpensive electrodes to produce the electric fields. “We were inspired by NASA technology developed for Mars rovers…

Academic medicine creates breakthrough treatments and novel approaches to training the next generation of healthcare providers. At Stony Brook Medicine, our faculty are advancing the fight against kidney disease, addressing opioid use in pregnancy through a statewide task force, developing drugs for dangerous pathogens and pioneering treatments for catatonia. We are innovating medical education through our new three-year MD program, and highlighting the story of a Stony Brook University business graduate who became CEO of Harlem Hospital at age 37. In this issue of Medicine Today, you’ll also read about how we are making medical treatment less frightening for our…

Scientists believe that anatomical variation within and between species is the raw material for natural selection. However, the prevalence of convergent evolution, or the repeated evolution of highly similar yet complex forms among distantly related animals, suggests the presence of underlying general principles ( or“rules”) of evolution. Now Alan Turner, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, along with colleagues at the University and at Oklahoma State University are conducting research they believe will help to unlock the rules of evolution. Their research is funded by a newly awarded $579,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. Professor Turner leads the team, which will…

Stony Brook University School of Medicine has created a new medical training curriculum that enables students to complete their MD degree in three years instead of the traditional four years. The new MD program is the first of its kind on Long Island and only the second one in New York State. Medical schools nationwide are interested in developing optional three-year degree programs for two reasons — such programs would graduate MDs sooner and help fill the national physician shortage more quickly, and the shorter termed program would help reduce significant student debt from tuition costs. The Stony Brook program…

Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professor Ya Wang has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for her project, Understanding Dynamics of Ultra-small Magnetic Nanoparticles in the Brain for Neuron Regeneration Therapies​. The award exclusively supports the research of junior faculty with federal grant funding. The research objective of Professor Wang’s CAREER project is to analyze biological phenomena to predict the neuron regeneration mechanisms. The established microvascular dynamic model, capable of quantifying the neuron regeneration process, is essential for moving closer to clinical success in treating fast-spreading neurodegenerative diseases. Professor Wang proposes that the…

Alumni Spotlight: David Bernstein ’88 MD, FAASLD, FACG, FACP, FAGA  A Stony Brook SOM Alumni Board Initiative Highlighting Prominent Alumni to Enrich and Inspire Students Today. Presented by: Sowmya Sanapala, MD Candidate Class of 2018 It is with great pleasure and pride that the Stony Brook School of Medicine Alumni board student representatives introduce Dr. David Bernstein for this month’s “Alumni Spotlight” feature. Dr. Bernstein has had a remarkable career thus far with so much more in store. We hope that his words of wisdom will inspire you! Graduated from SUNY-Stony Brook School of Medicine in 1988 Residency at Montefiore…

STAT Madness is an annual competition that selects the nation’s best biomedical research taking place at universities and research institutions. This year Stony Brook University Professor Ken Dill and colleagues have been selected as finalists in the competition for their research published in PNAS about a computational model that may explain the origins of life. STAT Madness operates similar to the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament where winners move through the brackets before the finalists face off. Professor Dill’s research will be placed in a voting bracket of 64 at the start of the competition. Your voting determines a winner! Stony Brook…

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