Browsing: Medicine and Research

Stony Brook University, iCell Gene Therapeutics and the University of Louisville have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for an Investigational New Drug (IND) for the treatment of relapsed and refractory T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. The approach is the first to use chimeric antigen receptor engineered T-cells directed against the target protein CD4 (CD4CAR). Together, Stony Brook University, the University of Louisville, and iCell Gene Therapeutics expect the first in-human Phase I clinical trial to begin accruing patients before the end of 2018. “We are excited to partner with the University of Louisville and iCell Gene Therapeutics to offer this…

Before she started her first corporate job, Anna Goldberg ’09, ’12 said she didn’t recall experiencing gender bias. All that changed when at age 24 she participated in a meeting with predominantly male co-workers and realized she wasn’t being taken seriously. “We were talking about a project that wasn’t working out and when I suggested a solution they just brushed it off. Then a man suggested the same thing and was told it was a good idea,” said Goldberg, who has a bachelor’s in chemical engineering and a master’s in chemistry, both from Stony Brook University. “Another time I proposed…

Sepsis occurs when chemicals released into the bloodstream to fight an infection trigger inflammatory responses throughout the body. It’s dangerous and often deadly. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 250,000 people die from sepsis each year, and it is a leading cause of hospitalization in the U.S. What if a simple test could identify the onset of sepsis as soon as it occurs? Better yet, what if wearable technology was available to alert doctors about sepsis in a patient before they ever show symptoms? This may be possible in the future thanks to Stony…

A research team led by Dominik Schneble, an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, has developed a novel method to explore spontaneous emission – when an atom or molecule transitions from an excited energy state to a lower energy state. Using a principle called wave-particle duality, the team constructed artificial emitters that spontaneously decay by emitting single atoms, rather than single photons. This method, published in Nature, uses ultracold matter waves and provides a novel experimental platform that may help scientists advance their understanding of open…

Faculty and doctoral students from the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University recently developed Mantis, a space-efficient system that uses new data structures to index large collections of raw sequencing data. Searching these sequencing archives for evidence of a particular sequence is, potentially, a very powerful capability. If, for example, a scientist discovers a new gene or variant they believe to be associated with some condition (e.g., a particular disease), they may want to query the entire archive to find which samples contain this gene or variant. Searching such immense public databases…

As millions of viewers watch the Discovery channel’s Shark Week 2018, two Stony Brook researchers are among a team that is determined to protect endangered shark species. A study published in Conservation Letters by lead author Diego Cardeñosa, a Stony Brook University PhD student, reveals that several threatened shark species are still common in the fin trade after being listed on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). “CITES‐listed Sharks Remain Among the Top Species in the Contemporary Fin Trade” is the first assessment of the species composition of the fin trade after…

SelectScience reports how researchers at Stony Brook University are working to fully understand the role of a ‘double-agent’ protein in breast cancer with a view to developing new treatments With breast cancer, the most common form of cancer in women globally, scientists at Stony Brook University, are on a mission to establish how the disease starts and progresses at the detailed molecular level. Dr. Chioma Okeoma, an associate professor in the School of Medicine, leads a research team dedicated to investigating how, in response to external attack, the host immune system can act as a double-edged sword—preventing viral infection, while…

Tremendous advancement of basic biological knowledge has come from genetically manipulating model organisms to test mechanistic hypotheses. But the selection of traditional model organisms available offers a limited view of biological diversity, meaning that they cannot be used to investigate a broad swath of novel and important processes. Now an international team of scientists including Jackie Collier, PhD, an Associate Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University, is investigating how to genetically manipulate a variety of marine protists –unicellular microscopic organisms that are not classified as a plant, animal or fungus – to develop…

Infertility treatments, such as in-vitro fertilization (IVF), are stressful experiences for women that can take large emotional tolls, especially when the treatment fails. At a time when extra support is needed, infertile women often report that family and friends urge them to “just relax” so they can conceive, causing women to feel as if their mental state is to blame for treatment failures. But a new study reveals evidence that women’s emotional state does not have a strong connection with the success of infertility treatment. Co-authored by Marci Lobel, PhD, Professor of Psychology and Jennifer Nicoloro SantaBarbara, MSW, MA,  and colleagues at…

The School of Social Welfare’s MSW and BSW programs have received reaccreditation from the Council on Social Work Education. “The reaccreditation process occurs every eight years, requiring the writing of a document which carefully assesses our processes and learning outcomes with students, our mission and goals, curriculum, admissions and student services, faculty, administration and resources, and diversity,” said Dean Jacqueline Mondros, D.S.W. The process also includes site visits and review by the Commission on Accreditation. According to Dean Mondros, a revamped MSW curriculum, with second year-specializations, will be in place next fall. “We think that the specializations will help graduates…

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