Spring 2014 Young Scholars Offerings

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 2014

AAS 212 - G: Asian and Asian American Studies Topics in the Humanities
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM - 5:20 PM
Using methodologies of the Humanities disciplines, such as literature, linguistics, classics, cultural studies, philosophy, religious studies, art history and criticism, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American Studies. Topics may range from Women in Japanese fiction to Mahatma Gandhi's impact on politics and ethics. May be repeated as the topic changes. 3 credits

AAS 280 - J: Islam
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 – 5:20 PM
An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280. 3 credits

AMR 102 - G: Making American Identities
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 7:00 PM-8:20 PM
A chronological representation of some of the ways that the peoples living in the current U.S. have identified themselves collectively as Americans and individually as belonging to distinct groups marked by racial, ethnic, gender, and class differences. Readings include texts of various kinds: historical, fictional, and theoretical. A computer (virtual) classroom is part of the coursework. 3 credits

ANT 210 - F: Sunken Cities and Pirates: The World of Underwater Archaeology
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM-5:20 PM
Explores the variety of underwater archaeological sites found around the world, including submerged Stone Age sites in the Old and New Worlds and sunken cities such as Alexandria, Egypt and Port Royal, Jamaica. The class also treats the development of global seafaring through the study of sunken ships, starting with the Bronze Age in the Mediterranean Sea through Viking age ships in northern Europe and the later Age of Exploration. Methods of underwater excavation and site interpretation based on anthropological theory will also be discussed. 3 credits

ARH 101 - D: Art in Culture from Prehistoric Times to the Age of the Cathedrals, ca. 1400 A.D.
LEC 03 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 PM-6:50 PM
A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from its beginnings in prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are studied both as individual monuments with intrinsic aesthetic appeal and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the particular society in which they were created. 3 credits

ARH 102 - D: Art in Culture from the Early Renaissance, ca.1400, to Postmodernism
LEC 04 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present day. Works of art are studied both as individual monuments with intrinsic aesthetic appeal and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the particular society in which they were created. 3 credits

ARH 102 - D: Art in Culture from the Early Renaissance, ca.1400, to Postmodernism
LEC 03 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 PM- 6:50 PM
A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present day. Works of art are studied both as individual monuments with intrinsic aesthetic appeal and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the particular society in which they were created. 3 credits

ARH 205 - G: Introduction to Architecture
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An introduction to the discipline of architecture through various interpretations of its technological and cultural functions. Focusing on the history of architecture's engagement with engineering, anthropology, sociology, and politics, this course explores changing conceptions of the nature and the task of architecture. 3 credits

ARH 207: Digital Media: History and Theory
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present. This course is offered as ARH 207 and DIA 207. 3 credits

ARS 154 - D: Foundations of Drawing
LAB L04 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 6:50 PM
Fundamentals of drawing using various drawing media and types of paper. Perspective, foreshortening, proportion, anatomy, and basic concepts of drawing are studied. The figure, still life, and landscape are explored as subject matter, and color theory is introduced. 3 credits

ARS 154 - D: Foundations of Drawing
LAB L05 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 6:50 PM
Fundamentals of drawing using various drawing media and types of paper. Perspective, foreshortening, proportion, anatomy, and basic concepts of drawing are studied. The figure, still life, and landscape are explored as subject matter, and color theory is introduced. 3 credits

ARS 205 - D: Foundations: Idea and Form
LAB L01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 6:50 PM
An introduction to the basic building blocks for artistic practice and aesthetic analysis. Projects are organized around themes such as line, plane, volume, color, composition, typography, pattern, scale, narrative, performance, light, sound, and monument. These projects, as well as readings, presentations, and discussions, examine the importance of a changing cultural, environmental, and social context and its impact on meaning and perception in art and visual culture. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. 3 credits

AST 200: Current Astronomical Research at Stony Brook
SEM S01 Wednesday 5:30 PM- 6:30 PM
Seminar designed to introduce students to astronomical research currently underway at Stony Brook. Faculty actively engaged in cutting edge research using facilities such as the Hubble space telescope, the CHANDRA X-Ray Observatory, the Keck and Gemini telescopes, or supercomputers give presentations on their own research. Appropriate for students considering undergraduate research in astronomy as well as students interested in current astronomy. 1 credit

ATM 102 - E: Weather and Climate
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 PM- 6:50 PM
Introduces the nature and causes of common meteorological phenomena, severe weather occurrences, and climatic patterns. Topics include formation and movement of air masses and large-scale storms; techniques for weather prediction; weather satellites; hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms; cloud and precipitation types; the climatic history of the earth; and actual and potential effect of human activities on weather and climate, and of weather and climate on humans. This course is offered as both ATM 102 and EST 102. 3 credits

CCS 101 - B: Introduction to Cinema & Cultural Studies
LAB L01 Tuesday 7:00 PM- 9:00 PM
An examination of mediated images and how they characterize and shape our everyday lives. Students learn how to recognize, read, and analyze visual media (which may include: film, television, advertising, photography, music videos, art, graphic design, machinima, and web-based images) within the social, cultural, and political contexts of cinema and cultural studies. 3 credits

CCS 101 - B: Introduction to Cinema & Cultural Studies
LAB L02 02 Tuesday 7:00 PM- 9:00 PM
An examination of mediated images and how they characterize and shape our everyday lives. Students learn how to recognize, read, and analyze visual media (which may include: film, television, advertising, photography, music videos, art, graphic design, machinima, and web-based images) within the social, cultural, and political contexts of cinema and cultural studies. 3 credits

CCS 202 - D: Film Genres
LAB L01 01 Wednesday 6:00 PM- 8:00 PM
An introduction to the study of film through the examination of multiple genres. Special attention is given to how film deals with issues of race and gender. 3 credits

CCS 206 - D: Cinema History: Post-War-Present
LAB L01 01 Wednesday 6:00 PM- 8:00 PM
An introductory study of cinema history from the post-War period to the present. Emphasis is placed on cinema history within the contexts of: exhibition, audience, regulation, technology, film form, style, and movements, industry, distribution, and select national contributions. 3 credits

CWL 202 - S01 Introduction to Creative Writing: Writing Everything
Offered at Southampton Campus

SEM 01 Wednesday 5:20PM- 8:10PM
Creative writing workshop in multiple genres, from fiction to poetry to scriptwriting, intended to introduce students to the basic tools and terminology of the fine art of creative writing. Participants also read contemporary works, give a public reading, and attend Writers Speak, the Wednesday reading series. This course is offered on the Southampton campus. 3 credits

DAN 102 - D: Intro to World Dance Cultures
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 5:30 PM- 6:50 PM
An introduction to the properties and elements of dance in order to understand and appreciate it in a variety of contexts. Dance is considered as art, recreation, social interaction, and entertainment through investigation of societal attitudes, cultural norms, and creative styles of individuals. Formerly offered as THR 102. Not for credit in addition to THR 102. 3 credits

DIA 207: Digital Media: History and Theory
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present. This course is offered as ARH 207 and DIA 207. 3 credits

EGL 112 - B: World Literature: Modern and Contemporary
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
Offers an introduction to world literature of the modern and contemporary periods, focusing especially on the nineteenth, twentieth, and/or twenty-first centuries. Students will study divergent global literary traditions, including a focus on their relationship to English literature; they will also discuss the histories of cross-cultural contact, colonization, and exchange through which such traditions encountered and shaped each other. 3 credits

FRN 111: Elementary French I
REC R01 01 REC Wednesday
4:00PM - 4:53 PM
LEC 02 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30PM -7:15 PM
An introduction to spoken and written French, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Language Center supplements class work. FRN 111 is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of French in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take FRN 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit in addition to FRN 101. 4 credits

GEO 101 - E: Environmental Geology
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00PM -5:20 PM
Fundamental earth science concepts are used to assess the impact of increasing global population and development on earth's natural resources and also to examine how natural processes affect human activities. Topics include water usage and pollution, soil pollution and erosion, radioactive and solid waste disposal, landslides, stream flooding, coastal erosion, environmental consequences of energy and mineral resource utilization, acid rain, global climate change, and the environment effects on human health. Aspects of environmental geology that are particularly applicable to Long Island and metropolitan New York are emphasized. 3 credits

GRK 122 - S3: Elementary Modern Greek II
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00PM - 5:20 PM
An introduction to spoken and written Modern Greek, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Language Center supplements class work. May not be taken for credit in addition to GRK 101. Prerequisite: GRK 121 3 credits

GRK 222 - S3: Intermediate Modern Greek II
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 2:30 PM - 3:50 PM
Second course in a two-semester intermediate course sequence in the reading and interpretation of a wide variety of selected Modern Greek texts. Completion of grammatical and syntactic points not covered in Intermediate Modern Greek I. Extensive practice in communicative ability.  Prerequisite: GRK 221 3 credits

HUE 269 - I: Topics in Contemporary Slavic Culture
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30PM- 6:50 PM
Analysis and discussion of contemporary cultural topics dealing with Russia or Eastern and East Central Europe. Attention is paid to the historic political, social, aesthetic, and cultural forces out of which contemporary culture has evolved. Recent topics have included the apocalypse in literature; 20th-century Poland; Yugoslavia, past and present. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes. 3 credits

HUF 211 - D: French Cinema
LAB L01 01 Thursday 5:30PM- 6:23 PM
LEC 01 Tuesday 5:30PM- 6:50 PM
Introduction to French films as representative of cinematic art. Films are selected to provide a broad historical perspective and range of the director's concerns. Students are taught methods of reading and analyzing filmic works. All films have English subtitles. 3 credits

HUI 231 - D: Sex and Politics in Italian Cinema
LAB L01 01 Tuesday 4:00PM- 4:53 PM
The cinematic representation of gender, class, and sexual politics in post-World War II Italian films and the relationship of these themes to Italian history, society, and culture are discussed. Films by directors such as Bertolucci, Fellini, and Wertmuller are studied. Readings include selected works of film history, criticism, and theory. 3 credits

ITL 101 - S3: Intensive Elementary Italian
LEC 02 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 PM- 8:20 PM
An intensive course covering the elementary Italian program (ITL 111, 112) in one semester. ITL 101 is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Italian in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take this course without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after any other course in Italian. 6 credits

ITL 111: Elementary Italian I
REC R01 01 Wednesday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM
An introduction to spoken and written Italian, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Selected texts are read. Practice in language laboratory supplements class work. ITL 111 is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Italian in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take ITL 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit in addition to ITL 101. 4 credits

JRN 101 - B: News Literacy
LEC 01 Monday 4:00 PM and
REC R03 01 Wednesday 4:00 PM or
REC R04 01 Wednesday 4:00 PM
How do you know if you're getting the truth from the news media? This course is designed to prepare students to become more discriminating news consumers. It will examine standards of reliability and accuracy in news gathering and presentation, and seek to establish the differences between news and propaganda, assertion and verification, bias and fairness, and infotainment and journalism. Students will be encouraged to critically examine news broadcasts, newspaper articles and Web sites. Visiting journalists will be questioned about the journalistic process and decision-making. JRN 101 and JRN 103 are mutually exclusive; JRN 101 cannot be taken for credit in addition to JRN 103 or vice versa. 3 credits

MAT 123 - C: Introduction to Calculus
LEC 03 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM and
REC R08 02 Monday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM or
REC R15 03 Monday 5:30 PM- 6:23 PM
Comprehensive preparation for the regular calculus sequences, with introduction to derivatives. Careful development of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, and their applications. Asymptotics and limits. Linear approximations, slope and derivatives, detailed curve sketching. General modeling examples. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Prerequisite: C or better in MAP 103 or level 3 on the mathematics placement exam (Prerequisite must be met within one year prior to beginning the course.) 3 credits

MAT 125 - C: Calculus A
LEC 03 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM and
REC R02 01 Thursday 4:00 PM 4:53 PM or
REC R09 02 Tuesday 4:00 PM 4:53 PM or
REC R15 03 Wednesday 5:30 PM 6:23 PM or
REC R16 03 Thursday 5:30 PM 6:23 PM
Differential calculus, emphasizing conceptual understanding, computations and applications, for students who have the necessary background from 12th-year high school mathematics. Differentiation of elementary algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; graphing; modeling; and maximization. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 131 or 141 or AMS 151. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Prerequisite: C or higher in MAT 123; or level 4 on the mathematics placement examination; or MAT 122 and coregistration in MAT 130. 3 credits

MAT 126 - C: Calculus B
LEC 03 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM and
REC R18 03 Thursday 4:00 PM 4:53 PM or
REC R02 01 Tuesday 4:00 PM 4:53 PM or
REC R08 02 Tuesday 4:00 PM 4:53 PM or
REC R32 03 Monday 5:30 PM 6:23 PM or
REC R31 03 Wednesday 5:30 PM 6:23 PM
A continuation of MAT 125, covering integral calculus: the fundamental theorem, symbolic and numeric methods of integration, area under a curve, volume, applications such as work and probability, complex numbers. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 142 or AMS 161. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Prerequisite: C or higher in MAT 125 or 131 or 141 or AMS 151 or level 6 on the mathematics placement examination. 3 credits

MAT 127 - C: Calculus C
LEC 02 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
LEC 05 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
A continuation of MAT 126, covering: improper integrals and l'Hospital's rule, sequences, series, Taylor series, differential equations and modeling. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 132, MAT 142, MAT 171, or AMS 161. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Prerequisite: C or higher in MAT 126 or level 8 on the mathematics placement examination. 3 credits

MAT 131 - C: Calculus I
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM and
REC R02 01 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM or
REC R03 01 Tuesday & Thursday 7:00 PM- 7:53 PM
The differential calculus and integral calculus, emphasizing conceptual understanding, computations and applications, for students who have the necessary background from 12th-year high school mathematics. Differentiation of elementary algebraic; trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; graphing; modelling and maximization; the Riemann integral; and the fundamental theorem. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 125 or 141 or AMS 151. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Prerequisite: B or higher in MAT 123, or level 5 on the mathematics placement examination, or B or higher in MAT 122 and concurrent registration for MAT 130. 4 credits

MAT 132 - C: Calculus II
LEC 02 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM and
REC R11 03 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM or
REC R03 01 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM or
REC R06 02 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 PM- 6:23 PM
A continuation of MAT 131, covering symbolic and numeric methods of integration; area under a curve; volume; applications such as work and probability; improper integrals and l'Hospital's rule; complex numbers; sequences; series; Taylor series; differential equations; and modelling. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 127, MAT 142, MAT 171, or AMS 161. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so. Prerequisite: C or higher in AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141, or level 7 on the mathematics placement examination. 4 credits

MAT 200: Logic, Language and Proof
LEC 02 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
A basic course in the logic of mathematics, the construction of proofs and the writing of proofs. The mathematical content is primarily set theory, combinatorics and Euclidean geometry. There is considerable focus on writing. Prerequisites: C or higher in MAT 203, 205 or AMS 261, and in MAT 211 or AMS 210; or A- or higher in MAT 125, 131, 141 or AMS 151; or B- or higher average in MAT 125/126/127, 131/132, 141/142, 171 or AMS 151/161; or permission of instructor. 3 credits

MAT 211: Introduction to Linear Algebra
LEC 02 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
Introduction to the theory of linear algebra with some applications; vectors, vector spaces, bases and dimension, applications to geometry, linear transformations and rank, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, determinants and inner products. May not be taken for credit in addition to AMS 210. Prerequisite: C or higher in AMS 151 or MAT 131 or 141 or coregistration in MAT 126 or level 7 on the mathematics placement examination. 3 credits

MAT 308: Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM and
REC R01 01 Thursday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM
Linear algebra: determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization. Differential equations; existence and uniqueness of solutions. First- and second-order equations; linear versus nonlinear equations. Systems of linear equations. Laplace transform. Applications to physics. More theoretical and intensive than MAT 303, this course is primarily intended for math majors. Together with MAT 307, it forms a 2-semester sequence covering the same material as the 3-semester sequence of MAT 205, MAT 211 and MAT 305. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 303, MAT 305 or AMS 361. Prerequisite: MAT 307 or MAT 205 and MAT 211. 4 credits

MAT 310: Linear Algebra
REC R01 01 Monday 4:00 PM- 4:53 PM
Finite dimensional vector spaces, linear maps, dual spaces, bilinear functions, inner products. Additional topics such as canonical forms, multilinear algebra, numerical linear algebra. Prerequisites: C or higher in MAT 211 or 305 or 308 or AMS 210; C or higher in MAT 200 or permission of instructor. 4 credits

MAT 336 - H: History of Mathematics
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
A survey of the history of mathematics from the beginnings through the 19th century, with special attention to primary sources and to the interactions between culture and mathematics. Emphasis on topics germane to the high school curriculum. Mesopotamian, Egyptian, and Greek mathematics; non-European mathematics; early Renaissance mathematics; the birth and flowering of calculus; the beginnings of probability theory; and the origin of non-euclidean gemetrics and the modern concept of number. Prerequisite: MAT 200 or AMS 301. 3 credits

MAT 342: Applied Complex Analysis
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
Functions of a complex variable, calculus of residues including evaluation of real integrals, power and Laurent series, conformal mappings and applications, Laplace and Cauchy-Riemann equations, the Dirichlet and Neumann problems, and the Laplace and Hilbert transforms and their applications to ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisites: C or higher in the following: MAT 203 or 205 or 307 or AMS 261; MAT 303 or 305 or AMS 361 Advisory Prerequisite: MAT 200. 3 credits

MUS 119 - D: The Elements of Music
LEC 05 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM or
LEC 04 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM or
LEC 06 Monday & Wednesday 5:30 PM- 6:50 PM
Beginning with the rudiments of music, such as meter, tempo, rhythm, and how to read notes in several clefs, this "hands on" course goes on to examine how music is organized, covering scales, keys, intervals, chords, form, and style in classical music. Students also compose throughout the semester and sharpen their listening skills through attendance at concerts. Serves as prerequisite to many music department courses. 3 credits

MUS 261: Stony Brook Chorale
LAB L01 Monday 7:15 PM- 9:45 PM
Study and performance of a repertory from the Middle Ages to the present. Grading is based upon attendance. Ability to read music is required; advanced sight-reading is not. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Audition, held at first class meeting; ability to read music. 1 credit

MUS 262: University Orchestra
LAB L01 Tuesday 6:30 PM- 9:30 PM
Study and performance of works from the repertory of the concert orchestra. Grading is based upon attendance. May be repeated. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Prerequisite: Audition required 1 credit

MUS 263: University Wind Ensemble
LAB L01 Wednesday 7:00 PM- 10:00 PM
Study and performance of works for ensembles of woodwinds, brass, and percussion in various combinations. Grading is based upon attendance. May be repeated. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Prerequisite: Audition required 1 credit

MUS 264: Big Band Jazz Ensemble
LAB L01 Monday 7:00 PM- 10:00 PM
Study and performance of works for jazz ensemble. Grading is based on attendance. May be repeated. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Prerequisite: Audition required. 1 credit

PHI 100 - B: Concepts of the Person (II)
LEC 02 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM or
LEC 03 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An historical introduction to philosophy through readings and discussion on topics such as human identity, human understanding, and human values. 3 credits

PHI 104 - B: Moral Reasoning (II)
LEC 02 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM or
LEC 04 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An introduction to philosophy through inquiry into the formation, justification, and evaluation of moral judgments. Students are introduced to the major theories and problems of ethics, such as utilitarianism, Kant's categorical imperative, ethical relativism, egoism, and classical conceptions of the good and virtue. Against this background students engage in discussions of contemporary moral issues. 3 credits

POL 102 - F & 4: Introduction to American Government
LEC 03 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
What the informed citizen and specialist should know about the organization of American government, including the Constitution and what it means today, the Congress, political parties, pressure groups, growth of the Presidency, the Supreme Court, judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and the Bill of Rights. May not be taken for credit in addition to POL 105. 3 credits

PSY 103 - F: Introduction to Psychology
LEC 01 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An introduction to research and theory in psychology in such areas as learning, perception, cognition, biopsychology, development, personality, and abnormal and social psychology. As part of the course, students must participate in experiments and/or a library research project. 3 credits

RLS 280 - J: Islam
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00 PM- 5:20 PM
An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280. 3 credits

SPN 111: Elementary Spanish I
REC R91 91 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00PM - 5:20 PM
An introduction to spoken and written Spanish, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Language laboratory supplements class work. Intended for students without any prior knowledge of the language, or those with a High School Regents score of less than 74. All entering students who have not taken the Regents exam should take a placement exam to evaluate their proficiency. Please see https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information. 4 credits

THR 101 - D: Introduction to Theatre Arts
LEC 01 Monday & Wednesday 4:00PM -5:20 PM or
LEC 03 Tuesday & Thursday 4:00PM -5:20 PM or
LEC 04 Monday & Wednesday 5:30PM -6:50 PM or
LEC 02 Tuesday & Thursday 5:30PM -6:50 PM
An overview of performance, design, and production in the theatre. Specific texts are explored through lectures, demonstrations, and a close examination of the rehearsal process. Professionals working in the theatre are invited to speak on such topics as stage management, technical production, and direction. Not for theatre arts major credit. 3 credits

THR 105 - D: Acting I
LEC 03 Monday & Wednesday 3:00PM -5:00 PM
LEC 05 Monday & Wednesday 4:00PM -6:00 PM
The basic vocabulary and skills of the actor's craft. Students explore acting techniques through theatre games and improvisation. 3 credits

THR 277: The Media Industry
LEC 01 Tuesday 5:30PM -8:30 PM
A seminar in which the interlocking structure of media production firms, advertising agencies, sponsors, broadcasters, and cable and satellite operators is examined. Among the many political and social issues arising from the making and distribution of media that are considered is the effect of this structure on a democratic society's need for a free exchange of opinion and information. 3 credits