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Undergraduate: Engineering Science

  • Program Overview

    Engineering Science (ESG)

    The Department of Materials Sci­ence and Engineering offers the Bachelor of Engineering degree program in Engineering Science and several interdisciplinary undergraduate programs in conjunction with other science and engineering departments on campus. The joint programs provide basic training for graduates to enter a wide range of industries or to proceed to graduate studies in engineering fields. They are aimed at the materials aspect of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, phy­sics, and chemistry. Engineering Science students can choose to specialize in biotechnology, manufacturing engineering, electronics engineering, materials science and engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering, nanoscale engineering, and engineering management. Reflecting the breadth and variety of topics falling within the domain of engineering science, the De­partment also offers seven minors that afford undergraduate students the opportunity to enhance their engineering or science studies with knowledge in a specific area. In addition to the minor in Materials Science, the Department offers minors in Biomaterials; Electronic, Optical, and Magnetic Materials; Energy Science, Technology and Policy; Manufacturing Engineering; Environmental Engineering; and Nanotechnology Studies. Each is detailed under a separate heading in the alphabetical listings of Approved Majors, Minors, and Programs.

    The program mission is aimed toward providing an engineering education which thoroughly covers fundamental aspects of engineering design, physical and chemical sciences, mathematics, and materials science and engineering, while also providing flexibility so that students can create a program tailored to their particular academic and career interests in a traditional or emerging discipline. The program is designed to provide core competency and skills in communication, design, and research while preparing students to participate in a rapidly evolving high-technology environment.

    Program Educational Objectives

    Graduates of the ESG program will:

    • Meet or exceed expectations of employers in engineering or science-related disciplines or pursue advanced studies if so desired.
    • Assume/undertake leadership roles in their communities and/or professions. 

    Student Outcomes

    Students who graduate from the ESG program should possess the following skill sets:

    a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
    b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
    c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
    d. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
    e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
    f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
    g. an ability to communicate effectively;
    h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
    i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life long learning;
    j. a knowledge of contemporary issues; and
    k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

    In addition to preparation for graduate study in engineering and materials science, the program in Engineering Science prepares students for a variety of employment opportunities as it is particularly suited to the nature of modern manufacturing processes in industry as well as to scientific institutions and laboratories. Throughout the curriculum, students develop skills needed to participate in the research experience and are encouraged to become involved in the many state-of-the-art research facilities associated with the Department, including world-class laboratories in polymer engineering, thermal spray research, surface science and engineering, nanotechnology, semiconductor materials and crystal growth, and environmental materials engineering. Graduates of the program, trained to understand the materials and forces of nature and to apply that knowledge to practical problem solving, occupy engineering, scientific, and management positions in development, manufacturing, and marketing in major corporations in areas including communications, computing, and aerospace. Small and medium-sized companies also rely on the expertise of materials scientists in design and manufacturing.
    In addition, some graduates apply their knowledge to patent law and consulting. About ten percent of the program’s graduates pursue advanced degrees in engineering research as well as in law, business, and medicine.

    The program in Engineering Science is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org

     

  • Degrees and Requirements

    Requirements for the Major in Engineering Science (ESG)

    Acceptance into the Major

    Qualified freshman and transfer students who have indicated their interest in the major on their applications may be admitted directly as a degree major or as a pre-major. Pre-majors are placed into the Area of Interest (AOI) program and to be eligible for the degree, they must be admitted to and declare the major. The requirements and application process for matriculation are detailed below. Students admitted to other programs within the College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) follow the same admissions process as students in the AOI program. Students in programs outside of CEAS (non-CEAS students) and double major applicants may apply for admission to the degree program following a separate process, outlined below.

    Area of Interest and Other CEAS Students (excluding double major applicants)
    Applications for major admission from AOI and other CEAS students are reviewed twice per year and must be received by January 5 for Spring admission and June 5 for Fall admission. Students who submit their application on time will be admitted if they meet the following requirements:

        • A cumulative g.p.a. of 3.00;
        • Earned a g.p.a. of 3.00 or above in all mathematics, physics, and chemistry courses with no more than one grade in the C             range;
        • Received completed course evaluations for all transferred courses that are to be used to meet requirements for the major.

    Students must complete these requirements no later than one year after they enroll in the first course that applies towards major entry. Students must apply for admission by the application deadline immediately following completion of the above requirements, but no later than the one year limit. Admission of AOI students and other CEAS students who apply late will follow the process of Non-CEAS Students and Double Major Applicants below.

    Non-CEAS Students and Double Major Applicants
    Applications for major admission from non-CEAS students and double major applicants are reviewed twice per year and must be received by January 5 for Spring admission and June 5 for Fall admission. Students who do not meet the requirements for AOI admission above will not be considered. Fulfilling the requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Admission is competitive and contingent upon program capacity.

    Requirements for the Major

    The major in Engineering Science leads to the Bachelor of Engineering degree.

    Completion of the major requires ap­proximately 108 credits, in addition to any credits needed for Stony Brook Curriculum (SBC) and other University requirements.

    A. Core

    1. Mathematics

    • AMS 151, AMS 161; AMS 261 or MAT 203; AMS 361 or MAT 303

    Note: The following alternate calculus course sequences may be substituted for AMS 151, AMS 161 in major requirements or prerequisites: MAT 125, MAT 126, MAT 127; or MAT 131, MAT 132; or MAT 141, MAT 142; or MAT 171.

    2.  Natural Sciences

    • PHY 131/PHY 133 and PHY 132/PHY 134; PHY 251/PHY 252 or ESG 281; CHE 131/133, CHE 132/134

    Notes:
    a. The following alternate physics course sequences may be substituted for PHY 131/PHY 133, PHY 132/PHY 134: PHY 125, PHY 126, PHY 127, PHY 133, PHY134 Classical Physics A, B, C and Laboratories or PHY 141, PHY 142, PHY 133, PHY 134 Classical Physics I, II: Honors
    b. The following alternate chemistry course sequence may be substituted for CHE 131/133, CHE 132/134: CHE 152 Molecular Science I and CHE 154 Molecular Science Laboratory I

    3. Computer Science

    • ESG 111 or CSE 114 

    4. Engineering Science

    • ESG 100; ESG 201; ESG 312; ESG 375; ESG 420; ESM 450; ESM 460; and the following eight courses:
    • Materials Science and Engineering: ESG 302 or CME 304, ESG 332, ESG 333
    • Electrical Engineering and Electronic Properties: ESE 271
    • Mechanical Engineering and Properties: MEC 260, MEC 363, ESM 335
    • Environmental Engineering: ESM 212

    5. Engineering Synthesis and Design

    • ESG 316, ESG 440, ESG 441; ESM 455

    B. Engineering Specialization and Technical Electives

    The area of specialization, composed of four technical electives, must be declared in writing by the end of the junior year. The area of specialization should be chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor to ensure a cohesive course sequence with depth at the upper level.

    The eight areas of specialization are biotechnology, civil engineering, environmental engineering, electronics engineering, materials science and engineering, mechanical and manufacturing engineering, nanoscale engineering, and engineering management.

    C. Upper-Division Writing Requirement: ESG 300 Writing in Engineering Science

    All degree candidates must demonstrate skill in written English at a level acceptable for Engineering Science majors. The Engineering Science student must register for the writing course ESG 300 concurrently with ESG 312. The quality of writing in the technical reports submitted for ESG 312 is evaluated and students whose writing does not meet the required standard are referred for remedial help. Detailed guidelines are provided by the Department. If the standard of writing is judged acceptable, the student receives an S grade for ESG 300, thereby satisfying the requirement.

    Grading

    All courses taken to satisfy Require­ments A and B above must be taken for a letter grade. A grade of C or higher is required in the following courses (or their equivalents):

    1. AMS 151, AMS 161, AMS 261, AMS 361 or equivalents; PHY 131/133 and PHY 132/134 or equivalents; CHE 131/133 and CHE 132/134 or equivalents; ESG 100; MEC 260; ESG 302 or equivalents; ESG 312, ESG 332, ESG 440 and ESG 441.

    2. Each of the four required technical electives offered by the college

    Areas of Specialization

    Each area of specialization requires four elective courses above those used toward Requirement A, Core. Other technical electives may be substituted only with the approval of the undergraduate program director.

    Biotechnology

    Biotechnology involves the application of various engineering disciplines to biomedical problems, requiring a sound understanding of an engineering discipline coupled with principles of biology and biomaterials. Students utilize elective courses to learn the fundamentals of biology and bioengineering.

    1. The following two courses must be completed:

    a. BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
    b. ESM 453 Biomaterials

    2. Two courses from the following list:

    • ESM 469 Polymer Engineering
    • BIO 203 Fundamentals of Biology: Cellular and  Organ Physiology
    • BIO 328 Mammalian Physiology
    • BIO 334 Principles of Neurobiology
    • BME 304 Genetic Engineering
    • BME 354 Advanced Biomaterials
    • BME 381 Nanofabrication in Biomedical Applications
    • BME 402 Contemporary Biotechnology
    • BME 404 Essentials of Tissue Engineering
    • BME 430 Engineering Approaches to Drug Delivery
    • BME 481 Biosensors
    • ESM 488 or ESM 499 (See Note)

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used ONCE as a technical elective.

    Civil Engineering

    Civil engineering entails the study, research, and design of infrastructure or processes responding to societal needs for sustainable development, transportation, or energy production and delivery.

    1. Three required courses:

    a. GEO 102 The Earth
    b. GEO 112 Physical Geology Laboratory 
    c. CIV 310 Structural Engineering

    2. Two technical electives chosen from the following:

    • ARH 205 Introduction to Architecture
    • CIV 210 Land Surveying
    • CIV 305 Transportation Systems Analysis I
    • CIV 407 Transportation Economics
    • CSE 391 Solid Modeling Special Topics (Solid Modeling topic only)
    • MEC 442 Intro to Experimental Stress Analysis
    • MEC 455 Applied Stress Analysis
    • EST 330 Natural Disasters
    • EST 392 Engineering Economics     
    • GEO 312 Structure & Prop of Materials
    • ECO 373  Eco of Env & Natural Resources
    • MAR 392 Waste Management Issues    
    • MAR 393 Waste Treatment Tech
    • MEC 262 Dynamics
    • ESM 488/489   See Note*

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used ONCE as a technical elective.

    Environmental Engineering

    1. Two required courses:

    • BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology
    • CHE 312 Physical Chemistry Short Course (or CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I)

    2. Two technical electives chosen from:

    • ATM 205 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences
    • ATM 247 Atmospheric Structure and Analysis
    • ATM 305-E Global Atmospheric Change
    • ATM 345 Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Dynamics
    • ATM 348 Atmospheric Physics
    • ATM 397 Air Pollution and its Control
    • CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II
    • CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE 361 Nuclear Chemistry
    • CHE 362 Nuclear Chemistry Laboratory
    • ECO 373 Economics of Environment and Natural Resources
    • ESG 301 Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens
    • ESM 336 Electronic Materials
    • ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other                       departmental independent research with permission of the program director
    • GEO 309 Structural Geology
    • GEO 312 Structure and Properties of Materials
    • GEO 316 Geochemistry of Surficial Processes
    • MAR 301 Environmental Microbiology
    • MAR 308 Principles of Instrumental Analysis
    • MAR 320 Limnology
    • MAR 333 Coastal Oceanography
    • MAR 336 Marine Pollution
    • MAR 340 Environmental Problems and Solutions
    • MAR 385 Principles of Fishery Biology and Management
    • MAR 392 Waste Management Issues
    • MAR 393 Waste Treatment Technologies
    • MAR 394 Environmental Toxicology and Public Health

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits), or other departmental independent research may be used once as a technical elective, with permission of the program director.

    Electronics Engineering

    To achieve an area of specialization in electronics engineering students must fulfill the following requirements:

    1. Two required courses:

    • ESM 336 Electronic Materials
    • ESM 339 Microfabrication and Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials

    2.  Two technical elective courses chosen from the following:

    • ESE 218 Digital Systems Design
    • ESE 304 Applications of Operational Amplifiers
    • ESE 311 Analog Integrated Circuits
    • ESE 315 Control System Design
    • ESE 325 Modern Sensors
    • ESE 330 Integrated Electronics
    • ESE 372 Electronics
    • ESE 373 RF Electronics for Wireless Communications
    • ESM 488/499 See Notes below
    • MEC 456 Introduction to Mechanics of Composites
    • MEC 457 Engineering Composites Fabrication and Characterization

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used ONCE as a technical elective.

    Materials Science and Engineering

    This specialization provides the opportunity for in-depth study of the relationship between performance-properties-processing in materials engineering and its applications.

    1. Two required courses:

    • ESM 336 Electronic Materials
    • ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structure of Solids

    2. Two technical elective courses chosen from the following:

    • ESM 213 Introduction to Nanotechnology Studies
    • ESM 339 Microfabrication and Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials
    • ESM 453 Biomaterials
    • ESM 469 Polymer Engineering
    • ESM 400 Nanotechnology and Research
    • ESM 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum
    • ESM 486 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Engineering
    • ESM 488/499 See Notes below.
    • MEC 456 Introduction to Mechanics of Composites
    • MEC 457 Engineering Composites Fabrication and Characterization

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used ONCE as a technical elective.

    Manufacturing Engineering

    This specialization addresses the rapidly changing technology in the mechanical engineering and manufacturing industries that requires a highly educated workforce with knowledge of mechanical properties of materials, materials processing, design, thermodynamics, statistics, and analysis.

    1. Two required courses:

    • MEC 262 Dynamics
    • MEC 310 Machine Design

    2. Two technical elective courses chosen from the following:

    • AMS 310 Survey of Probability and Statistics
    • ESM 339 Microfabrication and Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials
    • ESM 486 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Engineering
    • MEC 325 Manufacturing Processes
    • MEC 410 Design of Machine Elements
    • MEC 411 Control System Analysis and Design
    • MEC 442 Introduction to Experimental Stress Analysis
    • MEC 455 Applied Stress Analysis
    • MEC 457 Engineering Composites Fabrication & Characterization
    • ESM 488/499 See Notes below.

    Note: Other upper level MEC coursework (completed with a grade of C or higher) may be counted as technical electives with permission of the ESG Undergraduate Program Director.

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research may be used once as a technical elective with permission of the program director.

    Nanoscale Engineering

    The creation of functional materials and devices which involve controllable processes and transformations at the scale of billionths of a meter promises to become a major focus of future efforts in both engineering and scientific research. With a thorough background in materials science, engineering design, and surface and molecular chemistry and devices, this specialization prepares students for graduate study, as well as professional positions in materials and process engineering and research and development.

    1. Two required courses:

    • ESM 213 Introduction to Nanotechonology Studies
    • ESM 336 Electronic Materials

    2. Two technical elective courses chosen from the following:

    • ESM 339 Microfabrication and Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials
    • ESM 469 Polymer Engineering
    • CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I
    • CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II
    • CHE 312 Physical Chemistry
    • CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE 322 Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE 345 Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry
    • CHE 351 Quantum Chemistry
    • CHE 378 Materials Chemistry
    • BME 381 Nanofabrication in Biomedical Applications
    • ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structures of Solids
    • ESM 453 Biomaterials
    • ESM 400 Nanotechnology and Research
    • ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (see Notes below)

    Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research may be used once as a technical elective with permission of the program director.

    Engineering Management

    Strong engineering skills alone are not sufficient to guarantee professional success in today's global economy. Industry requires that engineers also understand the business side of the organization, helping to ensure that products are quickly developed, brought to market and meet the ever increasing needs of the consumer. An Engineering Management specialization degree offered through the Department of Materials Science and Engineering will help prepare students to become effective leaders in the expanding global marketplace by equipping them with thorough technical as well as business skills. To achieve an area of specialization in engineering management, students must fulfill the following requirements:

    1. Two required courses:

    • EST 392 Engineering Economics
    • EST 326 Management for Engineers

    2. Two technical elective courses chosen from the following:

    • AMS 310 Survey of Probability and Statistics
    • ACC 210 Financial Accounting
    • BUS 330 Principles of Finance
    • BUS 340 Information Systems in Management
    • BUS 348 Principles of Marketing
    • EST 305 Applications Software for Information Management
    • EST 327 Marketing for Engineers
    • EST 391 Technology Assessment
    • EST 393 Project Management
    • ESM 486 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Engineering
    • ISE 330 Information Management

    Engineering Chemistry

    The Engineering Chemistry major com­bines work in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Department of Chemistry and leads to the Bachelor of Science degree, awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences. See the major entry for additional information.

    Physics of Materials

    Physics majors may wish to pursue a career in engineering physics, particularly in the application of solid-state physics to materials science and engineering. After taking five courses in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, the student may become eligible for the master's degree program. See the physics major entry for additional information.

    Bachelor of Engineering Degree/Master of Science Degree Program

    An engineering science student may apply at the beginning of the junior year for admission to this special program, which leads to a Bachelor of Engineering degree at the end of the fourth year and a Master of Science degree at the end of the fifth year. In the junior year, the student takes ESM 460, which is normally taken in the senior year, instead of ESM 335. In the senior year, a student takes ESM 513, to use in lieu of ESM 335, in the fall and another graduate course in the spring. In the fifth year, the student takes 24 credits. The advantage of this program over the regular M.S. program is that a student may start his or her M.S. in the senior year, and that he or she needs only 24 credits in the fifth year as opposed to 30 credits for a regular M.S. student. For details of the M.S. degree requirements, see the graduate program director.

     

     

     

     

  • Sequence

    Sample Course Sequence for the Major in Engineering Science

    A course planning guide for this major may be found hereThe major course planning guides are not part of the official Undergraduate Bulletin, and are only updated periodically for use as an advising tool. The Undergraduate Bulletin supersedes any errors or omissions in the major course planning guides.  

    FRESHMAN

    FALL Credits
     First Year Seminar 101 1
    WRT 102 (WRT) 3
    ESG 100  3
    AMS 151 (QPS)
    3
    PHY 131, 133 (SNW) 4
    SBC 3
    Total 17
     
    SPRING Credits
     First Year Seminar 102 1
     AMS 161 3
     ESG 111
    3
     ESG 201 (STAS) 3
     PHY 132, 134 (SNW)  4
     SBC 3
     Total  17
     
    SOPHOMORE

    FALL Credits
    AMS 261 4
    CHE 131/133 5
     ESG 281 3
     ESE 271  3
     Total  15
     
    SPRING Credits
    AMS 361  4
    CHE 132/134 5
    ESG 302
     3
    SBC
     3
     Total 15
     
    JUNIOR

    FALL Credits
    ESG 312
     4
    ESG 300
     0
    ESG 332
     3
    MEC 260
     3
    SBC  3
    ESM 212 3
     Total 16
     
    SPRING Credits
    ESG 316 4
    ESM 335 3
    MEC 363 3
    Technical Elective # 4
    SBC  3
     Total  17
     
    SENIOR

    FALL Credits
    ESG 375   1
    ESG 440*  3
    ESM 450 (TECH)
     3
    ESG 420
     3
    Technical Elective #  3
    ESG 333  3
     Total 16
     
    SPRING Credits
    ESM 460  3 
    ESM 455 3
    ESG 441*  3 
    Technical Elective #  3
    Technical Elective #  3
      Total  15

     

     

    * Note: This course partially satisfies the following: ESI, CER, SPK, WRTD, SBS+, STEM+, EXP+. For more information contact the CEAS Undergraduate Student Office.

  • Contact

    Engineering Science (ESG)

    Major in Engineering Science

    Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

    Interim Chairperson: Dilip Gersappe

    Undergraduate Program Director: Gary P. Halada

    Undergraduate Program Coordinator Elizabeth McRae

    E-mail: esg_undergradadvising@stonybrook.edu

    Web address: https://www.stonybrook.edu/matscieng/

    Phone: 631-632-4689

    Minors of particular interest to students majoring in Engineering Science: Biomaterials (BES), Energy Science, Technology and Policy (NRG), Environmental Engineering (ENE), Manufacturing Engineering (MFE), Materials Science (ESM), Nanotechnology Studies (NTS).

     

     

     

     

  • Courses
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