AEC2016

Prof. Clive R. Clayton

Stony Brook University




Professor Clayton has published more than 200 papers in Aqueous Corrosion, Applied Surface Science and Surface Engineering and has edited 8 conference proceedings and contributed 5 Chapters in books. He is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society and former Chair of the Corrosion Division. Dr Clayton is Director of the Surface Analysis and Corrosion Science Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering at Stony Brook. He developed this facility into one of the premier university surface analytical facilities covering: AES, XPS SIMS and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies. This facility is combined with a fully equipped electrochemical laboratory. His research covers surface modification by ion implantation, thin film development, environmental science speciation studies, microbial influenced corrosion and heavy metal immobilization, aqueous corrosion studies of nano-scale passive films, polymer composites durability and polymeric military coatings for solvent and weathering resistance as well as optical surface properties.

Engineering alloys, such as stainless steels, have generally been designed to withstand chemical attack by inorganic acids and salts. However, the application of these alloys to biologically challenging environments is often problematical, requiring experimental determination of suitability to a specific type of environment. This issue is particularly important to the selection of materials for construction of advanced biodigesters and associated fittings. In this brief paper the authors review some of the challenges to corrosion resistance that engineering alloys face in the construction of biodigesters drawing upon their previous experience in the developing field of Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC). Emphasis will be placed upon types 304 and 317 Stainless Steels as they are relatively low cost and are a starting point before consideration of the higher cost high alloyed super-austenistics and duplex stainless steels.

Presentation: Fundamental Challenges to Stainless Steels in Biodigester Environments



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