Browsing: Medicine and Research

An international team of scientists including David Q. Matus, PhD, and Benjamin L. Martin, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Stony Brook University Cancer Center researchers, have developed a new cell imaging technology combining lattice light sheet microscopy (LLSM) and adaptive optics (AO) to create high-resolution “movies” of cells in their 3D environment that also captures subcellular processes. Published in Science, the research reveals a technology that shows the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and in conditions such as mitosis, immune processes and in metastases. The AO-LLSM technique offers scientists investigating…

A new technology employing endocannabinoids for pain relief, developed by Stony Brook University researchers affiliated with the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (ICB & DD), has been licensed to Artelo Biosciences, Inc. Endocannabinoids are natural marijuana-like substances in the body and have potential as the basis for new medicines. Artelo has an exclusive license with the Research Foundation for the State University of New York to the intellectual property portfolio of FABP inhibitors for the modulation of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of pain, inflammation and cancer. Fatty Acid Binding Proteins have been identified as intracellular transporters for the endocannabinoid…

The Microscopy Society of America (MSA) has selected Yimei Zhu — a Stony Brook University adjunct professor and a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) — to receive the 2018 Distinguished Scientist Award for physical sciences. This award annually recognizes two senior scientists, one in the physical sciences and the other in biological sciences, for their long-standing record of achievement in the field of microscopy and microanalysis. “I am extremely humbled by this recognition, the highest honor of the society, and to be selected among the most distinguished scientists in the field worldwide,” said Zhu,…

As a lifelong Long Islander with a love of the outdoors, David Knapp has seen more than enough to know that the face of tick-borne illness has changed since he was a child. “Growing up on Long Island,” said Knapp, the President of the Island Outreach Foundation, “we used to get bit by ticks all the time. You’d call your mom over, get a pair of tweezers, burn the tick and be done. In more recent times, you get bit by a tick, and it’s a much more serious concern. You’re instantly worried about Lyme disease, rickettsia, or something else,…

Stony Brook Medicine’s researchers and clinicians are leaders in their fields. They also are leading the way for students and junior faculty, by example and through teaching and mentorship. We asked six accomplished women to share their career journeys with us. Latha Chandran, MD, MPH When Dr. Chandran first began to attend meetings in her chosen profession of academic medicine, she sometimes was the only woman in the room – and even more frequently the only woman of color. Now, as Stony Brook University School of Medicine’s Vice Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs, she is a strong voice for…

By combining data on pathology images of 13 types of cancer and correlating that with clinical and genomic data, a Stony Brook University-led team of researchers are able to identify tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), called TIL maps, which will enable cancer specialists to generate tumor-immune information from routinely gathered pathology slides. Published in Cell Reports, the paper details how TIL maps are related to the molecular characterization of tumors and patient survival. The method may provide a foundation on how to better diagnose and create a treatment plan for cancers that are responsive to immune-based anti-cancer therapy, such as melanoma, lung, bladder,…

People have become familiar with “bomb cyclones” this winter, as several powerful winter storms brought strong winds and heavy precipitation to the U.S. east coast, knocking out power and causing flooding. With strength that can rival that of hurricanes, bomb cyclones get their name from a process called bombogenesis, which describes the rapid intensification they undergo within 24 hours as they move along the coast. These winter storms tend to form and travel within narrow “atmospheric conveyor belts”, called storm tracks, which can change location over a period of years. Scientists have extensively studied potential causes behind these year-to-year changes…

A technology in development that uses electric fields to sweep dust from solar panels has promise as a new self-cleaning solar panel system designed to enhance energy efficiency and reduce costs. The technology was created in the laboratory of Alex Orlov, professor in the  Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and is being further developed by a Stony Brook research team named SolarClear. The team has received a $150,000 grant from PowerBridge NY to advance the technology, which uses tiny inexpensive electrodes to produce the electric fields. “We were inspired by NASA technology developed for Mars rovers…

Academic medicine creates breakthrough treatments and novel approaches to training the next generation of healthcare providers. At Stony Brook Medicine, our faculty are advancing the fight against kidney disease, addressing opioid use in pregnancy through a statewide task force, developing drugs for dangerous pathogens and pioneering treatments for catatonia. We are innovating medical education through our new three-year MD program, and highlighting the story of a Stony Brook University business graduate who became CEO of Harlem Hospital at age 37. In this issue of Medicine Today, you’ll also read about how we are making medical treatment less frightening for our…

Scientists believe that anatomical variation within and between species is the raw material for natural selection. However, the prevalence of convergent evolution, or the repeated evolution of highly similar yet complex forms among distantly related animals, suggests the presence of underlying general principles ( or“rules”) of evolution. Now Alan Turner, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, along with colleagues at the University and at Oklahoma State University are conducting research they believe will help to unlock the rules of evolution. Their research is funded by a newly awarded $579,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. Professor Turner leads the team, which will…

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