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Fall 2015 Lectures

origami lecture

Origami and the Making of Between the Folds
by Vanessa Gould, Director of Documentary Film, Between the Folds
Wednesday, September 09, 2015 at 5 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

Over four years, director and producer Vanessa Gould researched and documented origami and paper artists around the world.  Her investigation revealed a lot of unexpected metaphors about film, life, creativity, and the idea of transformation. Gould will share observations on the enigmatic and surprising process of making Between the Folds, and the seemingly unending inspiration found in the medium of origami.

About the Speaker

Vanessa Gould is a filmmaker, editor and camera operator working in Brooklyn. Gould's film Between the Folds premiered on PBS’s Independent Lens in December 2009 and was rebroadcast the following season. In 2010, it received a Peabody Award. Between the Folds has been translated into more than ten languages and broadcast in dozens of countries on NHK, CBC, ABC, EBS, NRK, SF, SVT, Al Jazeera, Al Hurra and other networks. It screened at more than forty-five international film festivals and was recognized with numerous audience and jury awards. Gould is currently filming OBIT, a feature-length documentary about The New York Times obituaries and their writer-reporters.

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Origami Heaven
On View September 9 to December 31, 2015
Charles B. Wang Center Skylight Gallery

FILM
Between the Folds directed by Vanessa Gould
On View September 9 to December 31, 2015
Charles B. Wang Center Video Gallery

WORKSHOP
Fabric Origami Techniques with Wonju Seo
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Session 1: 1:00-2:30 PM | Session 2: 3:00-4:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel

LECTURE
Artist Talk: Kumi Yamashita
Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

LECTURE
Modular Kirigami
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 6 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

WORKSHOP
12-Card Star Construction
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 1 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel

WORKSHOP
Origami Heaven Retreat
October 31 - November 2, 2015
Hilton Garden Inn Stony Brook

 

 

 

renzi lecture

A Contemporary Art Practice from a Trans-Asian Perspective with Artist Ren Zi
Moderated by Prof. Kyunghee Pyun, SUNY Fashion Institute of Technology
Thursday, September 10, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

Ren Zi is a contemporary artist of Singapore. He studied psychology and worked as a commercial writer before he devoted himself full-time to the arts. Figurative characters in his fantastic drawings are created in digital mediums and then printed on various media such as acrylic, aluminium and bamboo paper. Ren Zi is a product of Singapore, exposed to its multi-ethnic geo-political environment as well as global currents in high art and pop culture. Professor Kyunghee Pyun will open a dialogue with this quirky artist who is also partly otaku, partly science geek, and partly utopian dreamer.

About the Artist

Like the trickster archetype populating his works, Ren Zi is a digital and mixed media artist who occupies an in-between place that defies easy categorization. Much can be attributed to being a product of the syncretic multi-ethnic milieu of his country, as well as his education in both the sciences and the arts. He studied psychology, then became an advertising copywriter before embracing fine art as his vocation.

About the Moderator

Kyunghee Pyun is an assistant professor in the department of history of art at Fashion Institute of Technology. She is working on her new book, Modern Art on the Asian Soil: Practicing Western Art 1880–2000 and has published on the diaspora of Asian artists. Her other research interests include the global trade of decorative arts in premodern Eurasia and the Americas; the usage and reception of visual art in context of religious performance and liturgy; the interplay of word and image; and the history of art collections.

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Reality Override: Mixed Media works by Ren Zi
On View September 9 to December 31, 2015
Charles B. Wang Center Zodiac Gallery

 

 

 

Art Crawl: A Guided Tour of Campus Galleries
Thursday, September 10, 2015 at 3:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Skylight Gallery

Click the images below for a close-up/larger picture.

art crawlart crawl

The Art Crawl is a free event with guided tours of all the Stony Brook University campus galleries. There is a variety of artwork that will be exhibited including work from international artists, Stony Brook students and digital artists who work in the math and sciences.

This is a two day event.

The first day is Thursday September 10th, 2015 beginning at 3:00pm at the Skylight Gallery at the Wang Center with a lecture by Origami Heaven exhibition artist Hiroshi Hayakawa and will last until 5:00pm.

The second day is Wednesday November 18th, 2015 beginning at 3:00pm at the Alloway Gallery in Melville Library and will also last until 5:00pm. Both days of the Art Crawl will end with a public reception.

 

 

 

chopsticks lecture

Chopsticks: A Cultural and Culinary History
Dr. Q. Edward Wang
Thursday, October 8, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

Chopsticks have become a quintessential part of the Japanese, Chinese and Korean culinary experience across the globe, with more than one-fifth of the world's population using them daily to eat. In this talk on the culture, custom and history of chopsticks, Q. Edward Wang will chart their evolution from a simple eating implement in ancient times to their status as a much more complex cultural symbol today. He will also illustrate how chopstick use has influenced Asian cuisine and how, in turn, the cuisine continues to influence chopstick use, both in Asia and across the globe.

A book signing will follow the lecture; books will be available for purchase.

confucius institute logo

 

sept photo
Click the image above for a close-up.

About the Speaker

Born and raised in Shanghai, Q. Edward Wang has lived in the United States for over a quarter of a century. Trained as a historian in both countries, he has taught and researched Asian and comparative history and historiography for several decades. He is now Professor of History and Coordinator of Asian Studies at Rowan University and Changjiang Professor of History at Peking University. A prolific author of a dozen books in both English and Chinese, Wang's major English publications include: Inventing China through History: The May Fourth Approach to Historiography (2001); Mirroring the Past: The Writing and Use of History in Imperial China (2005); A Global History of Modern Historiography (2008); and Chopsticks: A Cultural and Culinary History (2015).

 

 

 

kumi yamashita lecture

Artist Talk by Kumi Yamashita
Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

Much of Kumi Yamashita's artwork begins with everyday objects such as building blocks, paper, numbers and thread. While employing these everyday objects, Ms. Yamashita transforms each one in something extraordinary. Ms. Yamashita will give an overview of her work and will discuss how she has recently been inspired by origami.

About the Artist

Born in Japan but now working in New York City, Kumi Yamashita’s work has been exhibited at venues both nationally and internationally, including including the Seattle Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Yerba Buena Center in San Francisco, the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, the Honolulu Museum of Art, and the Liverpool Biennial.

Ms. Yamashita received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, and her Master of Fine Arts degree from the Glasgow School of Art in the United Kingdom.

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Origami Heaven
On View September 9 to December 31, 2015
Charles B. Wang Center Skylight Gallery, Video Gallery

LECTURE
Origami and the Making of Between the Folds
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 at 5 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

WORKSHOP
Fabric Origami Techniques with Wonju Seo
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Session 1: 1:00-2:30 PM | Session 2: 3:00-4:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel

LECTURE
Modular Kirigami
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 6 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

WORKSHOP
12-Card Star Construction
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 1 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel

WORKSHOP
Origami Heaven Retreat
October 31 - November 2, 2015
Hilton Garden Inn Stony Brook

 

 

 

origami lecture

Modular Kirigami
by George Hart
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 6 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

Related to origami (paper folding) is kirigami (paper cutting) and just as modular origami involves assembling many identical pieces of folded paper, so modular kirigami involves assembling many identical pieces of cut paper to make a beautiful symmetric structure. This talk will be a highly visual introduction to the techniques of modular kirigami and some of the mathematical ideas that underlie it.

About the Artist

George W. Hart is a research professor at Stony Brook University and an interdisciplinary sculptor, mathematician, computer scientist, and educator. His geometric sculpture is recognized around the world for its mathematical depth and creative use of materials. He is a pioneer in the use of computer technology and 3D printing in the design and fabrication of sculpture. Examples of his artwork can be seen at major universities, such as M.I.T., U.C. Berkeley, Duke University, Princeton University, and Stony Brook University. He is the associate editor for sculpture of the Journal of Mathematics and the Arts and is a co-founder of the Museum of Mathematics. Hart holds a B.S. in Mathematics from MIT (1977), an M.A. in Linguistics from Indiana University (1979), and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT (1987).

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Origami Heaven
On View September 9 to December 31, 2015
Charles B. Wang Center Skylight Gallery, Video Gallery

LECTURE
Origami and the Making of Between the Folds
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 at 5 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

WORKSHOP
Fabric Origami Techniques with Wonju Seo
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Session 1: 1:00-2:30 PM | Session 2: 3:00-4:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel

LECTURE
Artist Talk: Kumi Yamashita
Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

WORKSHOP
12-Card Star Construction
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 1 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel

WORKSHOP
Origami Heaven Retreat
October 31 - November 2, 2015
Hilton Garden Inn Stony Brook

 

 

 


Spring 2015 Lectures

triple package lecture

Book Talk: The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America
by Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld
Sunday, February 22, 2015, 2PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

Due to inclement weather, this event has been canceled. We're sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Why do some groups rise over others? Drawing on groundbreaking original research and startling statistics, Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld reveal the secrets to success from their controversial New York Times bestseller The Triple Package,, at WSHU Public Radio’s “Join the Conversation.” According to these authors, the “Triple Package” is a rare and potent cultural constellation of three elements: a superiority complex, insecurity and impulse control. Chua and Rubenfeld acknowledge that it is “difficult to talk about” the relative success of some ethnic or cultural groups because the topic “feels racially charged,” yet they also claim that “the facts actually debunk racial stereotypes.”

A book signing will follow the lecture; books will be available for purchase.

About the Speakers

Amy Chua is the John M. Duff Professor of Law at Yale Law School. She is the author of World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability and Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global Dominance--and Why They Fall. Chua's Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother was an international bestseller. Her latest book The Triple Package, coauthored with husband Jed Rubenfeld, was a New York Times bestseller. In 2011, Time magazine named Chua one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Jed Rubenfeld is the Robert R. Slaughter Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He is the author of two books on constitutional law, Freedom and Time: A Theory of Constitutional Self-Government and Revolution by Judiciary: The Structure of American Constitutional Law, as well as two novels, the international bestsellers The Death Instinct and The Interpretation of Murder. Chua and Rubenfeld live with their family in Connecticut.

wshu logo
For tickets, go to www.wshu.org

 

 

 

lord siva's song lecture

Book Talk: Lord Siva’s Song: The Isvara Gita
by Andrew J. Nicholson
Monday, February 23, 2015, 4 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

While the Bhagavad Gita is an acknowledged treasure of world spiritual literature, few people know a parallel text, the Isvara Gita. This lesser­known work is also dedicated to a god, but in this case it is Siva, rather than Krsna, who is depicted as the omniscient creator of the world. Andrew J. Nicholson’s Lord Siva’s Song makes this text available in English in an accessible new translation. A work of both poetry and philosophy, the Isvara Gita builds on the insights of Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras and foreshadows later developments in tantric yoga. It deals with the pluralistic religious environment of early medieval India through an exploration of the relationship between the gods Siva and Visnu. The work condemns sectarianism and violence and provides a strategy for accommodating conflicting religious claims in its own day and in our own.

A book signing will follow the lecture; books will be available for purchase.

Organized by the MATTOO CENTER FOR INDIA STUDIES.

center for india studies logo

 

About the Speaker

nicholson headshotAndrew J. Nicholson is Associate Professor of Hinduism and Indian Intellectual History at Stony Brook University. His Ph.D. is from the University of Chicago’s Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations, and he has studied Sanskrit, Indian philosophy, and yoga with teachers in India. He is also the author of Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History (Columbia University Press), which won the American Academy of Religion's Award for Best First Book in the History of Religions.

 

 

 

african monuments lecture

Artist Talk and Video Screening: Mansudae Master Class: African Public Monuments Courtesy of North Korean Artists
By Onejoon Che and Professor Sohl Lee
Wednesday, March 4, 2015, 4 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

Why is it that today, all across Africa, so many statues and monuments are made by North Koreans? South Korean artist Onejoon Che explores this question in his multi-media project Mansudae Master Class. The project includes photographs and videos of massive African public art projects like the Tiglachin Monument (1984, Ethiopia) and African Renaissance Monument (2010, Senegal) made by North Koreans as well as archival research that reveals the geopolitical forces underpinning their construction. The project as a whole presents a glimpse into the power of utopian imagination and socialist fiction. The event will begin with a video screening, followed by an artist talk moderated by Sohl Lee, an Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary East Asian Art in the Department of Art at Stony Brook University.

The lecture is organized by the Center of Korean Studies, SBU Art Department and the Charles B. Wang Center.

sbu art department logo

About the Artists

Che Onejoon (b. 1979, South Korea) has for the past few years investigated the relationship between sub-Saharan African countries and North Korea in an attempt to see the ongoing Cold War on the Korean peninsula from a new geopolitical perspective. Che’s previous projects –– including Texas Project (2004–2007), Townhouse (2006–2010) and Spinning Wheel (2011) ––make visible the hidden and unarticulated sites of South Korea’s tumultuous path to modernity. He has participated in a number of exhibitions in Atelier Hermès, PLATEAU (Seoul), the Palais de Tokyo, and the Musée du quai Branly (Paris), as well as the Seoul Media Biennale (2014) and the Korean Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale (2014). The most recent edition of Mansudae Master Class will be featured in the New Museum Triennial (2015).

 

 

 

lee talbot lecture

Precious Cargo: Chinese Baby Carriers in Global Context
by Lee Talbot, Curator at The Textile Museum at The George Washington University Museum
Wednesday, March 11, 2015, 5PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre


Highlighting precious traditions and the culture of baby carriers from Taiwan and Southwestern China, Lee Talbot discusses symbolic meanings behind baby carrier embroidery and also draws parallels between this unique textile form and those of other countries.

 

About the Speaker

Lee Talbot is Curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections at the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., where he specializes in East Asian textile history. Before joining the Textile Museum staff he spent two and a half years as curator at the Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum at Sookmyung Women’s University in Seoul, Korea. His recent exhibitions include Dragons, Nagas, and Creatures of the Deep (2012); Woven Treasures of Japan’s Tawaraya Workshop (2012); Green: the Color and the Cause (2011) and Second Lives: The Age-Old Art of Recycling Textiles (2011). Talbot’s publications include chapters on China and Korea in History of Design: Decorative Arts and Material Culture, 1400-2000 (Bard Graduate Center/Yale University Press, 2013); Threads of Heaven: Textiles in East Asian Ritual and Ceremony (Sookmyung Women’s University Press, 2006); Art by the Yard: Women Design Mid-Century Britain (The Textile Museum, 2010); and articles on various aspects of decorative art and design history.

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Love and Blessings: The Art of Baby Carriers
Collection from the National Museum of Prehistory of Taiwan
On View March 11 - July 15
Skylight Gallery

 

 

 

japanese gardens lecture

Quiet Beauty: Japanese Gardens in North America and Long Island
by Dr. Kendall Brown
Saturday, March 14, 2015, 1PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

This lecture explores the long history of Japanese gardens in North America, connecting the evolution of garden styles and meanings to stages in U.S.-Japan political and cultural relations. It also examines how the illustrious history of private and public Japanese gardens on Long Island connect to the larger context of American history.

The talk will conclude with a discussion about the major changes in the social function of Asian gardens in North America in the 21st century.

A book signing will follow the lecture; books will be available for purchase.

 

About the Speaker

Dr. Kendall Brown is Professor of Asian Art History at California State University Long Beach. Dr. Brown is also a leading figure in the study of Japanese gardens in North America. His most recent book, Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America, was published by Tuttle in 2013. It expands on his earlier work, Japanese-style Gardens of the Pacific West Coast(Rizzoli, 1999). He recently published the lead essays in the book One Hundred Tears in the Huntington’s Japanese Gardens: Harmony with Nature (2013), which addresses the history of the Japanese gardens at the Huntington Botanical Garden and Library. Dr. Brown is President of the Board of the North American Japanese Garden Association. He received a Ph.D. in art history from Yale University.

 

 

 

 

ramen lecture

Lecture: How Did Rāmen Become Japan’s ‘National Food’ (Kokuminshoku)?
With Chef Mamie Nishide
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1


Why did rāmen achieve national symbolic status in Japan during the 1990s, and what can be gleaned about the relationship between food, mass media, and labor by studying this transformation? In attempting to address these questions, the talk will consider the connection between the macro-economic shifts affecting the Japanese economy in this era and the transformation in the cultural milieu associated with the consumption of rāmen. The aim is to identify the logic behind the transformation of a food custom associated with a specific subgroup into a national tradition.

 

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
The Everyday Joys of Japan: Paintings By Jiro Osuga
On View March 11 - July 15
Jasmine Gallery

CRAFT WORKSHOP
Japanese Flower Arrangement with Toyomi Shibahara
Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 1PM
Chapel
 

CULINARY WORKSHOP
Make your Own Japanese Rāmen with Chef Mamie Nishide
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 @ 1-2:30 PM
Chapel

 

 

 

tibet buddhist print lecture

Tibetan Buddhist Printing from the Derge Parkhang
by Dr. Patrick Dowdey
Thursday, April 23, 2015, 4 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1

art crawl icon* Note: This lecture was a part of the ART CRAWL, the first major guided tour involving all SBU Galleries.

Click the image below for a close-up of the map.

art crawl 1art crawl 2


In conjunction with Pearl of the Snowlands: Tibetan Buddhist Printing from the Derge Parkhang, exhibition curator Patrick Dowdey offers a history of Derge and discusses the serendipitous survival of the nearly 300-year old Derge Sutra Printing House and its importance to the people of this region of Eastern Tibet.

 

About the Speaker

Patrick Dowdey is the curator at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies and an adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Wesleyan University

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Pearl of the Snowlands: Tibetan Buddhist Printing From The Derge Parkhang
On View March 11 - July 15
Zodiac Gallery

 

 

 

silk road lecture

Food and China's Silk Road: Influences to and from the West
by Dr. Jacqueline M. Newman
Wendesday, May 6, 2015 at 1 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

Dr. Newman discusses the East-West cultural exchanges that occurred on the Silk Road through the medium of food.  Cultural exchange through food began in the city of Xian, China and continued on through the Mediterranean and beyond.  A food tasting will follow Dr. Newman’s presentation, featuring recipes from the Jacqueline M. Newman Chinese Cookbook Collection, part of Stony Brook University Libraries' Special Collections. Composed of more than 4,000 rare and scarce English-language cookbooks and unique research materials, it is the world's largest collection of its type. Copies of the recipes will be provided to guests.

Co-sponsored by Special Collections of the University Libraries, The Confucius institute and the Charles B. Wang Center.

confucius logo

About the Speaker

Dr. Jacqueline M. Newman is an emeritus art history professor of Queens College and the founder and editor of the award-winning magazine Flavor and Fortune which is the first and only American, English-language quarterly about Chinese food and dietary culture. In 2002 Dr. Newman made a significant gift of 4,000 Chinese cookbooks, culinary magazines and related audio-visual materials to Stony Brook University Libraries Special Collections. It is the largest collection of its type in the world.

 

 

 

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Charles B. Wang Center

Stony Brook University
100 Nicolls Road
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4040

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Phone: (631) 632-4400
Fax: (631) 632-9503
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