ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

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Undergraduate: Journalism

  • Program Overview

    Journalism (JRN)

    As innovative, digital technology accelerates the dissemination of news, information, and disinformation around the clock and around the world, the need for well-trained and independent-minded journalists has never been greater.

    The journalism major program at Stony Brook is designed to prepare the next generation of journalists for careers in broadcast journalism, print journalism, and online journalism-and a combination of all three. 

    The course of study will emphasize both traditional journalistic values and skills, and the ability to succeed in a rapidly evolving multi-media landscape. Students will study news reporting, writing, editing, and producing. They will develop an appreciation for the mission of the press in a democratic society, standards of ethical and responsible journalism, and will be expected to leave the program with a passion for the public interest and the courage to do the right thing in the face of unprecedented competition.

    To prepare for the future, all students will be required to take courses in broadcast, print, and online journalism, learning to work and think across multiple media platforms, before concentrating in an area during their final year of study. Students will have the opportunity to do reporting assignments both on Long Island and in New York City.

    In addition, students will be required to either declare a second major or complete six courses in one of four multi-disciplinary concentrations outside the journalism major. This requirement is designed to help prepare students to report insightfully in the future. The four multi-disciplinary concentrations include Public Affairs/Public Policy, Diversity and American Society, Science and the Environment, and Global Issues and Perspectives.

    The journalism minor is designed for students who seek an appreciation for the mission of the press, an understanding of journalistic principles, and a desire to improve critical thinking and writing skills.

    All students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies or journalism advisor to design and approve an acceptable course of study.

  • Degrees and Requirements

     

    Requirements for the Major and Minor in Journalism (JRN)

    Transfer students

    Transfer students may transfer up to 9 credits of equivalent journalism courses in which they have earned a C or better. Transfer courses will be evaluated individually for equivalency by the under­graduate director.

    Requirements for the Major

    The major in journalism leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students must complete each course with a letter grade of C or higher in all JRN courses and Satisfactory in JRN labs for a course or lab to count toward the JRN major. Students must also satisfy the upper-division writing requirement. Completion of the major requires 46 credits in journalism and either six courses in a multi-disciplinary concentration, of which at least three are upper-division courses, or a minor, or a second major. (The option to choose either a multi-disciplinary concentration or a minor is retroactive and open to all majors.) To satisfy all requirements, a student must earn a minimum of 121 credits to graduate with a degree in journalism, including a minimum of 72 credits outside of JRN-labeled courses.

    Students must complete three developmental phases, with core requirements in each phase. In Phase I, The Fundamentals of Journalism, students will study basic skills and ethics, including news reporting and writing for print and broadcast. In Phase II, The Business of News, students will explore the changes sweeping the journalistic landscape and choose from a menu of upper-division reporting and writing courses. In Phase III, Entry Point into the Profession, students will take advanced courses in either a Visual/Web Track or a Text/Web Track. In addition, students will complete a senior project in their area of specialty and then adapt it for other media.

    Note: Parts of this curriculum take effect in Fall 2013. Students who took JRN 110 before Fall 2013 will continue in that sequence.

    Core Course Requirement

    To maximize students’ knowledge in core areas of great importance to journalists, Journalism majors who matriculated Fall 2015 or later are required to complete the following courses. Higher-level courses in these disciplines may be substituted. (Students can substitute equivalent AP and Transfer courses.)

    • POL 102 Introduction to American Government
    • BUS 115 Introduction to Business  OR  ECO 108 Intro to Economics (Note: Prerequisite for ECO 108 is MAT 122 or MAT 123 or higher-level calculus)
    • MAT 118 or higher level MAT course or AMS 102 or higher level AMS course 

    Grammar and Editing Lab

    To progress in the major and minor program, students must pass a grammar proficiency test as part of JRN 111, a grammar course that is co-requisite with JRN 115. The grammar course includes an eight-week immersion lab in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. In the ninth week, all students take a proficiency test. Those who pass are excused from the lab for the rest of the semester. All other students must continue attending the lab and will be required to take a second test on the last day of class. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. 

    Note: WRT 200 may be used as a substitute for JRN 111 in satisfying the major or minor requirements.

    Note: Not all courses are offered every semester.

    A. Phase I: The Fundamentals of Journalism

    All journalism students should see a departmental advisor. Unless approved by a JRN advisor, students must complete the following courses in this order:

    • JRN 101 News Literacy
    • JRN 108 The History and Future of the American Press
    • JRN 111/JRN 115 Grammar and Editing Lab/News Reporting and Writing I
    • JRN 205 News Reporting and Writing II
    • JRN 215 Intro to Multimedia Skills
    • JRN 220 Media Law

    B. Phase II: Journalism 24/7

    1. Students must complete the following courses, not necessarily in this order:

    • JRN 301 The Business of News
    • JRN 310 Multimedia Newsroom I/Visual
    • JRN 320 Multimedia Newsroom II/Web
    • JRN 340 Beat Reporting
    • JRN 350 Journalistic Judgment and Ethics

    2. Electives for Phase II. Students must choose one course from the following:

    • JRN 333 Business Reporting
    • JRN 334 Science and Health Reporting
    • JRN 335 Reporting in New York City / Print
    • JRN 336 Sports Reporting
    • JRN 337 Intro to Narrative Journalism
    • JRN 355 Reporting in New York City / Broadcast

    C. Phase III: Entry Point into the Profession

    Students complete one of the following two tracks:

    Visual/Web Track: 

    • JRN 370 Advanced Visual Reporting and Storytelling
    • JRN 371 Weekly Broadcast
    • JRN 385 Digital Academy
    • JRN 490 Senior Project
    • Advanced electives available to this group: JRN 364 or JRN 380 or JRN 381

      OR 

    Text/Web Track: 

    • JRN 364 Advanced Reporting
    • JRN 381 Web Presentation
    • JRN 385 Digital Academy
    • JRN 490 Senior Project
    • Advanced electives available to this group: JRN 370 or 380 

    D. Experiential Requirement:

    Students are required to successfully complete at least one experiential course. Choices include JRN 335, JRN 415, JRN 435, JRN 487, JRN 488, and others.

    E. Required JRN Electives

    Students are required to complete the major with elective journalism credits. Students may take any course for which they have the pre- and co-requisites.

    F. Multi-Disciplinary Concentration or Minor

    Majors must complete either six courses in a Multi-Disciplinary Concentration, of which at least three are upper-division courses, or a Minor. The option to choose either a Multi-Disciplinary Concentration or a Minor is retroactive and open to all majors. A concentration or minor is not required of dual majors.

    A Minor is of the major’s choosing. The Minor must be completed.

    For the Multi-Disciplinary Concentration, majors must complete six courses, including three upper-division courses, in one of the following four multi-disciplinary concentrations. Students may substitute a course within a concentration or propose a new concentration with the permission of the undergraduate director. Specific multi-disciplinary concentrations and suggested courses are listed below. A concentration is not required of students who complete a second major.

    The purpose of the Multi-Disciplinary Concentration is to complement the journalistic knowledge and skills that students are developing. These courses, offered by departments around the university, are intended to help students expand their perspective in major areas of importance to journalists.

    Students select one of four concentrations, each of which is designed to add breadth, depth and understanding to their reporting. Students may also may propose their own concentration.

    The four concentrations are:

    • Diversity and American Society
    • Global Issues and Perspectives
    • Public Affairs / Public Policy
    • Science and the Environment

    Majors must take six courses, including at least three upper-division courses, in one of these four concentrations. Students are not restricted to the listed courses, which are the types of survey courses recommended by the School of Journalism.

    Majors may substitute courses that fit the theme of their concentration or propose a different concentration tailored to their interests. Either option requires permission in advance from the Undergraduate Director.

    A concentration is not required for dual majors.

    Please note:

    • Many of these courses also count toward D.E.C. or SBC categories, and students may choose and apply D.E.C. or SBC courses towards the concentration. Courses carry only the assigned number of credits for the course. 
    • Not all courses are offered every semester. Check prerequisites.
    • Concentration courses taken prior to Spring 2013 remain valid. Starting in Spring 2013, concentration courses must come from these revised lists or be approved by the Undergraduate Director.

    The multidisciplinary concentrations are as follows (complete 6 courses in any one area):

    Science and the Environment

    Students study trends, acquire foundation knowledge, and get multiple perspectives on science and environmental issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. At least three of the courses must be 300 or above. Note: Not all courses are offered every semester. Some have prerequisites.

      • ATM 102 Weather and Climate (also as EST 102)
      • ATM 237 Topics in World Climate/Atmosphere (Individual Topics need approval) (also as PHY 237-H)
      • BIO 103 Intro to Biotech
      • BIO 113 General Ecology
      • BIO 115 E Evolution and Society
      • BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology Organisms to Ecosystems
      • BIO 353 Marine Ecology
      • BIO 358 Biology and Human Social and Sexual Behavior
      • BIO 386 Ecosystem Ecology and the Global Environment (also as ENS 311)
      • CHE 115 Chemistry, Life and Environment (also as ENV 115)
      • ECO 373 Economics of Environment and Natural Resources
      • ENS 101 Prospects for Earth
      • ENS 301 Contemporary Environmental Issues and Policies
      • ENS 311 Ecosystem Ecology and the Global Environment (also as BIO 386)
      • ENS 312 Population, Technology and the Environment
      • ENS 333 Environmental Law (also as POL 333)
      • ENV 115 Chemistry, Life and Environment (also as CHE 115)
      • EST 102 Weather and Climate (also as ATM 102)
      • EST 201 Technological Trends in Society
      • EST 291 Energy, Environment, and People
      • EST 330 Natural Disasters Societal Impacts
      • GEO 101 Environmental Geology
      • GEO 102 The Earth
      • GEO 103 The Earth Through Time
      • GEO 107 Natural Hazards
      • GEO 304 Energy, Mineral Resources & Environment
      • GEO 305 Field Geology
      • GEO 311 Geoscience and Global Concerns
      • GEO 313 Understanding Water Resources for the 21st Century
      • HIS 365 Environmental History of North America
      • HIS 399 Topics in U.S. History (Individual Topics need approval)
      • MAR 101 Long Island Sound Science and Use
      • MAR 104 Oceanography
      • MAR 340 Environmental Problems and Solutions
      • PHI 366 Philosophy of the Environment
      • PHY 113 Physics of Sports
      • PHY 237 Topics in World Climate/Atmosphere (Individual Topics need approval) (also as ATM 237)
      • POL 333 Environmental Law (also as ENS 333)
      • SBC 111 Introduction to Sustainability Studies
      • SOC 315 Sociology of Technology
      • SOC 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction (also as WST 340)
      • SOC 344 Environmental Sociology
      • WST 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction (also as SOC 340)

    Diversity and American Society

    Students study trends and acquire knowledge, insights, historical context, and multiple perspectives on important societal issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. At least three of the courses must be 300 or above. Note: Not all courses are offered every semester. Some have prerequisites.

      • AAS 102 Eastern Religions (also as RLS 102 )
      • AAS 250 Language and Culture of Asian Americans (also as LIN 250)
      • AAS 280 Islam (also as RLS 280)
      • AAS 334 English in Asia
      • AAS 338 Contemporary India History, Politics & Diplomacy (also as POL 338)
      • AFH 382 ​Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora (also as EGL 382 and WST 382)
      • AFS 277 The Modern Color Line (also as HIS 277)
      • AFS 310 American Attitudes Toward Race
      • AFS 319 The Politics of Race
      • AFS 325 The Civil Rights Movement (also as HIS 325)
      • AFS 350 Black Women and Social Change A Cross-Cultural Perspective (also as WST 350)
      • AFS 363 Blacks and Mass Media
      • AFS 394 Black Nationalism in America
      • AMR 102 Making American Identities
      • AMR 301 Ethnicity and Race in American History
      • ANT 203 Native Peoples of North America
      • CLT 235 American Pluralism in Film and Literature
      • ECO 316 U.S. Class Structure and Its Implications
      • EGL 382 ​Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora (also as AFH 382 and WST 382)
      • EST 330 Natural Disasters Societal Impacts and Technological Solutions
      • HIS 277 The Modern Color Line (also as AFS 277)
      • HIS 325 Civil Rights Movement (also as AFS 325)
      • HIS 362 Making Peace with the 60s
      • HIS 368 Wealth and Inequality in the Modern Corporate Age
      • HIS 373 History of Crime & Criminal Justice in U.S.
      • HIS 396 ​Topics in U.S. History (Individual Topics need approval)
      • HUI 336 Italian Americans and Ethnic Relations
      • LIN 101 Intro to Linguistics
      • LIN 200 ​Language in the United States
      • LIN 250 Language and Culture of Asian Americans (also as AAS 250)
      • PHI 105 Politics and Society
      • PHI 383 Philosophical Issues of Race and Gender (III) (also as WST 383)
      • POL 101 World Politics
      • POL 102 Introduction to American Government
      • POL 320 Constitutional Law and Politics United States
      • POL 330 Gender Issues in the Law (also as WST 330)
      • RLS 101 Western Religions
      • RLS 102 Eastern Religions (also as AAS 102)
      • RLS 280 Islam (also as AAS 280)
      • SOC 105 Intro to Sociology
      • SOC 204 Intimate Relationships
      • SOC 243 ​Sociology of Youth
      • SOC 247 Sociology of Gender (also as WST 247)
      • SOC 248 Social Problems in Global Perspective
      • SOC 302 American Society
      • SOC 303 Social Inequality
      • SOC 304 Sociology of Family
      • SOC 310 Ethnic and Race Relations
      • SOC 315 Sociology of Technology
      • SOC 330 Media and Society
      • SOC 336 Social Change
      • SOC 337 Social Deviance
      • SOC 338 Sociology of Crime
      • SOC 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction
      • SOC 348 Global Sociology
      • SOC 378 War and the Military
      • SOC 380 Social Psychology
      • SOC 390 Special Topics (Individual Topics need approval)
      • WST 102 Intro to Women’s Studies in the Social Sciences
      • WST 103 Women, Culture and Difference
      • WST 247 Sociology of Gender (also as SOC 247)
      • WST 310 Contemporary Feminist Issues
      • WST 330 Gender Issues in the Law (also as POL 330)
      • WST 335 Women at Work in 20th Century America
      • WST 347 Women and Politics (also as POL 347)
      • WST 350 Black Women and Social Change A Cross-Cultural Perspective (also as AFS 350)
      • WST 382 Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora (also as AFH 382 and EGL 382)
      • WST 383 Philosophical Issues of Race and Gender (III) (also as PHI 383)
      • WST 399 Topics in Gender and Sexuality (Individual Topics need approval)

    Public Affairs/Public Policy 

    Students study trends, acquire knowledge and historical context, and gain multiple perspectives on public policy issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. At least three of the courses must be 300 or above. Note: Not all courses are offered every semester. Some have prerequisites.

      • ATM 102 Weather and Climate (also as EST 102 )
      • AFS 325 Civil Rights Movement (also as HIS 325)
      • AFS 339 ​Recent African American History (also as HIS 339)
      • AMR 102 American Identities
      • ATM 102 Weather and Climate (also as EST 102)
      • ANT 310 Ethnography
      • BUS 348 Principles of Marketing
      • ECO 108 Intro to Economics
      • ECO 303 Intermediate Microeconomics Theory
      • ECO 305 Intermediate Macroeconomics Theory
      • ECO 360 Money and Banking
      • ENS 333 Environmental Law (also as POL 333)
      • EST 102 Weather and Climate (also as ATM 102 )
      • EST 201 Technological Trends in Society
      • EST 330 Natural Disasters Societal Impacts
      • GEO 105 Energy Resources for the 21st Century
      • HIS 104 United States Since 1877
      • HIS 325 Civil Rights Movement (also as AFS 325)
      • HIS 333 Women in U.S. History (also as WST 333)
      • HIS 339 Recent African American History (also as AFS 339)
      • HIS 378 War and the Military (also as SOC 378)
      • HIS 396 Topics in U.S. History (Individual Topics need approval)
      • HUI 236 Italian American Scene
      • HUR 249 Russia Today
      • LIN 200 Language in the United States
      • MAR 340 Environmental Problems and Solutions
      • PHI 105 Politics and Society
      • PHY 113 Physics of Sports
      • POL 101 World Politics
      • POL 102 Intro to American Government
      • POL 103 Intro to Comparative Politics
      • POL 309 Politics in the European Union
      • POL 317 American Election Campaigns
      • POL 318 Voters and Elections
      • POL 319 Business Law
      • POL 320 Constitutional Law and Politics United States
      • POL 322 The Presidency
      • POL 323 U.S. Congress
      • POL 324 American Political Parties & Pressure Groups
      • POL 325 Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
      • POL 327 Urban Politics
      • POL 332 Politics of Criminal Due Process
      • POL 333 Environmental Law (also as ENS 333)
      • POL 336 U.S. Foreign Policy
      • POL 346 Political Psychology
      • POL 359 Public Policy Analysis
      • POL 367 Mass Media in American Politics
      • SOC 105 ​ Introduction to Sociology
      • SOC 200 Medicine and Society
      • SOC 247 Sociology of Gender (also as WST 247)
      • SOC 302 American Society
      • SOC 336 Social Change
      • SOC 337 Social Deviance
      • SOC 338 Sociology of Crime
      • SOC 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction (also as WST 340)
      • SOC 378 War and the Military (also as HIS 378)
      • SOC 386 ​State and Society in the Middle East
      • WST 333 Women in U.S. History (also as HIS 333)
      • WST 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction (also as SOC 340)
      • WST 247 Sociology of Gender (also as SOC 247)

    Global Issues and Perspectives

    Students study trends, acquire knowledge and historical context, and gain multiple perspectives on global issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. At least three of the courses must be 300 or above. Note: Not all courses are offered every semester. Some have prerequisites. 

      • AAS 201 Intro to Civilization of the Indian Subcontinent
      • AAS 216 Introduction of Japanese Studies
      • AAS 250 Language and Culture of Asian Americans (also as LIN 250)
      • AAS 280 Islam (also as RLS 280)
      • AAS 372 Family, Marriage, Kinship – China (also as ANT 372)
      • AFH 339 Arts of the African Diaspora (also as ARH 329)
      • AFH 390 Issues in Africana Studies (Individual Topics need approval)
      • AFS 221 Modern African History (also as HIS 221)
      • AFS 240 Issues in Caribbean Society
      • AFS 319 The Politics of Race
      • AFS 337 Politics of Africa (also as POL 337)
      • AFS 346 Political and Social History of Africa (also as HIS 346)
      • AFS 350 Black Women and Social Change A Cross-Cultural Perspective (also as WST 350)
      • AFS 365 Global Africa (also as SOC 365)
      • AFS 375 Slavery
      • AMR 101 Local and Global National Boundaries, World Systems
      • ANT 250 African Peoples and Cultures
      • ANT 372 Family, Marriage, Kinship – China (also as AAS 372)
      • ARH 329 Arts of the African Diaspora (also as AFH 339)
      • ATM 237 World Climate and Atmosphere (also as PHY 237)
      • EST 330 Natural Disasters Societal Impacts
      • EUR 101 Foundations of European Culture
      • GEO 101 Environmental Geology
      • GEO 311 Geoscience & Global Concerns
      • HIS 102 Modern European History 1789-1945
      • HIS 214 Modern Latin America (also as POL 214)
      • HIS 221 Modern African History (also as AFS 221)
      • HIS 227 Islamic Civilization
      • HIS 281 Global History & Geography
      • HIS 341 20th Century China
      • HIS 346 Political and Social History of Africa (also as AFS 346)
      • HIS 353 ​Postwar Japan
      • HIS 378 War and the Military (also as SOC 378)
      • HIS 393 Topics in Modern European History (Individual Topics need approval)
      • HIS 397 U.S. Immigration & Ethnicity
      • HUF 219 Modern France
      • HUI 239 Modern Italy
      • HUI 336 Italian Americans and Ethnic Relations
      • HUI 338 Images of Italian Americans in Film
      • HUR 249 Russia Today
      • HUS 254 Latin America Today
      • HUS 255 Modern Spain
      • LIN 250 Language and Culture of Asian Americans (also as AAS 250)
      • PHY 237 World Climate and Atmosphere (also as ATM 237)
      • POL 101 World Politics
      • POL 103 Intro to Comparative Politics
      • POL 214 Modern Latin America (also as HIS 214)
      • POL 309 Politics in the European Union
      • POL 310 Immigration and Refugee Politics
      • POL 311 Introduction to International Law
      • POL 313 Problems / International Relations
      • POL 336 U.S. Foreign Policy
      • POL 337 Politics of Africa (also as AFS 337)
      • POL 338 Contemporary India History, Politics, Diplomacy (also as AAS 338)
      • POL 350 Contemporary European Political Theory
      • POL 374 Global Issues in the United Nations (also as SOC 374)
      • RLS 280 Islam (also as AAS 280)
      • SOC 105 Intro to Sociology
      • SOC 248 Social Problems in Global Perspectives
      • SOC 348 Global Sociology
      • SOC 364 ​Sociology of Latin America
      • SOC 365 Intro to African Society (also as AFS 365)
      • SOC 374 Global Issues in the UN (also as POL 374)
      • SOC 378 ​War and the Military (also as HIS 378)
      • SOC 386  State and Society in the Middle East
      • WST 301 Histories of Feminism
      • WST 350 ​Black Women and Social Change A Cross-Cultural Perspective (also as AFS 350)

    G. Upper-Division Writing Requirement

    All students majoring in Journalism must submit two samples of their journalism course work (longer articles, term papers, case studies, or independent research projects) along with the instructor's written confirmation that the work demonstrates suitably advanced writing proficiency, in JRN 490 Senior Project. If this evaluation is satisfactory, the student will have fulfilled the upper-division writing requirement. If it is not, the student must fulfill the requirement before graduation.

    Students should consult with the department advisor to ensure that their plan for completing the Upper Division Writing Requirement is consistent with  university graduation requirements for General Education.  Students completing the Stony Brook Curriculum (SBC) must complete a course that satisfies the "Write Effectively within One's Discipline" (WRTD) learning objective to graduate.  The Upper Division Writing Requirement is consistent in most cases with the SBC learning outcomes for WRTD.

    Requirements for the Minor

    The journalism minor emphasizes knowledge and exposure to basic skills for students who seek an understanding of broadcast, online, and print media but who are not necessarily planning careers in journalism or intending to major in journalism. Courses in the minor provide students with a broad introduction to journalistic principles and practices as well as an understanding of the role of journalism in society. This program will be useful to students who are interested in sharpening their information-gathering and analytical skills, improving the speed and clarity of their writing, and improving their ability to communicate in whatever career they pursue.

    Eighteen credits are required for the Minor in Journalism. Courses must be passed with a C or higher in all JRN courses and Satisfactory in JRN labs for a course or lab to count toward the JRN minor. Students are required to complete at least six credits of elective journalism courses at 200 or above to complete the minor in Journalism.

    See a Journalism advisor. Prerequisites will be enforced.

    Note: Parts of this curriculum take effect in Fall 2013. Students who took JRN 110 before Fall 2013 will continue in that sequence.

    Grammar and Editing Lab

    To progress in the minor program, students must pass a grammar proficiency test as part of  JRN 111, a grammar course that is co-requisite with  JRN 115. The grammar course includes an eight-week immersion lab in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. In about the ninth week, all students take a proficiency test. Those who pass are excused from the lab for the rest of the semester. All other students must continue attending the lab and will be required to take a second test on the last day of class. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. 

    Note:  WRT 200  may be used as a substitute for  JRN 111  in satisfying the major or minor requirements.

    A. Courses required of all minors (13 credits):

    • JRN 101 News Literacy
    • JRN 108  The History and Future of the American Press
    • JRN 115/111 News Reporting and Writing I/Grammar and Editing Lab
    • JRN 205  News Reporting and Writing II

    B. Elective courses (6 credits): 

    • Choose one of the following courses (3 credits):

      • JRN 390 Special Topics: Issues in Contemporary Journalism
        OR  
      • SOC 330 Media and Society
        OR  
      • POL 367 Mass Media in American Politics

    • and one of the two following groups of courses (3 credits):

      • JRN 215 Introduction to Multimedia Skills
        and
      • JRN 301 The Business of News   

        OR

      • JRN 215 Introduction to Multimedia Skills
        and
      • JRN 220 Media Law

    Minors are welcome to take additional courses beyond these, but should consult with the Undergraduate Director.

     

     

     

  • Sequence

    Sample Course Sequence for the Major in Journalism

    A course planning guide for this major may be found hereThe major course planning guides are not part of the official Undergraduate Bulletin, and are only updated periodically for use as an advising tool. The Undergraduate Bulletin supersedes any errors or omissions in the major course planning guides.  

    FRESHMAN

    FALL Credits
    First Year Seminar 101 1
    WRT 102 3
    JRN 101   or  JRN 103
    3
    MAT (QPS)**** 3
    SBC
    3
    SBC
     3
     Total 16
     
    SPRING Credits
    First Year Seminar 102 1
    JRN 108 3
    JRN 115 and  JRN 111 * 4
    ECO 108
    4
    SBC 3
     Total 15
     
    SOPHOMORE

    FALL Credits
    JRN 210 / JRN 211  or 205/215 3 or 4
    JRN 220 2
    Multidisciplinary concentration*** 3
    SBC 3
    SBC  3
     Total 14-15
     
    SPRING Credits
    JRN 301 2
    JRN 310 **    3
    Multidisciplinary concentration***  3
    SBC  3
    SBC 3
    SBC  3
     Total 17
     
    JUNIOR

    FALL Credits
    JRN 320 ** 3
    JRN 350 3
    JRN 333 ,  JRN 334 ,  JRN 336 , or JRN 337 3
    Multidisciplinary concentration***  3
    Elective  3
     Total 15
     
    SPRING Credits
    JRN 364   or JRN 370** 3
    JRN 340 3
    JRN Experiential (any late semester)  3
    Multidisciplinary concentration*** 3
    Elective 3
     Total 15
     
    SENIOR

    FALL Credits
    JRN 371   or  JRN 381 **  3
    JRN 385  1
    Multidisciplinary concentration***
     3
    Elective  3
    Elective  3
     SBC  3
     Total 16
     
    SPRING Credits
    JRN 490 3
    Multidisciplinary concentration***  3
    Elective   3 
    Elective  3
    SBC  3
       
     Total 15

     NOTE: The sample course sequence is meant to be used as a example. Please consult a Journalism advisor to help plan a course schedule.

    Parts of this curriculum take effect in Fall 2013. Students who took JRN 110 before Fall 2013 will continue in that sequence.

    *Students are required to pass 111 to progress in JRN skills courses.

    **These courses follow a sequence (e.g.  JRN 370   and  JRN 371 ). See Bulletin course descriptions for specifics.

    ***Or courses that count toward a minor or second major.

    ****Choose from among the following: AMS 102, MAT 118 or any higher AMS or MAT course.

     

     

     

     

  • Contact

    Journalism (JRN)

    Major and Minor in Journalism

    School of Journalism

    Dean: Dr. Laura Lindenfeld

    Director of Undergraduate Studies: Irene Virag

    Office: Melville Library N-4004

    Phone: (631) 632-7403

    Web address: http://www.stonybrook.edu/journalism  

     

     

     

     

  • Courses
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