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Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics


Physical Chemistry is a core discipline whose aims are the understanding and measurement of chemical phenomena in terms of fundamental underlying physical principles, and also the application of this understanding to the development of new technologies and new materials. Physical chemistry typically enjoys and profits from a close coupling of its theoretical and experimental components. With several new faculty members in recent years and a strong connection to Brookhaven National Laboratory and its extraordinary facilities, Physical Chemistry is a vibrant discipline at Stony Brook. Current research interests among the faculty cover a broad range from theoretical statistical mechanics, quantum chemistry and modeling to experimental programs from nuclear chemistry to polymers, materials, surface science, molecular dynamics, and spectroscopy. The optional chemical physics track allows students to focus even more on the fundamental physical aspects of chemistry, and usually includes courses in the physics department applicable to the student’s interest.

 

   
Thomas Allison

Thomas Allison
Associate Professor. Frequency Combs, Photochemistry, Ultrafast molecular dynamics, Nonlinear Optics, and Molecules in intense laser fields

Karena Chapman

Karena Chapman
Professor

Ken A. Dill

Ken A. Dill
Professor. Director of the Laufer Center for Physical & Quantitative Biology. Statistical physics of biological molecules and cells. We model proteins, water, cell networks, dynamics of small systems, and we develop methods for computer-based drug discovery.

Benjamin Hsiao

Benjamin S. Hsiao
Distinguished Professor. Fundamentals of structure, morphology, property and processing relationships in polymers; nanocomposites and biomaterials.

Christopher Johnson

Christopher Johnson
Associate Professor. Molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of mechanisms atmospheric aerosol processes, catalytic intermediates, and combustion. Spectroscopic manifestations of intermolecular interactions. Instrument development.

Roy Lacey

Roy Lacey
Professor. Nuclear Chemistry

Ben Levine

Benjamin G. Levine
IACS Endowed Professor of Chemistry.   Joint with the Institute for Advanced Computational Science. Theory and Simulation of  Electronically Excited Molecules and Materials.

Amy Marschilok

Amy Marschilok
Associate Professor. Materials science and engineering; inorganic chemistry; interfacial electrochemistry; batteries, flow cells, capacitors, liquid and solid electrolytes

Trevor Sears

Trevor Sears
Professor. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species related to combustion chemistry. Sub-Doppler and precision line shape measurements using frequency comb-stabilized lasers.

Esther Takeuchi

Esther Takeuchi
Distinguished Professor. Materials chemistry, physics and engineering; systems based electrochemistry; batteries, flow cells, capacitors, liquid and solid electrolytes

Kenneth Takeuchi

Kenneth Takeuchi
Distinguished Teaching Professor. Inorganic chemistry; materials science and engineering; electrochemistry; batteries, flow cells, capacitors, liquid and solid electrolytes

Jin Wang

Jin Wang
Professor. Theoretical biophysics and biophysical chemistry; protein folding; molecular recognition; biomolecular reaction dynamics; single molecules. Physics and Chemistry of Molecular and Systems Biology, Classical and Quatum Nonequilibrum Statistical Mechanics.

Michael White

Michael White
Professor. Dynamics and mechanisms of chemical reactions on metal and metallic nanoparticle surfaces important in energy-related, heterogeneous catalysis. Photoinduced surface reactions and electron transfer

Stanislaus Wong

Stanislaus S. Wong
Distinguished Professor. Synthesis and characterization of chemically functionalized nanomaterials (including carbon nanotubes and quantum dots) and one-dimensional nanostructures. Physical, chemical, and biological applications of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Biophysical chemistry. Surface chemistry and reactivity. Optical spectroscopy. Probe and electron microscopies.