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Courses: Fall 2016


GRADUATE COURSES IN SOUTHAMPTON

CWL 500.S01 Introduction to Graduate Writing, Robert Reeves & Carla Caglioti

Wednesdays, 5:20-8:10 pm (Class #88955) A seminar that introduces students to one another, the faculty, the program in Creative Writing and Literature, and to issues in contemporary writing. Offered in conjunction with the Writers Speak lecture series. Students will attend the regular series of readings sponsored by the Writing program and meet at weekly intervals under the direction of a faculty advisor to discuss and write about topics raised in the lecture series, as well as issues generated from seminar discussions and assigned readings. Please note : CWL 500 is a required course that should be taken in the first year.


CWL 510.S01 Forms of Fiction:
Investigating the Short Story , Susan Merrell

Wednesdays, 2:20-5:10 pm (Class #88954) The class will examine the short story from structural, historical and psychological angles. Reading widely across the genre while producing their own stories, students will develop a conscious set of rules for story craftsmanship.

 

CWL 520.S01 Forms of Poetry: Powers of Poetry, Julie Sheehan

Thursdays, 11:20 am -2:10 pm (Class #88956) Workshop focused on the seven great powers of poetry: image, particularity, wildness, juxtaposition/parataxis, repetition, sound, and form. Alongside the participants' own work, written from weekly prompts, a course reader will supply examples drawn from contemporary poetry, with occasional examples from earlier in the tradition. Participants will comment on each other's work and on the readings. By semester's end, participants will have seven polished, revised poems and a working knowledge of the tools most often wielded by contemporary practitioners. This is an excellent workshop both for poets seeking to hone their craft through revision and for writers in other genres who are curious to explore the power of poetry.

 

CWL 535.S01 Writing in Multiple Genres: Imagining What You Know, Roger Rosenblatt

Tuesdays, 2:20-5:10 pm (Class #96482) A workshop in the uses of the imagination in different forms of writing. Students will produce both comic and serious pieces, including satires, parodies, fantasies, fables, essays and stories.

 

CWL 540.S01 Forms of Creative Nonfiction: Memoir, Melissa Bank .

Mondays, 5:20-8:10 pm (Class #89566) In this workshop on the memoir, we will be figuring out how you can make your autobiographical stories as powerful as they can be, through discussing each other's work and looking at the masters of the genre.

 

CWL 565.S01 Topics in Writing : Reading and Writing Plays, Demons & Idiots, Bill Burford

Tuesdays, 5:20-8:10 (Class # 91088).    Clown? Addicted to bad behavior? Apparently sociable, deeply conflicted misfit? Put these gifts to work for both actor and audience. Read and discuss a range of stage scripts with director Bill Burford. Free-draft stage pieces. Enlist traditional ways of creating theatrical impact. Prep ideas for performance. Wed artful play to true hell, and set free the idiot (or demon) within!   

 

CWL 580.S01 Practicum in Arts Admin, Christian McLean.

Days and Times TBA (Class #89338) The essentials of arts administration, to include assisting in the coordination of reading and lecture series, planning and administering conferences, or other writing and arts administration activities. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

 

CWL 581.S01 Practicum in Teaching Writing, Megan McAndrew, Julie Sheehan

Wednesdays, 10:30 am - 1:20 pm (Class #96484) CH 235 This course, offered in combination with undergraduate sections of CWL 202, Intro to Creative Writing, provides hands-on experience and instruction in the basics of writing pedagogy, including designing writing assignments, sequencing assignments, motivating writing, writing skill development and evaluating writing. Students will also be given a preliminary overview of the major theories driving composition pedagogy. Travel to main campus is a part of this course. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

 

CWL 582.S01 Practicum in Publishing & Editing, Lou Ann Walker

Thursdays 2:20-5:10 pm (Class #91834) CH 202  Under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students will be exposed to the hands-on process of editing and publishing The Southampton Review. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

 

CWL 599.V12 Thesis Preparation, Julie Sheehan

Wednesdays, 5:20-6:10 pm, available via Skype (Class # 96641 ) This section is for students who will begin working on thesis during this term, but who have not yet completed the process of arranging their advisement. At first, we will meet weekly, then we will phase out class time as students move into work with their advisors. Thesis students who already have advisors will register in that advisor's section of thesis.

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GRADUATE COURSES IN MANHATTAN

Stony Brook Manhattan
387 Park Avenue South
Enter on E 27th St. between Park and Lexington, 3rd Floor

 

CWL 510.S60 Forms of Fiction: Novel, Susan Minot

Tuesdays, 5:20-8:10 pm (Class #89567). A main characteristic of the novel is that casts a wide net in terms of definition and form. In the course we will read a selection of novels and novellas with an eye to a variety of styles, to innovation and originality, to subtlety and command.  Among the authors we will consider: Evan S Connell, Jane Gardam, John Williams, Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Jenny Offill, Muriel Spark. 

 

CWL 520.S60 Forms of Poetry: Writing from Art at New York City's Museums, Star Black

Eight Saturdays, 11 am - 5 pm, 9/3, 9/10, 9/17, 9/24, 10/1, 10/15, 10/22, 11/5 (Class #91782). New York City has long been a global center for the visual arts, and for artists and writers. In this course, we will visit The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Guggenheim, The Whitney, The New Museum, and The Brooklyn Museum, as well as other museums, such as The Rubin Museum and The Morgan Library. At every museum visited, each student will write three "ekphrastic" pieces – creative writing, in the form of poems, prose poems or flash fiction, that is inspired by a work of art. Students select three works of art that intrigue them, document each one with a cell phone photo, and then write on location. In-class and take-home weekly writing assignments will also be given. The final paper will be an illustrated sequence of each student's writing during the course. Students meet at SBM to share their writing at 11:00 a.m., followed by lunch at 1:20 p.m. and a museum visit until 5:00 p.m. Please note: Students should bring student i.d.s and be prepared, at some museums, to pay discounted admission fees.

 

CWL 540.S60 Forms of Creative Nonfiction: Dwight Garner

Thursdays, 5:20-8:10 pm (Class #96625) Course description about book criticism and other essayistic forms to come.

Dwight Garner is a book critic for the New York Times. A former senior editor of the New York Times Book Review, he was the founding books editor of Salon.com. His writing has appeared in Harper's Magazine, The Oxford American, The Nation, Slate, Vanity Fair, and elsewhere, and he is at work on a biography of James Agee.

 

CWL 560.S60 Forms of Literature : Fact, Fiction & the Heart of the Story, Lou Ann Walker.

Mondays, 4:00-6:50 pm (Class #96483) When should a story be told in memoir form? As a short story? Do the series of events deserve to be a novel? During this course we will look at the ways in which other writers have told the same story via nonfiction and fiction. Which approach works better for which events? We'll be discussing structure, style and substance as students attack their stories from a number of different points of entry.

 

CWL 565.S60 Special Topics in Writing (or sub for CWL535 in degree audit): Humor Writing, Patricia Marx

Wednesdays, 5:20-8:10 pm (Class #90437)

"Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility."   James Thurber

"Comedy has to be based on truth. You take the truth and you put a little curlicue at the end."  Sid Caesar

"Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die."  Mel Brooks

 "...An amateur thinks it's really funny if you dress a man up as an old lady, put him in a wheelchair, and give the wheelchair a push that sends it spinning down a slope towards a stone wall. For a pro, it's got to be a real old lady."  Groucho Marx

 "What is comedy? Comedy is the art of making people laugh without making them puke."  Steve Martin

"You know, crankiness is the essence of all comedy."   Jerry Seinfeld

"Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it."  E.B. White

"Patty Marx is the best teacher in the Creative Writing Program."  Patricia Marx

One of the above quotations is false.  Find out which one in this humor-writing workshop, where you will read, listen to, and watch comedic samples from well-known and lesser-known humorists, and complete weekly writing assignments. Students already working on projects are welcome to develop them. 

 

CWL 580.S01 Practicum in Arts Administration, Carla Caglioti

Alternate Mondays, 7:00-8:00 pm (Class #91727). Arts Administration takes the disparate threads of literary artists, literary events, audiences and business strategies and weaves them together to create a sustainable community for the arts.  This practicum will be a hands-on exploration of the question, "If You Build It, Will They Come?"

We will look at the opportunities and obstacles in building sustainable arts programming in Manhattan.  The class will be given a budget from which to research, develop, schedule and market our literary arts program with the goal of building community and establishing traditions for Manhattan.  This practicum will introduce participants to the "business of the arts," providing an overview of the types of work that arts administrators do and the current issues and trends arts management professionals face. By the end of the course, students will have developed an understanding of the critical areas which arts administrators must manage, including budgeting, marketing/publicity, fundraising, audience development, surveying and analysis, scheduling, and contracts. Permission of instructor and completion of at least 6 program credits required.

 

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSES - ALL HELD ON WEST CAMPUS

 

CWL190 Introduction to Contemporary Literature

S01 Tues/Thur, 10:00A-11:20A (Class #94795), Jonathan Green MELVILLE LBR E4315

Seminar surveying recent works in a genre or topic, to introduce students to poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction or a combination of selections focusing on a particular theme. Participants will develop skills of interpretation and analysis through reading and writing about contemporary literature. Required for the minor.

Prerequisite: WRT 102
Prerequisite: CWL 202

DEC:      B
SBC:     HUM
3 credits

 

CWL 202 Introduction to Creative Writing:

S01 Mon/Wed, 8:30-9:50A (Class # 94796), Rashaun Allen SOCBEHAV SCI N115         
S02 Mon/Fri 1-2:20P (Class # 94797), Howard Gunston
SOCBEHAV SCI N115
S03 Tues/Thur, 8:30-9:50A (Class # 94798), Nicole Hebdon SOCBEHAV SCI N115
S04 Tues/Thur 10-11:20A (Class # 94799), Caitlin Mullen HUMANITIES 2045
S05 Tues/Thur, 11:30A-12:50P (Class # 94800), Rachel Ansong, FREY HALL 316
S06 Tues/Thur, 1:00-2:20P (Class # 94801), Lauren Harvey PHYSICS P129
S07 Tues/Thur, 2:30-3:50P (Class # 94802), Melanie Sooter SOCBEHAV SCI N115
S08 Mon/Wed/Fri, 10:00-10:53A (Class # 94803), Sophia Rubenstein SOCBEHAV SCI N115

Creative writing workshop in multiple genres, from fiction to poetry to scriptwriting, intended to introduce students to the basic tools and terminology of the fine art of creative writing. Participants also read contemporary works, give a public reading, and attend a reading series. This course, offered on both Southampton and main campus, is required for the minor in creative writing. Prerequisite: None

DEC:      D
SBC:     ARTS
3 credits

 

CWL 300 Forms of Creative Nonfiction

S01 Tuesdays, 4:00-6:50P (Class # 94809), Lindsey Camp SOCBEHAV SCI N115

Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through creative nonfiction, with examples from the tradition and exploration of the nature of fact, memory, subjectivity and perspective. Areas of study include Personal Essay, Memoir, Blogs and Alternate Forms, the Journal, Historical Inquiry and Social Commentary. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.  Prerequisite: CWL 202

DEC:      G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits

 

CWL 305 Forms of Fiction

S01 Tues/Thur, 10:00A-11:30P (Class # 94804), Rachel Ansong
S02 Wednesdays, 4:00-6:50P (Class # 94805), John Stintzi SOCBEHAV SCI N105S, N113

Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through fiction, with examples from the tradition that illustrate point of view, character development, dialogue, plot, setting, theme, motif, and other elements. Areas of study include Short Story, Novella, The Popular Novel, Graphic Novels and Writing Funny.   Prerequisite: CWL 202

DEC:      G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits

 

CWL 310 Forms of Poetry

S01 Tues/Thur, 11:30A-12:50P (Class # 94806), Jordan Franklin FREY HALL 326
S02 Mon/Fri 1-2:20P (Class # 96670), Tyler Penny
HUMANITIES 3008

Study of the genre through readings, discussion and regular submission of original work. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through poetry, with examples from the tradition of such tools as metaphor and image, sound, line, form, and juxtaposition. Areas of study include Powers of Poetry, Bright Containers: Form & Meter, and Methods & Madness, a study of the philosophical vs. visionary strains in poetry. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.  Prerequisite: CWL 202

DEC:      G
SBC:     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits

 

CWL 315 Forms of Scriptwriting: Playwriting

Thursdays 4:00-6:50 (Class # 94807), Michael Narkunski SOCBEHAV SCI N109

Study of the genre through readings, screenings, discussion and regular submission of original writing for film or theater. Course explores methods for expressing the human condition made available through these collaborative media. Areas of study include Fundamentals of Dramatic Action, Visual Storytelling, Message Movies, Writing the One Act, and Extreme Events. Course may be repeated as the topic changes.  Prerequisite: CWL 202

DEC :     G
SBC :     HFA+, WRTD
3 credits

 

CWL 330 Topics in European Literature for Writers, "Sex, Greed, and Real Estate"

S01 Tues/Thurs 2:30-3:50P (Class # 94810), Megan McAndrew HUMANITIES 2045

A lecture for writers concentrating on one area of European literature, to be announced in the course schedule. The course may examine a historical trend in Western literature from multiple viewpoints, the rise of a specific genre, a social issue expressed in literature, or an issue in literary theory, as, for example, The Russian Novel; Classic Plots; Ibsen, Shaw and the Introduction of Feminism to Great Britain; Political Comedy on the Modern European Stage; and Reading Nature. The emphasis will be on scholarly analysis, but with engagement of student writers. Students may repeat this course as the topic changes. Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course.   Advisory Prerequisite: CWL 190

DEC:      I
SBC:     GLO, HFA+
3 credits

 

CWL 335 Topics in American Literature for Writers

Mondays, 5:30-8:15P (Class #94808), William Ste. Marie FREY 201

A seminar for writers concentrating on one area of American literature, to be announced in the course schedule. The course may examine a contemporary or historical trend in American literature, the rise of a specific genre, a social issue expressed in literature, an issue in literary theory, or any other exploration of American pluralism as, for example, Ethics and the Crime Novel; Varieties of American Humor; Southern Renaissance; and Contemporary Poetry Wars. The emphasis will be on scholarly analysis, but with engagement of student writers. Students may repeat this course as the topic changes.  Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course.  Advisory Prerequisite: CWL 190

DEC:      K
SBC:     HFA+, USA
3 credits

 

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