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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

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Undergraduate: Journalism

  • Program Overview

    Journalism (JRN)

    The state-of-the-art accredited journalism program at Stony Brook University is designed to prepare students for careers in today’s fast-paced, highly competitive media landscape. The streamlined curriculum requires 42 credits, including 39 credits of JRN courses. and offers an easy-to-navigate pathway to graduation. 

    The program is based on digital journalism but holds fast to traditional journalistic values and skills that imbue an understanding of the role of the press in a democratic society and a passion for the public interest. The school’s mission is to nurture the next generation of well-trained, independent-minded journalists with the courage to do the right thing in the face of unprecedented pressure. The curriculum also provides the intellectual underpinnings students need to progress to graduate or professional degree programs. 

    It is designed to ensure that students build competencies in a sequential fashion. They will hone skills in journalistic storytelling and production, starting with two required digital journalism courses and a writing course. In turn, these prepare students for one of three upper-level digital journalism courses – specializing in text, audio or video, depending on their interests and ambitions. These courses offer advanced opportunities to mix sound, images and words into compelling multimedia packages. Students will also practice using social media as a reportorial tool and a presentation platform. Majors complete their production training in the senior capstone course, JRN 490, which satisfies the university’s experiential learning requirement. 

    The remaining required coursework provides a rich variety of challenging courses that explore news literacy, media law and ethics, mass communication history, the economics of media, global issues in journalism and data-driven storytelling. Students must also take one three-credit journalism elective. 

    In addition, an 18-credit interdisciplinary concentration will provide students with an in-depth look at a specific academic area of their choosing. Students have the option of pursuing a minor or double major. 

    Through these experiences, journalism majors should develop into ethical, well-educated, well-spoken, resourceful, independent critical thinkers who understand the technical, cultural and intellectual challenges facing modern media.

     

     

     

  • Degrees and Requirements

    Requirements for the Major and Minor in Journalism (JRN)

    Transfer students

    Transfer courses will be evaluated individually for journalism equivalency by the Undergraduate Director.

    Requirements for the Major

    The major in journalism leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students must earn a letter grade of C or higher in all courses required for the major and Satisfactory or S in JRN internships, independent studies and workshops for these to count toward the major. Journalism majors must satisfy all Stony Brook Curriculum (SBC) requirements and accrue a total of 120 credits. Completion of the major requires a total of 42 credits, including 39 credits in journalism.

    Students may design an 18-credit interdisciplinary concentration in an academic subject of their choosing. Consult the undergraduate director to discuss an interdisciplinary concentration. Nine credits, or three classes, of the 18 credits required of all concentrations must be at the upper-division level. Students may also select one of four pre-designed concentrations created to
    explore broad topics – Public Affairs/Public Policy, Diversity and American Society, Global Issues and Perspectives, and Science and The Environment. Check prerequisites. Many of these courses also count toward SBC categories. They also count toward the minimum of 72 non-journalism credits all majors must complete. This is a standard set by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications  (ACEJMC), the school’s accrediting body. Stony Brook’s School of Journalism is the only accredited journalism degree program in the SUNY system.

    All journalism students should see a departmental advisor to plan their course programs. The following courses are required of all journalism majors; an asterisk denotes an online course:

    1. Required courses (36 credits):

    • JRN 101 News Literacy*
    • JRN 106 Introduction to Mass Media
    • JRN 116 Introduction to Digital Journalism
    • JRN 208 History of Mass Communication
    • JRN 216 Intermediate Digital Journalism
    • JRN 217 Journalistic Reporting and Writing (this course can be taken before, after or in the same semester as JRN 216)
    • JRN 301 The Business of News
    • JRN 303 Global Issues in Journalism
    • JRN 305 Mass Communication Law and Ethics*
    • POL 102 Introduction to American Government

    Choose one of the following advanced skills courses before moving on to 400-level required  courses (JRN 415 and JRN 490):

    • JRN 311 Advanced Digital Journalism – Text
    • JRN 312 Advanced Digital Journalism – Audio
    • JRN 313 Advanced Digital Journalism – Video

    After completing JRN 311, 312, or 313, all majors must complete the following 400-level required courses:

    • JRN 415 Data Analysis and Storytelling
    • JRN 490 Senior Capstone Project (satisfies EXP+ and WRTD)

    2. Required JRN Elective (3 credits):

    Students must complete one three-credit upper-division elective. Junior or Senior standing is required. Not all electives will be offered every semester. If students opt to take a variable credit course to complete their elective requirement, a minimum of 3 credits must be selected. Students should consult their major advisor before enrollment for the semester begins.

    Students can choose one course from the following electives:

    3. Upper-Division Writing Requirement

    Successful completion of JRN 490  Senior Capstone Project  will satisfy the SBC WRTD requirement as well as the Journalism major upper-division writing requirement.  

    Students should consult with the department advisor to ensure that their plan for completing the Upper Division Writing Requirement is consistent with  university graduation requirements for General Education. Students completing the Stony Brook Curriculum (SBC) must complete a course that satisfies the "Write Effectively within One's Discipline" (WRTD) learning objective to graduate.  The Upper Division Writing Requirement is consistent in most cases with the SBC learning outcomes for WRTD.

    4. Concentration in Outside Area

    Students must declare a second major, a minor, or an interdisciplinary concentration.

    Students may design an 18-credit interdisciplinary concentration in an academic subject of their choosing. Consult the undergraduate director to discuss an interdisciplinary concentration. Nine credits, or three classes, of the 18 credits required of all concentrations must be at the upper-division level. Students may also select one of four pre-designed concentrations created to
    explore broad topics – Public Affairs/Public Policy, Diversity and American Society, Global Issues and Perspectives, and Science and The Environment. 

    The pre-designed interdisciplinary concentrations are as follows (complete 6 courses in any one area).

    Science and the Environment

    Students study trends, acquire foundation knowledge, and get multiple perspectives on science and environmental issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites.

    • ATM 102  Weather and Climate (also as  EST 102)
    • ATM 237  Topics in World Climate/Atmosphere (Individual Topics need approval) (also as  PHY 237)
    • BIO 103  Intro to Biotech
    • BIO 113  General Ecology
    • BIO 115  Evolution and Society
    • BIO 201  Fundamentals of Biology Organisms to Ecosystems
    • BIO 353  Marine Ecology
    • BIO 358  Biology and Human Social and Sexual Behavior
    • BIO 386  Ecosystem Ecology and the Global Environment (also as  ENS 311)
    • CHE 115  Chemistry, Life and Environment (also as  ENV 115)
    • ECO 373  Economics of Environment and Natural Resources
    • ENS 101  Prospects for Earth
    • ENS 301  Contemporary Environmental Issues and Policies
    • ENS 311  Ecosystem Ecology and the Global Environment (also as  BIO 386)
    • ENS 312  Population, Technology and the Environment
    • ENS 333  Environmental Law (also as  POL 333)
    • ENV 115  Chemistry, Life and Environment (also as  CHE 115)
    • EST 102  Weather and Climate (also as  ATM 102)
    • EST 201  Technological Trends in Society
    • EST 291  Energy, Environment, and People
    • EST 330  Natural Disasters Societal Impacts
    • GEO 101  Environmental Geology
    • GEO 102  The Earth
    • GEO 103  The Earth Through Time
    • GEO 107  Natural Hazards
    • GEO 304  Energy, Mineral Resources & Environment
    • GEO 305  Field Geology
    • GEO 311  Geoscience and Global Concerns
    • GEO 313  Understanding Water Resources for the 21st Century
    • HIS 365  Environmental History of North America
    • HIS 399  Topics in U.S. History (Individual Topics need approval)
    • MAR 101  Long Island Sound Science and Use
    • MAR 104  Oceanography
    • MAR 340  Environmental Problems and Solutions
    • PHI 366  Philosophy of the Environment
    • PHY 113  Physics of Sports
    • PHY 237  Topics in World Climate/Atmosphere (Individual Topics need approval) (also as  ATM 237)
    • POL 333  Environmental Law (also as  ENS 333)
    • SBC 111  Introduction to Sustainability Studies
    • SOC 315  Sociology of Technology
    • SOC 340  Sociology of Human Reproduction (also as  WST 340)
    • SOC 344  Environmental Sociology
    • WST 340  Sociology of Human Reproduction (also as  SOC 340)

    Diversity and American Society

    Students study trends and acquire knowledge, insights, historical context, and multiple perspectives on important societal issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. 

    • AAS 102  Eastern Religions (also as  RLS 102)
    • AAS 250  Language and Culture of Asian Americans (also as  LIN 250)
    • AAS 280  Islam (also as  RLS 280)
    • AAS 334  English in Asia
    • AAS 338  Contemporary India History, Politics & Diplomacy (also as  POL 338)
    • AFH 382  ​Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora (also as  EGL 382  and  WST 382)
    • AFS 277  The Modern Color Line (also as  HIS 277)
    • AFS 310  American Attitudes Toward Race
    • AFS 319  The Politics of Race
    • AFS 325  The Civil Rights Movement (also as  HIS 325)
    • AFS 350  Black Women and Social Change A Cross-Cultural Perspective (also as  WST 350)
    • AFS 363  Blacks and Mass Media
    • AFS 394  Black Nationalism in America
    • AMR 102  Making American Identities
    • AMR 301  Ethnicity and Race in American History
    • ANT 203  Native Peoples of North America
    • CLT 235  American Pluralism in Film and Literature
    • ECO 316 U.S. Class Structure and Its Implications
    • EGL 382  ​Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora (also as  AFH 382  and  WST 382)
    • EST 330  Natural Disasters Societal Impacts and Technological Solutions
    • HIS 277  The Modern Color Line (also as  AFS 277)
    • HIS 325  Civil Rights Movement (also as  AFS 325)
    • HIS 362  Making Peace with the 60s
    • HIS 368  Wealth and Inequality in the Modern Corporate Age
    • HIS 373 History of Crime & Criminal Justice in U.S.
    • HIS 396  ​Topics in U.S. History (Individual Topics need approval)
    • HUI 336  Italian Americans and Ethnic Relations
    • LIN 101  Intro to Linguistics
    • LIN 200  ​Language in the United States
    • LIN 250  Language and Culture of Asian Americans (also as  AAS 250)
    • PHI 105  Politics and Society
    • PHI 383  Philosophical Issues of Race and Gender (III) (also as  WST 383)
    • POL 101  World Politics
    • POL 102  Introduction to American Government
    • POL 320  Constitutional Law and Politics United States
    • POL 330  Gender Issues in the Law (also as  WST 330)
    • RLS 101  Western Religions
    • RLS 102  Eastern Religions (also as  AAS 102)
    • RLS 280  Islam (also as  AAS 280)
    • SOC 105  Intro to Sociology
    • SOC 204  Intimate Relationships
    • SOC 243  ​Sociology of Youth
    • SOC 247  Sociology of Gender (also as  WST 247)
    • SOC 248  Social Problems in Global Perspective
    • SOC 302  American Society
    • SOC 303  Social Inequality
    • SOC 304  Sociology of Family
    • SOC 310   Racism and Ethnic Relations
    • SOC 315  Sociology of Technology
    • SOC 330  Media and Society
    • SOC 336  Social Change
    • SOC 337  Social Deviance
    • SOC 338  Sociology of Crime
    • SOC 340  Sociology of Human Reproduction
    • SOC 348  Global Sociology
    • SOC 378  War and the Military
    • SOC 380  Social Psychology
    • SOC 390  Special Topics (Individual Topics need approval)
    • WST 102  Intro to Women’s Studies in the Social Sciences
    • WST 103  Women, Culture and Difference
    • WST 247  Sociology of Gender (also as  SOC 247)
    • WST 310  Contemporary Feminist Issues
    • WST 330  Gender Issues in the Law (also as  POL 330)
    • WST 335  Women at Work in 20th Century America
    • WST 347  Women and Politics (also as  POL 347)
    • WST 350  Black Women and Social Change A Cross-Cultural Perspective (also as  AFS 350)
    • WST 382  Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora (also as  AFH 382  and  EGL 382)
    • WST 383  Philosophical Issues of Race and Gender (also as  PHI 383)
    • WST 399  Topics in Gender and Sexuality (Individual Topics need approval)

    Public Affairs/Public Policy 

    Students study trends, acquire knowledge and historical context, and gain multiple perspectives on public policy issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. 

    Global Issues and Perspectives

    Students study trends, acquire knowledge and historical context, and gain multiple perspectives on global issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. 

    Requirements for the Minor

    Completion of the minor in Journalism requires 21 credits.  

    1. The following courses (12 credits) are required of minors:

    2. Three journalism electives (9 credits) at or above the 300 level are required. Please check the above list under the requirements for the major for options. Note that students enrolled in the minor may not apply credits from Internship or Independent Study courses to count toward the elective requirement. Electives require U3/U4 status to enroll.

    Minors are welcome to take additional journalism courses, but should consult with the Undergraduate Director.

     

     

     

     

  • Sequence

    Sample Course Sequence for the Major in Journalism

    A course planning guide for this major may be found hereThe major course planning guides are not part of the official Undergraduate Bulletin, and are only updated periodically for use as an advising tool. The Undergraduate Bulletin supersedes any errors or omissions in the major course planning guides.  

    FRESHMAN

    FALL Credits
    First Year Seminar 101 1
    WRT 102 3
    JRN 101
    3
    SBC 3
    SBC
    3
    SBC
     3
     Total 16
     
    SPRING Credits
    First Year Seminar 102 1
    JRN 106 3
    JRN 116 3
    POL 102
    3
    SBC 3
    SBC 3
     Total 16
     
    SOPHOMORE

    FALL Credits
    JRN 208 3
    JRN 216 3
    Interdisciplinary concentration** 3
    SBC 3
    SBC  3
     Total 15
     
    SPRING Credits
    JRN 217 3
    Interdisciplinary  concentration**  3
    SBC  3
    SBC  3
    SBC 3
     Total 15
     
    JUNIOR

    FALL Credits
    JRN 301 3
    JRN 305* 3
    JRN 311, 312, OR 312 3
    Interdisciplinary 
    concentration**
     3
    SBC  3
     Total 15
     
    SPRING Credits
    JRN 303 3
    Interdisciplinary  concentration** 3
    Upper-division JRN elective 3
    SBC 3
    SBC 3
     Total 15
     
    SENIOR

    FALL Credits
    JRN 415  3
    Interdisciplinary 
    concentration**
     3
    SBC  3
    SBC  3
    SBC  3
    Total 15
     
    SPRING Credits
    JRN 490 3
    Interdisciplinary 
    concentration**
     3
    SBC   3 
    SBC  3
    SBC  3
     Total 15

    NOTE: The sample course sequence is meant to be used as a example. Please consult a Journalism advisor to help plan a course schedule.

    *Denotes an online course.

    **Denotes courses for the required concentration or courses that count toward a minor or second major. Concentrations require 18 credits or six courses. Some minors and most second majors may require more credits. Please see an advisor.

     

     

     

     

  • Contact

    Journalism (JRN)

    Major and Minor in Journalism

    School of Journalism

    Dean: Dr. Laura Lindenfeld

    Director of Undergraduate Studies: Irene Virag

    Office: Melville Library N-4004

    Phone: (631) 632-7403

    Website: http://www.stonybrook.edu/journalism  

     

     

     

     

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