Browsing: Medicine Today

Infertility treatments, such as in-vitro fertilization (IVF), are stressful experiences for women that can take large emotional tolls, especially when the treatment fails. At a time when extra support is needed, infertile women often report that family and friends urge them to “just relax” so they can conceive, causing women to feel as if their mental state is to blame for treatment failures. But a new study reveals evidence that women’s emotional state does not have a strong connection with the success of infertility treatment. Co-authored by Marci Lobel, PhD, Professor of Psychology and Jennifer Nicoloro SantaBarbara, MSW, MA,  and colleagues at…

As a major biomedical research institution, Stony Brook Medicine is constantly exploring new technologies that allow a better understanding of the causes of, and potential cures for, human disease. In this issue of Medicine Today, we report on an international team including Stony Brook researchers who have developed a new cell imaging technology that offers new insights into how cells operate and adapt to different physiological environments. The pioneering technique will benefit scientists who are investigating cancer and other diseases. We also report on another team of researchers who are using deep learning techniques (artificial intelligence) to decipher recurring patterns…

The School of Medicine Alumni Board would like to proudly announce the new School of Medicine Alumni Board President, Lisa Vignogna-Barlas, MD ‘96.  Dear Fellow Alumni, You’ll see by the stories included in this edition of Medicine Today that Stony Brook Medicine is forging exciting new research, fostering active community involvement and gathering support for our medical students by promoting our Stethoscope Drive. It is my goal to further outreach to our alumni by initiating programs that bring them closer to the School of Medicine, closer to the students and, equally important, closer to each other. In addition to the Stethoscope…

Stony Brook University School of Medicine student Jenny Kim is considering becoming an anesthesiologist and would like to research novel non-opioid analgesics for pain. During the 2018-19 academic year, Kim will be involved in pain research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) before she returns to Stony Brook the following year to complete her MD program. This opportunity arose as Kim was selected as one of the recipients of the NIH’s 2018-19 Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP). Kim is among 37 students selected nationwide for the fellowship. The research training program enables students to pause their university studies for…

With the arrival of the Class of 2022 in August, comes the fifth year of what is fast becoming one of the School of Medicine’s proudest traditions: the Alumni – Stethoscope Drive. Thanks to the leadership of the School of Medicine Alumni Board and the generosity of School of Medicine alumni, incoming students will receive a surprise at their White Coat Ceremony in August : 3M Littmann Cardiology IV™ Stethoscope. These gifts not only lighten the financial burden for medical students at Stony Brook, but also serve as a tangible reminder that the alumni community is behind them in their journeys…

June 30 marks the conclusion of the $600 million Campaign for Stony Brook, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in SUNY history. Funds raised by The Campaign for Stony Brook have been used to support powerful new initiatives across the University, including the construction of the Medical and Research Translation Building (MART) and the new Stony Brook Children’s Hospital Building, the creation of the Thomas Hartman Center for Parkinson’s Research and the Island Federal Credit Union Business Lab, and endowed chairs and professorships in trauma surgery, coastal ecology and conservation, pediatrics and studio art, among others. There’s still time to join…

Through a $206,184 grant over three years from the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA), Stony Brook University and Stony Brook Medicine will undertake an innovative Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging research project that will bring new insights into the origins of Alzheimer’s disease. “Our partnership with the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America marks the beginning of a collaboration between our two institutions and it underscores our long-standing commitment to fostering scientific discovery and looking at ways new therapies can be developed,” said Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD. Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in…

Urothelial cancers of the bladder and upper urinary tract are among the most common cancers encountered worldwide. In the United States, urothelial cancers are among the most costly cancers to treat. With early diagnosis, followed by surgery, most urothelial cancers can be cured. Now an international team of cancer researchers including Kate Dickman, PhD, of the Department of Pharmacological Sciences and Medicine/Nephrology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine have developed a highly sensitive and specific non-invasive test as a biomarker for early detection of urothelial cancers. Details of this method known as UroSEEK, are published in eLife. UroSEEK identifies genetic errors…

When Mike Power drove to Stony Brook University’s Cancer Center on February 19, it was hard not to think of another drive he took some 35 years ago…with his mother, Emily, taking her for treatment as she suffered from breast cancer. 

“I got to the hospital in five minutes,” Power said. “I was driving like a madman, and I was young; I think I was 17 or 18 at the time. The cop’s behind me, trying to pull me over, and I wasn’t stopping. I drove right to the hospital, got out, and said, ‘My mom has to go in…

Tom MacCarthy, Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to better understand how human antibodies are generated in response to infection by using computational biology. Part of a multi-PI $3 million grant, in collaboration with the lab of immunology pioneer Matthew D. Scharff, MD at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the research will employ computational models and analysis of high-throughput DNA sequence data. “Our approach is innovative because the computational models we are proposing will test molecular mechanisms both computationally and…

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