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Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Review of Academic Personnel

Equity, diversity, and inclusion are core values of Stony Brook University. Contributions to teaching, scholarship, and service that promote equity, diversity, and inclusion are encouraged by the Provost’s office and will be given due recognition by during the academic review process. Further, we recognize that contributions to equity, diversity, and inclusion are important elements in faculty development and achievement and should not be treated as “invisible labor.” Additionally, although consideration of personnel cases by departmental committees, college personnel/promotion and tenure committees, and Deans are performed independently of the Provost's office, we urge these bodies to consider scholarship, teaching, and service activities that promote equity, diversity, and inclusion when evaluating personnel cases.

Below we offer guidance on the ways that SBU faculty may choose to contribute to equity, diversity, and inclusion and designate those contributions in the academic review process. Our guidelines are based on those adopted at other AAU institutions.

  • A separate statement on diversity and inclusion is not required. Candidates may provide their contributions to equity, diversity, and inclusion in their biofiles in the context of describing their contributions to teaching, scholarship, and service. Contributions to equity, diversity, and inclusion should be considered as part of a candidate’s file as a whole and should not function as a “fourth leg” of evaluation.
  • Diversity should be construed broadly.
  • Contributions to equity, diversity, and inclusion may include a broad span of activities; for example:
    • Efforts to advance equitable access to education
    • Public service that addresses the needs of a diverse population
    • Research and scholarship in a scholar’s areas of expertise that highlight inequalities
    • Mentoring and advising of students and faculty members, particularly from underrepresented and underserved populations
    • Encouraging diversity of thought; acknowledging that innovative ideas come from dissimilar teams, cultures, and sources
    • Pedagogical practices and learning theories that create inclusive learning environments and communities
    • Curriculum development that enhances equity, diversity, and inclusion
  • If academic units choose to consider contributions to equity, diversity, and inclusion in their review process, they should consider norms appropriate to their subfield when evaluating personnel cases.