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GLI Summer Courses (2021)

 

Summer I: May 24 - July 3

GLI 391 Humanities and Fine Arts Topics in Globalization Studies

Topic: URBANISM AND DIGITAL NARRATIVES AFTER COVID

Instructor: Phillip Baldwin, Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre

Course Description: 

Cities, by an 'organic economic transformation', are now home to more than half of humanity. Yet, during Covid-19 outbreak, we have seen the wealthier leave the cities for 'the natural periphery', and use telematic forms of communication such as smart phones, high speed internet, and social media to create a 'floating global brain' of employment and connection. What happens to the urban and rural poor, they live next to, and who remains in an 'analog economy' if all viable economies happen 'online'? This is a theory and 'lab' class that is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from fields in the social sciences, the arts, the humanities, architecture, game theory, Virtual/Augmented Reality, tele-medicine, tele-collaboration, social media narrations, engineering, public health, and education. Courses in the program focus on issues in contemporary urban society, 'telematic society', and on the forces and practices that shape urban/rural life, the social structure of urbanism, architecture, design and the way individuals create an online narrative to fit within this 'global brain'.  

Format: Online Asynchronous

Undergraduate | 3 credits 

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. G or HUM course

SBC: GLO; HFA+

 

Summer II: July 5 - August 14

GLI 392 Social and Behavioral Sciences Topics in Globalization Studies

Topic: HUMAN RIGHTS: GLOBAL EXPECTATIONS AND LOCAL CHALLENGES

Instructor: Juliette Passer, international law practitioner, adjunct professor in the Political Science department

Course Description: 

Human rights are a complex issue. Their protection and promotion involve a number of actors: from international organizations to local communities, from governments to civil society. Human rights affect all aspects of our life, as individuals (as women, men, children, refugees, workers…) and as members of a community. This course will analyze the international and domestic laws and institutions that protect the fundamental rights of all human beings and will provide students with critical knowledge concerning the norms, institutions and procedures tasked to promote and protect human rights.

Students will engage with thought-provoking issues that arise at the intersection of human dignity, state sovereignty, and international justice, such as why does the world need human rights; tools for advocating for the vulnerable; moving from exclusion to inclusion: responding to crisis and conflict, human rights and the UN SDGs.

Format: Online Synchronous

Undergraduate | 3 credits 

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. F or SBS course

SBC: GLO; SBS+

Meeting Patterns: MW 6-8:30PM

GLI 212 Issues in Globalization Studies

Topic: GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

Instructor: Sophia Boutilier, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology

Course Description:  

This course introduces students to the concept of intersectionality - how identities like gender, race and class interact to create and sustain inequalities. Students will learn about how race was created and used as a tool of colonialism, and how the legacies of these institutions shape gender and class in the present day. The core text gives an overview of historical and contemporary stereotypes that we will apply to case studies of different global phenomena such as trade and social movements. Upon completion of the course students will have an understanding of intersectionality and be able to apply this perspective to consider the gendered, raced, and classed dimensions of global issues.

Undergraduate | 3 credits 

SBC: GLO; HUM

Format: Online Asynchronous