Browsing: Medicine and Research

Manipulating the flow of energy through superconductors could radically transform technology, perhaps leading to applications such as ultra-fast, highly efficient quantum computers. But these subtle dynamics—including heat dispersion—play out with absurd speed across dizzying subatomic structures. Now, scientists have tracked never-before-seen interactions between electrons and the crystal lattice structure of copper-oxide superconductors. The collaboration, led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and including a Stony Brook grad student, achieved measurement precision faster than one trillionth of one second through a groundbreaking combination of experimental techniques. “We found a nuanced atomic landscape, where certain high-frequency,…

Romeil Sandhu, assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics (BMI) jointly administered by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine, has earned a 2018 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award. Sandhu received the $500,000 award for his project: Network Geometry for Analyzing Dynamical Systems. Professor Sandhu’s research is focused on how we study and develop reliable communication and social systems that are robust to potential attack. His work could help to make these systems better able to combat these types of intrusions and extends well beyond such systems to areas in cancer biology, finance, and…

Tom MacCarthy, Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to better understand how human antibodies are generated in response to infection by using computational biology. Part of a multi-PI $3 million grant, in collaboration with the lab of immunology pioneer Matthew D. Scharff, MD at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the research will employ computational models and analysis of high-throughput DNA sequence data. “Our approach is innovative because the computational models we are proposing will test molecular mechanisms both computationally and…

Building on a history of support to computer science researchers at Stony Brook University, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award to Professor Michalis Polychronakis, the Department of Computer Science has announced. Professor Polychronakis will receive a grant of $500,000 for his project: Principled and Practical Software Shielding against Advanced Exploits. The main objective of his proposed research is the design of innovative software hardening techniques, and their practical application to commodity software and systems. Polychronakis’ work is motivated by the fact that “the exploitation of vulnerabilities in popular software is among the leading causes…

Five million teeth are either injured or knocked-out per year according to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.  A safe, effective mouth guard should be part of standard equipment for athletes from an early age. In honor of National Facial Protection Month, Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine will be offering a 50% reduction on the fee for custom-made mouth guards in its Dental Care Center for both new and existing patients through May 31. “Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine’s Dental Care Center prides itself on making high-quality dental care accessible, and we are delighted to reduce…

If you have a dream you cherish, hang onto it and pursue it against all odds. That’s the philosophy that has kept Lou Ella Taylor motivated since she toured a hospital as a first-grader in Kansas. The local newspaper covered her visit and one of the photos in the feature shows Lou Ella wearing a nurse’s hat. The only student who asked to go on rounds with a doctor that day, Lou Ella remembered wanting to wear a doctor’s diagnostic head mirror. Today, in her mid-50s, Lou Ella is a registered nurse but is back at school, enrolled in a…

An international team of scientists including David Q. Matus, PhD, and Benjamin L. Martin, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Stony Brook University Cancer Center researchers, have developed a new cell imaging technology combining lattice light sheet microscopy (LLSM) and adaptive optics (AO) to create high-resolution “movies” of cells in their 3D environment that also captures subcellular processes. Published in Science, the research reveals a technology that shows the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and in conditions such as mitosis, immune processes and in metastases. The AO-LLSM technique offers scientists investigating…

A new technology employing endocannabinoids for pain relief, developed by Stony Brook University researchers affiliated with the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (ICB & DD), has been licensed to Artelo Biosciences, Inc. Endocannabinoids are natural marijuana-like substances in the body and have potential as the basis for new medicines. Artelo has an exclusive license with the Research Foundation for the State University of New York to the intellectual property portfolio of FABP inhibitors for the modulation of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of pain, inflammation and cancer. Fatty Acid Binding Proteins have been identified as intracellular transporters for the endocannabinoid…

The Microscopy Society of America (MSA) has selected Yimei Zhu — a Stony Brook University adjunct professor and a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) — to receive the 2018 Distinguished Scientist Award for physical sciences. This award annually recognizes two senior scientists, one in the physical sciences and the other in biological sciences, for their long-standing record of achievement in the field of microscopy and microanalysis. “I am extremely humbled by this recognition, the highest honor of the society, and to be selected among the most distinguished scientists in the field worldwide,” said Zhu,…

As a lifelong Long Islander with a love of the outdoors, David Knapp has seen more than enough to know that the face of tick-borne illness has changed since he was a child. “Growing up on Long Island,” said Knapp, the President of the Island Outreach Foundation, “we used to get bit by ticks all the time. You’d call your mom over, get a pair of tweezers, burn the tick and be done. In more recent times, you get bit by a tick, and it’s a much more serious concern. You’re instantly worried about Lyme disease, rickettsia, or something else,…

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