Browsing: Student

The Stony Brook Entrepreneur Challenge held each spring provides student entrepreneurs with an avenue to win a share of a $50,000 to make their business idea into a viable company. This year five student teams are moving their ideas closer to market and have received significant support from the University’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC). At the Challenge, students pitch their ideas to a campus panel of experienced venture funders, entrepreneurs and business services professionals. Then they have the opportunity to move on to the Regional and State competitions for additional funding. For 2018, the top three Stony Brook student awards…

Stony Brook University School of Medicine student Jenny Kim is considering becoming an anesthesiologist and would like to research novel non-opioid analgesics for pain. During the 2018-19 academic year, Kim will be involved in pain research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) before she returns to Stony Brook the following year to complete her MD program. This opportunity arose as Kim was selected as one of the recipients of the NIH’s 2018-19 Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP). Kim is among 37 students selected nationwide for the fellowship. The research training program enables students to pause their university studies for…

Like many University Scholars, Abigail Cobb ‘18 assumes multiple roles on campus. Her studious side comes out when she is conducting psychology research, and an artistic side appears when she performs as a soloist with Stony Brook’s only all-female a capella troupe, The Pipettes. And there’s another side — the easygoing public persona she flashes as a barista at the East Campus Starbucks. The challenge of reconciling all these sides may explain why Abigail became a psychology major. She first became interested in the subject when she took an introductory course in her Poughkeepsie, NY, high school and was drawn…

After winning the NASA Fame Lab science communication competition in 2014, Pharmacology Postdoc Lyl Tomlinson (’17) will now make an even broader impact as one of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s (AAAS) newest science policy fellows in Washington, DC. The premiere science policy fellowship in the U.S., the AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship program brings PhD-level scientists and engineers to Washington for an exciting crash course in policy making from the front lines. Tomlinson’s one-year fellowship will place him in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of the Director, where he will contribute to NIH-wide…

“I find that research is a nice break from regular classes which are a lot of memorization, taking in a lot of information,” says biology major and aspiring surgeon Terence Thomas ’18. “Research has allowed me to take in information and also apply it – to see the application of science, see how science is turned into experiments where you analyze the research and publish.” Thomas conducts research under the mentorship of Dr. Erin Vasudevan (Neurobiology & Behavior) in the Rehabilitation Research and Movement Performance/RRAMP Laboratory. He was recently awarded the 2018 American Heart Association (AHA) Founders Affiliate Undergraduate Student Summer…

As the daughter of a civil engineer and medical doctor, Amna Haider ’18 was exposed to a barrage of ideas and information early on and learned to ask big questions. She wanted to know how things worked. She wondered why it was dangerous for some objects to come into contact with an electric current but not others. So she built a simple light bulb circuit, tested different materials and recorded her findings. It was that curiosity that helped her win first place in a science fair when she was in third grade. Years later, as a biomedical engineering major at…

Cancer researcher receives young investigator award for promising research Benjamin Martin, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, has received the Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research for his work with circulating tumor cells The award, granted to promising early career New York City-area cancer research scientists, includes a three-year $600,000 grant, effective July 1. Professor Martin and colleague David Q. Matus, PhD, are using state-of-the-art microscopy and genetic analysis of circulating tumor cells to achieve an unprecedented level of understanding about how these cells exit blood vessels and invade news sites on the…

Could the toys we loved as children predict our future careers? Just ask Prabowo Setiawan ‘18, a mechanical engineering major and University Scholar. Setiawan began playing with Lego Bionicles when he was five. Today he is building rockets as a member of the Stony Brook Chapter of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). This past month the AIAA participated in the NASA student launch competition, which entails building a high-power model rocket launch vehicle. “I was able to put the Bionicles together even an early age,” he said. “My interest in building things has just increased as I…

Mackenzie Deng, a graduating senior receiving his degree in Business Management, developed and implemented College Thursdays, a post-secondary education and preparation program for the Boys and Girls Club of Bellport (BGC). Every Thursday from October 12, 2017 to April 13, 2018, he hosted presentations, workshops and college campus visits for the club with the goal to prepare high school students in an underprivileged area for post-secondary education. While working with Ana Arias, the club’s director of teen services, Mackenzie successfully implemented more than 20 events. “I’ve spoken with some of the staff members at the club, and they stress that…

Empowered by his position as a sustainability intern for the Faculty Student Association (FSA), Edward Gallagher ’18 has worked to develop a more efficient, sustainable method to compost food waste at campus dining locations. While FSA currently composts “pre-consumer” food leftovers that no one has bought or taken, resulting in more than 6,000 lbs. of food waste converted into usable compost this semester, a program to compost leftovers that students couldn’t finish was in need of development — and Gallagher was happy to help. In his research, Gallagher came across a composting process called Bokashi, a Japanese term for “fermented…

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