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Courses: Spring 2015

GRADUATE COURSES IN SOUTHAMPTON 

 

HYBRID VERSION CWL 500.S01/S60 Intro to Graduate Writing, Robert Reeves & Carla Caglioti.

Mondays, 5:20-8:10. (Class #57093-Southampton & #48387 Manhattan )

Please note : CWL 500 is a required course that should be taken in the first year. A seminar that introduces students to one another, the faculty, the program in Writing and Literature, and to issues in contemporary writing. Offered in conjunction with the Manhattan “Writers Speak” lecture series. Students will attend the regular series of readings sponsored by the Writing program and meet at weekly intervals under the direction of a faculty advisor to discuss and write about topics raised in the lecture series, as well as issues generated from seminar discussions and assigned readings. Meets in both Southampton and Manhattan.

 

CWL 510.S01 Forms of Fiction: The Novel, Ursula Hegi.

Wednesdays 4:00-6:50 (Class #46884)

We'll explore the connections that arise in the process of writing and revising a novel. We'll work with character and plot development, voice, point of view, dialogue that distinguishes between characters, significant details, authenticity, and risk.

 

CWL 510.S02 Forms of Fiction: Writing Everything: Three Characters in Search of an Author, Roger Rosenblatt.

Tuesdays 2:20-5:10 (Class #49221)

How to create a character? A character in a work of fiction; in a play or a movie; in a poem, whether we are talking about a character who speaks a poem, like the Duke of Ferrara, who tells the tale of his last duchess, or the character described by the teller of the tale, such as the last duchess herself, or the poet's own persona who functions as the "I" of his or her poems; or in a personal essay or a memoir, insofar as the voice who tells an autobiographical story is a character created by the author to be the author. You want consistencies, so that the character is identifiable and recognizable. You want inconsistencies, so that the character feels human. You want a level of completeness and importance, so that the reader remembers your character as unique or as representative of a type, a metaphor. In short: Emma, Pip, Hamlet, Prufrock, the speaker of The Prelude or " Daddy", the speaker of Montaigne's essays and of Nabokov's Speak Memory. All are characters requiring the careful attention of an author. In this case, you.

In our course, you will develop three different characters by writing a series of pieces, which we will look at together in class. In each instance, your aim, not unlike Dr. Frankenstein's, will be to create a person of certain attributes associated with being human -- a searching, growing, changing, complex and perhaps dangerous creature who speaks for you. At the end of the course, one hopes  that you will have three distinct characters you later may relocate in the general scheme of your work. Whether or not that comes to pass, you will, at any rate, have discovered three notable residents of your imaginative mind.

 

CWL 520.S01 Forms of Poetry: Poetry on Location, Star Black.

8 Saturdays, 11:00A-5:00P 1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 3/1, 3/7, 3/28 (Class #49059)

This course, “Poetry on Location: Writing from East End Art and Nature,” moves out of the classroom to write poems, prose poems, flash fiction or brief essays on location, inspired by the East End's artists and coastal landscape. Field trips include the Parrish Art Museum in Watermill, Guild Hall in East Hampton, the Whalers Museum in Sag Harbor, and the shoreline.

Students will develop their individual style of creative writing in whichever form they choose–poetry, fiction, non-fiction–with additional weekly take-home assignments that use the work of contemporary and historical poets as touchstones to expanding the imagination and creative ideas as a writer and to sharpen skills in sentence structure and precision of descriptive detail. Students will create an illustrated chapbook containing their original work produced during the course as their final paper.

 

CWL 520.S02 Forms of Poetry: Short Shorts (Flash Fiction/Prose Poem), Terese Svoboda.

Fridays, 3:30P - 6:20P (Class #57427)

Is it a bird or a plane? You decide which flies. This course will focus on short prose in which language is looked at, not through, and on poetry that toes prose's line. Words and their arrangement can be the most compelling and interesting part of very short stories, not plot (there are only two) or character (often just the author’s)--but what happens when there's poetry? You bring the words, and we’ll talk. Participants will also show and tell a piece of prose poetry history.

 

CWL 540.S01 Forms of Nonfiction: Memoir, Lou Ann Walker.

Thursdays 5:20-8:10 (Class #47247)

Students will focus on telling their own stories, using a variety of techniques gleaned from masters of the form. We'll discuss the handling of secrets, the nature of the memoir versus the personal essay, the infusion of fiction into memoir, and the nature of privacy.

 

CWL 560.S01 Forms of Literature: Children’s Literature, Emma Walton Hamilton and Patricia McCormick.

Mondays 11:20-2:10 (Class #48388)

A workshop in writing for kids, from picture books and early reader chapter books to middle grade and YA novels. We'll spend a couple of weeks on each genre. Students who wish to continue with children’s literature will have an opportunity to study a genre in greater depth during the summer session. Available by Skype.

 

CWL 565.S01 Special Topics in Writing: Visual Storytelling/Graphic Novel, Jules Feiffer.

Wednesdays 1:00-3:50 (Class #46885)

This course, in reading and writing the graphic novel, traces the rise of the comics medium from the 1890s to the present, from Little Nemo to Kill My Mother. During the first half of each meeting, we will analyze the works of the innovators in the field, examine styles of story telling and styles of dramatizing, and study step by step breakdowns of how a format of panels on a page, presented in vari-sized and angled words and pictures—and in wordless pictures—can rewire our senses and perceptions. We will cover a vast panoply of story telling modes: pulp-style adventure (noir), family drama, intimate confession, outré humor. We will look into children’s picture books, comic strips and comic books, alternative media, graphic novels for how each form plays with and against a reader’s expectations in games of visual sleight of hand. The second half of our meetings will be analysis and discussion of students’ work based on class assignments, presented in a comics format. Artistic talent welcomed, but not required; rudimentary doodles acceptable.

 

CWL 570: Advanced Writing Workshop: Revising Toward Authorial Voice, Megan McAndrew.

Tuesdays 5:20-8:10 (Class #57222)
This seminar, which is aimed at students working on a novel, memoir or short story collection, will explore the ways in which authors create distinctive voices, with an eye to our own. What makes a narrator compelling?  How does the choice of first, second or third person affect tone?  Why does point of view matter?  Past or present tense?  By analyzing selections from Adam Gopnik, Jhumpa Lahiri, Junot Diaz, Elizabeth Strout, Kathryn Harrison and others, and through weekly critiques of students' work, we will address the fundamental challenge that faces all writers: the development of a narrative voice that will keep readers turning the page.  

 

CWL 580.S01 Practicum in Arts Admin, Christian McLean.

Wednesdays 11:00-12:50 & TBA (Class #46889)  

The essentials of arts administration, to include assisting in the coordination of reading and lecture series, planning and administering conferences, or other writing and arts administration activities. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

 

CWL 582.S01 Practicum in Publishing & Editing, Lou Ann Walker/Susan Scarf Merrell.

Thursdays 2:20-5:10 (Class #46887)  

Under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students will be exposed to the hands-on process of editing and publishing The Southampton Review. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.- All Southampton classes are held in Chancellors Hall

 

Thesis - CWL 599.V01
Must have thesis planning form on file and approval of thesis advisor to register.   

 

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GRADUATE COURSES IN MANHATTAN
Stony Brook Manhattan
101-113 East 27th St. (midway between Park Avenue South and Lexington), 3rd Floor

HYBRID VERSION CWL 500.S01 Intro to Graduate Writing, Robert Reeves & Carla Caglioti.

Mondays, 5:20-8:10. (Class #57093-Southampton & #48387 Manhattan)

Please note : CWL 500 is a required course that should be taken in the first year. A seminar that introduces students to one another, the faculty, the program in Writing and Literature, and to issues in contemporary writing. Offered in conjunction with the “Writers Speak” lecture series. Students will attend the regular series of readings sponsored by the Writing program and meet at weekly intervals under the direction of a faculty advisor to discuss and write about topics raised in the lecture series, as well as issues generated from seminar discussions and assigned readings. Meets in both Southampton and Manhattan.

 

CWL 510.S60 Forms of Fiction: Novel: The Soggy Middle and Other Troubles, Meg Wolitzer.

3 weekends, 1/31-2/1 ; 3/7-3/8 ; 4/11-4/12  (Class #49058)

Whether working on short stories or novels, all writers run into big problems sometimes.  These include the "Strong start/flabby middle" syndrome, the "I've been working this piece to death and I can't even see it clearly anymore" syndrome, the "Should I change it from third-person to first person?" syndrome, the "Is my long story actually a novel?" syndrome, or the "Should I abandon the whole thing and go on to something new, or stick with it until the end?" syndrome, among many others.  Working together and focusing on one another's manuscripts, as well as on short, dynamic exercises, this problem-solving workshop is designed to help writers figure their way out of a tight spot and transform their fiction. 

 

CWL 540.S60 Forms of Creative Nonfiction: Memoir and Essay Writing for Today’s Market, Kaylie Jones.

Thursdays, 5:20-8:10 (Class #47731)

In this workshop, we will discuss different publication venues available to the struggling writer, with an emphasis on the personal essay and how to polish shorter works to send out for publication. These essays can be used as a springboard for launching a book-length memoir. Prompts and exercises will be given and the writing will be discussed in class. We will read passages from published memoirs and essays in contemporary magazines.

 

CWL 560.S60 Forms of Literature: Contemporary Literature: Dis-Ease: Reading & Writing Illness, Daniel Menaker.

Wednesdays, 5:20-8:50 (Class #57094)

A patient, long before he becomes a subject of medical scrutiny, is at first simply a storyteller, a narrator of suffering, a traveler who has visited the kingdom of the ill.  

--Siddhartha Mukherjee, The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer

In this course, we will read and write about the place that mental and physical illness holds in literature, both fiction and nonfiction, and in the work of others and our own. Our reading into the emerging field of narrative medicine leads us to the possibility that the story we tell about an illness can in itself be good medicine. 

 

CWL 565.S60 Special Topics in Writing: Humor & Truth: Humor Writing, Patty Marx.

Tuesdays 5:20-8:10 (Class #47336)

“Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility.”   James Thurber

“Comedy has to be based on truth. You take the truth and you put a little curlicue at the end.”  Sid Caesar

“Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die.”  Mel Brooks

 “...An amateur thinks it's really funny if you dress a man up as an old lady, put him in a wheelchair, and give the wheelchair a push that sends it spinning down a slope towards a stone wall. For a pro, it's got to be a real old lady.”  Groucho Marx

 “What is comedy? Comedy is the art of making people laugh without making them puke.”  Steve Martin

“You know, crankiness is the essence of all comedy.”   Jerry Seinfeld

“Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” E.B. White

“Patty Marx is the best teacher in the Creative Writing Program”   Patricia Marx

One of the above quotations is false.  Find out which one in this humor-writing workshop, where you will read, listen to, and watch comedic samples from well-known and lesser-known humorists, and complete weekly writing assignments. Students already working on projects are welcome to develop them.

- All Manhattan classes are held at 101-113 East 27 Street, 3 floor

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSES ON WEST CAMPUS

 

CWL190-B Introduction to Contemporary Literature

S01 Mon/Wed, 8:30-9:50A (Class # 53000), Jennifer Lobaugh, Ikwo Ntekim HUM 1023

S02 Tues/Thur, 10:00A-11:20A (Class # 57100), Jennifer Nissley, Kaitlin Williams CHEM128

Seminar surveying recent works in a genre or topic, to introduce students to poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction or a combination of selections focusing on a particular theme. Participants will develop skills of interpretation and analysis through reading and writing about contemporary literature.  Required for the minor.

Prerequisite: Completion of DEC A

 

CWL 202-D (ARTS) Introduction to Creative Writing

S02 Mon/Fri, 1:00-2:20P (Class # 52999 ), Julianne Jones SOCBEH N108

S03 Tues/Thur, 8:30-9:50A (Class # 57099 ), Emily Gilbert SOCBEH N104

S04 Tues/Thur, 11:30A-12:50P (Class # 57101 ), Nora Decter PSYCH A144

S05 Tues/Thur, 1:00-2:20P (Class # 57102 ), Alison Fairbrother PSYCH A144

S06 Tues/Thur, 2:30-3:50P (Class # 57103), Emmett Haq SOCBEH N103

S07 Mon/Wed/Fri, 10:00-10:53A (Class # 57106), Adrian Bonenberger, SOCBEH N110

Creative writing workshop in multiple genres, from fiction to poetry to scriptwriting, intended to introduce students to the basic tools and terminology of the fine art of creative writing. Participants also read contemporary works, give a public reading, and attend readings by others. Required for the minor.

Prerequisite: None

 

CWL 305G-S01 Forms of Fiction

            Tues/Thur, 10:00-11:20A (Class # 53001 ), Emily Gilbert, LIBRARY N3074

Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through fiction, with examples from the tradition that illustrate point of view, character development, dialogue, plot, setting, theme, motif, and other elements. Areas of study include Short Story, Novella, The Popular Novel, Graphic Novels and Writing Funny. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: CWL 202-D

 

CWL 310G-S01 Forms of Poetry

            Tues/Thur, 11:30A-12:50P (Class # 57104 ), Julie Sheehan, LIFE SCI 054

Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through poetry, with examples from the tradition of such tools as metaphor and image, sound, line, form, and juxtaposition. Areas of study include Powers of Poetry, Bright Containers: Form & Meter, and Methods & Madness, a study of the philosophical vs. visionary strains in poetry. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: CWL 202-D

 

CWL 340-J-S01  Topics in World Literature for Writers

            Tues/Thurs, 1:00-2:20P, (Class # 57105 ), Emmett Haq, HARRIMAN 115

A literature course for writers concentrating on one area, to be announced in the course schedule, of non-Western culture. Topics could include a contemporary or historical trend, a social issue, or any other topic of expression that illuminates national, regional or cultural difference, as, for example, Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia and Beyond; Contemporary World Fiction for Writers; Reading Nature in Japanese Poetry; Varieties of the Short Story; and Asian Theatre and Drama. The emphasis will be on scholarly analysis, but with engagement of student writers. Students may repeat this course as topic changes.

Prerequisite: completion of D.E.C. B

Advisory Prerequisite: CWL 190