Browsing: Medicine and Research

With nearly 20 years of experience as a technology executive and entrepreneur that started with a computer science degree from Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Eddie Shek ’90 sees all too well the increasingly vital role that artificial intelligence (AI) already plays in modern life. “I think AI is a much bigger part of our world than most people realize,” said Shek, the Chief Strategy Officer at TrackX, a leading enterprise asset management company. “People talk and think about self-driving cars, for example, but every time you go on YouTube, AI is already part of everybody’s…

Preliminary results from a new study indicate that greater amounts of daily screen time are associated with more insomnia symptoms and shorter sleep duration among adolescents. Results show that for social messaging, web surfing and TV/movie watching, insomnia symptoms and sleep duration fully explained the association between screen-based activities and depressive symptoms. “Higher rates of depressive symptoms among teens may be partially explained through the ubiquitous use of screen-based activities, which can interfere with high quality restorative sleep.” said postdoctoral researcher Xian Stella Li,PhD, who conducted the analyses with Stony Brook professor and principal investigator Lauren Hale, and collaborators from…

Stony Brook University has been selected as one of eight prestigious institutions charged by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with accelerating solutions to health security threats. Through the federal program BARDA-DRIVe, the Center for Biotechnology will receive financial resources to support the incubation of businesses that can innovate in the detection and treatment of sepsis. Sepsis is among the most expensive conditions treated in US hospitals, as well as a leading cause of hospital readmission, according to HHS. “Stony Brook’s selection by the Department of Health & Human Services reflects our longstanding commitment to leadership and innovation in the fight against infectious…

If you want to understand how a material changes from one atomic-level configuration to another, it’s not enough to capture snapshots of before-and-after structures. It’d be better to track details of the transition as it happens. Same goes for studying catalysts, materials that speed up chemical reactions by bringing key ingredients together; the crucial action is often triggered by subtle atomic-scale shifts at intermediate stages. “To understand the structure of these transitional states, we need tools to both measure and identify what happens during the transition,” said Anatoly Frenkel, a physicist with a joint appointment at Stony Brook University and…

Through a $206,184 grant over three years from the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA), Stony Brook University and Stony Brook Medicine will undertake an innovative Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging research project that will bring new insights into the origins of Alzheimer’s disease. “Our partnership with the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America marks the beginning of a collaboration between our two institutions and it underscores our long-standing commitment to fostering scientific discovery and looking at ways new therapies can be developed,” said Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD. Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in…

There’s plenty of fish in the sea for human fisherman and bottlenose dolphins to feast on and now, according to a study by researchers at Stony Brook University published in Marine Mammal Science, both species are using a New York artificial reef at the same time to find fish to eat – a new finding. Using an underwater microphone deployed at 55 feet on an artificial reef three miles south of Atlantic Beach on Long Island, researchers were able to observe the sounds made by both species to determine eating habits and timing. Stony Brook graduate student in the School of Marine and…

Five new two-year coastal research projects are now underway and all are being administered at Stony Brook University. Two of the projects are being led by Christopher Gobler, Endowed Chair of Coastal Ecology and Conservation, and Associate Professor Bradley Peterson from the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook. The projects — funded with a total amount awarded of more than $1.1 million — are sponsored by New York Sea Grant (NYSG) and funded through the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Sea Grant’s federal parent agency. “These new projects target issues of importance to New Yorkers and to citizens everywhere,”…

Urothelial cancers of the bladder and upper urinary tract are among the most common cancers encountered worldwide. In the United States, urothelial cancers are among the most costly cancers to treat. With early diagnosis, followed by surgery, most urothelial cancers can be cured. Now an international team of cancer researchers including Kate Dickman, PhD, of the Department of Pharmacological Sciences and Medicine/Nephrology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine have developed a highly sensitive and specific non-invasive test as a biomarker for early detection of urothelial cancers. Details of this method known as UroSEEK, are published in eLife. UroSEEK identifies genetic errors…

A new study led by Ellen Kessel, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, suggests that high levels of stress associated with Hurricane Sandy may have left a lasting impact on children’s brain development. The research, “Hurricane Sandy Exposure Alters the Development of Neural Reactivity to Negative Stimuli in Children,” is published in the March/April 2018 issue of Child Development. Stony Brook faculty that collaborated on the study with Kessel include Clinical Psychology Professors Daniel Klein and Brady Nelson and Psychiatry Professors Roman Kotov, Evelyn Bromet and Gabrielle Carlson, along with Greg Hajcak from Florida State University and…

Benjamin Martin, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, has received the Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research for his work with circulating tumor cells. The award, granted to promising early career New York City-area cancer research scientists, includes a three-year $600,000 grant, effective July 1. Professor Martin and colleague David Q. Matus, PhD, are using state-of-the-art microscopy and genetic analysis of circulating tumor cells to achieve an unprecedented level of understanding about how these cells exit blood vessels and invade news sites on the body. To help accelerate breakthroughs in cancer research, the…

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