Browsing: Faculty

Future astronauts spending long periods of time on the Moon could suffer bronchitis and other health problems by inhaling tiny particles of dust from its surface, according to new research. A new study from researchers at Stony Brook University finds simulated lunar soil is toxic to human lung and mouse brain cells. Up to 90 percent of human lung cells and mouse neurons died when exposed to dust particles that mimic soils found on the Moon’s surface. The results show breathing toxic dust, even in minute quantities, could pose a health hazard to future astronauts traveling to the Moon, Mars…

Howard Schneider, Founding Dean of the Stony Brook School of Journalism, is about to make his big-screen debut in the highly-praised documentary Three Identical Strangers. Schneider was extensively interviewed for the film, which tells the astonishing story of triplets separated at birth and reunited by chance as teenagers. “When people ask me what is the most remarkable human Interest story I ever encountered as reporter and editor at Newsday, I tell them: the Long Island triplets,” Schneider said. “Even now, three decades later, it is an unforgettable story.”  In 1980 Schneider was approached by a local student who told him the…

Romeil Sandhu, assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics (BMI) jointly administered by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine, has earned a 2018 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award. Sandhu received the $500,000 award for his project: Network Geometry for Analyzing Dynamical Systems. Professor Sandhu’s research is focused on how we study and develop reliable communication and social systems that are robust to potential attack. His work could help to make these systems better able to combat these types of intrusions and extends well beyond such systems to areas in cancer biology, finance, and…

Tom MacCarthy, Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to better understand how human antibodies are generated in response to infection by using computational biology. Part of a multi-PI $3 million grant, in collaboration with the lab of immunology pioneer Matthew D. Scharff, MD at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the research will employ computational models and analysis of high-throughput DNA sequence data. “Our approach is innovative because the computational models we are proposing will test molecular mechanisms both computationally and…

Building on a history of support to computer science researchers at Stony Brook University, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award to Professor Michalis Polychronakis, the Department of Computer Science has announced. Professor Polychronakis will receive a grant of $500,000 for his project: Principled and Practical Software Shielding against Advanced Exploits. The main objective of his proposed research is the design of innovative software hardening techniques, and their practical application to commodity software and systems. Polychronakis’ work is motivated by the fact that “the exploitation of vulnerabilities in popular software is among the leading causes…

Esther Sans Takeuchi, PhD, the William and Jane Knapp Endowed Chair in Energy and the Environment, a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry in the College of Arts & Sciences and in Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University, Chief Scientist of the Energy Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the holder of more than 150 patents has been named a finalist for the European Inventor Award. The European Patent Office (EPO) selected Professor Takeuchi as a finalist in the category of “Non-EPO countries.” The winners of the EPO’s 2018 innovation prize will be announced at a…

The Microscopy Society of America (MSA) has selected Yimei Zhu — a Stony Brook University adjunct professor and a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) — to receive the 2018 Distinguished Scientist Award for physical sciences. This award annually recognizes two senior scientists, one in the physical sciences and the other in biological sciences, for their long-standing record of achievement in the field of microscopy and microanalysis. “I am extremely humbled by this recognition, the highest honor of the society, and to be selected among the most distinguished scientists in the field worldwide,” said Zhu,…

Stony Brook Southampton MFA Professor Meg Wolitzer touches on second-wave feminism, the #MeToo movement and coming-of-age in her new book, The Female Persuasion. Focusing on feminist issues and gender equality, Wolitzer’s latest novel follows suit with her previous publications, including 2003’s The Wife and 2008’s The 10-Year Nap. The Female Persuasion takes place at the fictional Ryland College, where Wolitzer introduces us to freshman Greer Kadestsky and her soon-to-be mentor, Faith Frank, a veteran of the first-wave feminism movement and the founder of a semi-prominent women’s magazine. Both on the forefront of change, their dynamic creates a timeless story that illustrates what modern feminist…

By combining data on pathology images of 13 types of cancer and correlating that with clinical and genomic data, a Stony Brook University-led team of researchers are able to identify tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), called TIL maps, which will enable cancer specialists to generate tumor-immune information from routinely gathered pathology slides. Published in Cell Reports, the paper details how TIL maps are related to the molecular characterization of tumors and patient survival. The method may provide a foundation on how to better diagnose and create a treatment plan for cancers that are responsive to immune-based anti-cancer therapy, such as melanoma, lung, bladder,…

Jerrold Stein, Dean Emeritus and Advisor to the Vice President for Student Affairs, was recognized by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Foundation as a 2018 Diamond Honoree for his extensive work at Stony Brook University. The Diamond Honoree Program is both a recognition program and a fundraising activity for ACPA’s goals in furthering the development of student service professionals. The program has generated more than $100,000 since it began in 1999. Previous Diamond Honorees at Stony Brook include Dr. Dallas Bauman, Assistant Vice President for Campus Residences, and the late Dr. Peter Baigent, Vice President for Student Affairs. Stein…

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