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YAWP Fourth Annual High School Playwrights Festival Dec. 8

Six short plays written and performed by local high school students will be presented at Stony Brook Southampton's Avram Theater on Saturday, December 8, 2012 at 7 p.m. as the culminating event of the 2012 Young American Writers Project (YAWP) High School Playwriting Program. Playwrights for the fall festival were drawn from YAWP classes at Bridgehampton High School, Sag Harbor's Pierson, Southampton, Eastport South Manor, and Westhampton Beach.

A playwright from Ward Melville High School who participated in the YAWP summer program at the Stony Brook Southampton campus will also have his play produced as part of the festival, using actors and crew from the YAWP class at Eastport South Manor.

The festival represents the collaboration between student playwrights, actors and designers who have been taught and mentored by theater and writing professionals affiliated with Stony Brook Southampton's MFA in Creative Writing and Literature, which created and sponsors the YAWP programs. Professional directors stage the plays, which encompass a wide array of genres— from comedies to dramas—with subject matter drawn from the students' own lives.

The Young American Writers Project is dedicated to mentoring middle and high school students in the development of creative expression and critical thinking through writing, and is an integral part of Stony Brook Southampton’s commitment to its community, and to the next generation of readers and writers. The YAWP programs send professional writers and teaching artists into classrooms to lead workshops in a wide range of writing disciplines, including Playwriting, Screenwriting, Poetry, Personal Essay and Fiction.

Over 100 students participated in the inaugural YAWP High School Playwriting Residency this fall. Over the course of two months, students explored the basic elements of dramatic writing: how to develop ideas, characters, themes, dialogue and scenes. One play from each participating class was then selected for production in the Festival. Due to Hurricane Sandy, the annual week-long Playwriting Retreat program, which typically generates four to six additional plays for the festival, had to be postponed.

The Young American Writers Project is helmed by Executive Director Emma Walton Hamilton and Program Director Will Chandler. Ms. Hamilton is a bestselling children's book author, editor and arts educator and serves as director of the Southampton Children's Literature Conference.  A co-founder of Bay Street Theatre, she served as the theatre's co-artistic director, and subsequently director of education and programming for young audiences for 17 years.  Mr. Chandler, an American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) Nicholl Fellowship screenwriter, also served as education director and as a teaching artist for Bay Street Theatre. He has written a number of screenplays for clients ranging from Sony Pictures to actor Russell Crowe and has been a story analyst/script doctor for ABC, CBS, NBC, Viacom and HBO, among others.

"Dramatic writing and production skills give young people unparalleled lessons in communication and collaboration," Ms. Hamilton said. "They build confidence, and have a direct impact on young people’s abilities to become engaged and compassionate citizens in later life. This project represents a wonderful synergy between all the creative disciplines and values about which we are passionate."

"When we go into schools, we work closely with classroom teachers as we convey the basic elements of dramatic writing," Mr. Chandler added. "Learning dramatic writing is a great way to improve overall writing skills, but what we’re really teaching them is that each student has a ‘voice,’ and we want to hear it."

For ongoing curriculum development and program design, the YAWP administrators draw on the substantial strengths of the Stony Brook Southampton MFA faculty, including novelist and MFA Director Robert Reeves; recent Whiting Award-winning poet Julie Sheehan; best-selling memoirist and editor-in-chief of The Southampton Review, Lou Ann Walker; and screenwriter and Emmy award-winning producer Annette Handley Chandler.

"The YAWP programs are a wonderful way for us to reach—and to help shape— the next generation of American writers," said Reeves, "as well as an ideal way to offer training and teaching experience to our very talented graduates and graduate students."

The YAWP Playwriting Festival takes place December 8 at 7 p.m. at the Avram Theater, in the Fine Arts Building on the campus of Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Old Montauk Highway, Southampton.  Tickets for the performance are free. For reservations and more information, email william.chandler@stonybrook.edu

YAWP program expands, will now include visual arts
High school plays at Avram December 8

yawp visual arts

Emma Walton Hamilton, the executive director of the Young American Writers Project (YAWP) educational outreach to high schools and middle schools offered by the Stony Brook Southampton graduate arts campus, has announced the expansion of the program this year to include the visual arts.

Artist Scott Sandell of Sag Harbor, who has been spearheading the introduction of visual arts to the array of offerings at the graduate arts campus, is working with Pierson Middle/High School teacher Peter Solow to introduce a print-making program for Pierson students at the campus from November 27 to 29.

"Over the summer we had 10 artists come through the new Almost Beachfront Print Studio," Sandell said recently. "Each artist worked one-on-one with me to create original prints using our wide-format digital printers. While there were some very traditional print editions created, there were also some artists books, and mixed media works. It's a very exciting moment in printmaking, as new technologies are redefining the idea of what a print is."

"Our pilot program in the visual arts," he continued, "will invite 10 talented students from Sag Harbor's Pierson High School to the Almost Beachfront Studio, where they will have the same opportunity as the professional artists. The students will work with Peter and myself to create large format prints, artists books, and even installation pieces; they will have a chance to define printmaking on their own terms: exciting stuff."

Aside from Sandell's initial lecture on artists books, the students' experience will involve full studio immersion. The young artists, Sandell said, "will walk out dreaming prints."

Work the students create will enhance their college application portfolios, Sandell said, and the three-day intensive in the studio "will provide them with a unique experience, as well as a window into the way professional artists work."

The visual arts pilot program, which is being funded by the Reutershan Trust, is the first of many such visual arts collaborations with different schools planned for YAWP, which Hamilton said will be the acronym, going forward, for the Young Artists and Writers Project.

"YAWP's expansion is a reflection of the expansion of the graduate arts programs at Stony Brook Southampton to include theatre and film MFA degrees as well as visual arts programs," Hamilton said. "There's never been a more important time for the arts, in education and in society," and budget cuts in arts programs, she said, mean that without the scholarship fund, many schools would not be able to take part.

On Saturday, December 8, plays by six high school playwrights from schools across the East End will be presented at the Avram theater at Stony Brook Southampton as the culmination of the YAWP fall playwriting program. Last year's plays included one by an Eastport South Manor student on the negative impact on students' lives of cutting arts programs.

To help make YAWP programs across the board more accessible to more students and schools, a scholarship fund has been created for YAWP and leadership gifts have already been made to the fund by Frank and Theresa Maglio as well as the Rose Family Foundation.

Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr., who has previously gained approval for state funding for YAWP and other educational and cultural East End programs, has announced that he will be sponsoring a line-item appropriation for the 2013 State Budget to support the YAWP Scholarship Fund. Thiele is committed to developing the full potential of educational opportunities at the Southampton campus, and considers the success of YAWP to be a critical part of the educational mandate at the campus. Thiele will be proposing a $75,000 appropriation.

Photo caption: Artist Scott Sandell with Southampton Arts Summer workshop students in the Almost Beachfront Digital Studio. Photo by Star Black)

Author Susan Isaacs at Writers Speak Wednesdays Nov. 28

susan isaacs

New York Times bestselling author Susan Isaacs will be the next guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton, speaking on Wednesday, November 28, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

The renowned Long Island author's newest novel is Goldberg Variations (Scribner, 2012). Popular titles among her 13 novels include: As Husbands Go, Any Place I Hang My Hat, Long Time No See and Compromising Positions. A recipient of the Writers for Writers and John Steinbeck awards, she wrote the screenplay for the 1985 movie adaptation of her 1978 novel, Compromising Positions, and also wrote the screenplay for, and co-produced, the 1987 Touchstone Pictures comedy Hello Again, which starred Shelley Long and Dana Ivey. 

As a Los Angeles Times critic noted in a review of After All These Years, “Susan Isaacs writes wonderful books . . . endlessly entertaining and beautifully written.”

On December 5, the evening will be devoted to readings by “the stars of tomorrow,” students enrolled in the Southampton Arts MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program at the campus.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. All readings begin at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway.

For more information, call 631-632-5030 or visit www.stonybrook.edu/mfa. On Facebook, go to Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

Richard Panek honored with AIP award for science writing

panek

The American Institute of Physics (AIP) has selected Richard Panek, a visiting professor for the Manhattan track of Stony Brook Southampton's MFA in Creative Writing and Literature, as the winner of this year's AIP Science Communication Award in the Science Writing category for his book The 4% Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality.

"The mysteries of cosmology easily capture the imagination," said Catherine O'Riordan, AIP vice president for Physics Resources. "This particular book presents the underlying physics of dark matter and dark energy in a way that draws the reader in and tells an engaging story of researchers at the frontiers of discovery."

Panek will receive a $3,000 honorarium, an inscribed Windsor chair, and a certificate of recognition at the 221st Meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS), to be held Jan. 6-10, 2013, in Long Beach, Calif.

In recent years, a radically new vision of the universe has emerged: Only four percent of it consists of the matter that makes up you, me, and every planet, star, and galaxy. The rest — 96 percent — is completely unknown. Through extensive on-site reporting and hundreds of interviews, Panek offers an intimate, behind-the-scenes portrait of the bitter rivalries and fruitful collaborations, the blind alleys and the eureka moments, that have redefined science and reinvented the universe.

Panek's background is not in science; it's in journalism and fiction. By combining the exploratory sensibility of journalism with the storytelling techniques of fiction, he writes to illuminate and humanize the history and philosophy of science for all readers—especially those who, like himself before he began writing about science, might know little or nothing about the subject. His books have been translated into 14 languages.

Richard Panek, who lives in New York City. has received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (in Science Writing) and the New York Foundation for the Arts (in Literary Nonfiction), as well as an Antarctic Artists and Writers grant from the National Science Foundation. The 4% Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality was long-listed for the 2012 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books.

Panek's books also include The Invisible Century: Einstein, Freud, and the Search for Hidden Universes and Seeing and Believing: How the Telescope Opened Our Eyes and Minds to the Heavens.

The AIP Science Communication Awards aim to promote effective science communication in print and new media in order to improve the general public’s appreciation of physics, astronomy, and allied science fields. The awards are presented at venues that best highlight the science covered in the publications.

The American Institute of Physics (AIP) is an organization of 10 physical science societies, representing more than 135,000 scientists, engineers, and educators. As one of the world’s largest publishers of scientific information in physics, AIP employs innovative publishing technologies and offers publishing services for its Member Societies.
AIP’s suite of publications includes: 15 journals, three of which are published in partnership with other organizations; magazines, including its flagship publication Physics Today; and the AIP Conference Proceedings series. Through its Physics Resources Center, AIP also delivers valuable services and expertise in education and student programs, science communications, government relations, career services for science and engineering professionals, statistical research, industrial outreach, and the history of physics and other sciences.

Patty McCormick’s Never Fall Down named finalist for National Book Award

patty mccormick

Author and Southampton Arts visiting professor Patty McCormick's Never Fall Down has been named a National Book Award finalist in young people's literature for 2012.

Based on the true story of an 11-year-old boy who survived the Khmer Rouge by playing music in the Killing Fields, Never Fall Down came out in May 2012.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu praised the book, saying, "One of the most inspiring and powerful books I've ever read. Never Fall Down can teach us all about finding the courage to speak our truth and change the world."

Following a reading by the finalists on Tuesday,  November 13, at The New School in New York City, the winners will be announced at the annual National Book Awards ceremony hosted by Faith Salie on Wednesday, November 14, at Cipriani Wall Street in New York. At the ceremony, Elmore Leonard and Arthur Sulzberger Jr. will be given lifetime achievement awards by the National Book Foundation.

Bret Anthony Johnston to be interviewed by Dan Menaker for Writers Speak Nov. 14

Bret Anthony Johnston

Bret Anthony Johnston, author of Corpus Christie: Stories and the Director of Creative Writing  at Harvard, will be the next guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton, interviewed by Southampton Arts faculty member Dan Menaker on Wednesday, November 14, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

Corpus Christi: Stories (Random House, 2004) was named a Best Book of the Year by The Independent of London and The Irish Times. In addition, the collection received the Southern Review's Annual Short Fiction Award, the Glasgow Prize for Emerging Writers, the Texas Institute of Letters Debut Fiction Award, the Christopher Isherwood Prize, the James Michener Fellowship, and was shortlisted for Ireland's Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, "the richest short story prize in the world."

His work has appeared in magazines such as EsquireThe Paris ReviewOxford American, and Tin House, and in  a number of anthologies. A graduate of Miami University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he has written essays for The New York Times MagazineThe New York TimesSlate.com and NPR's “All Things Considered,” and he has been a skateboarder for almost 20 years.

Dan Menaker served as the fiction editor for The New Yorker magazine for 22 years before moving to Random House in 1995 as Senior Editor. In 2001 he became Executive Editor at Harper Collins, and then returned to Random House as Executive Editor–in-Chief in 2003. The author of a novel, The Treatment, and two books of short stories, two of which won O. Henry awards, his most recent book is A Good Talk: The Story and Skill of Conversation, published in 2010 by Twelve, an imprint of the Hachette Book Group.   

Renowned Long Island author Susan Isaacs will be the final guest in the series on November 28. On December 5, the evening will be devoted to readings by “the stars of tomorrow”: students enrolled in the Southampton Arts MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. All readings begin at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway.

For more information, call 631-632-5287 or visit www.stonybrook.edu/mfa. On Facebook, go to Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

Frost Medal winner Marilyn Nelson's Writers Speak appearance postponed

m nelson

Due to high winds and seas on Long Island Sound associated with the nor'easter sweeping the New England coast, the reading by poet Marilyn Nelson scheduled for November 7 at Stony Brook Southampton has been indefinitely postponed. 

The MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program, which is sponsoring Nelson's visit as part of the Writers Speak Wednesdays series, will announce the new date for the reading as soon as it has been determined. 

Nelson, the 2012 recipient of the Robert Frost Medal, is the author or translator of 14 books, including The Homeplace (1990) and The Fields of Praise: New and Selected Poems (1997), both of which were finalists for the National Book Award. Her numerous children's books include, Carver: A Life in Poems (2001) which received the Flora Stieglitz Straus Award and the Boston Globe/Horn Book Award. 

Nelson is a professor emerita of English at the University of Connecticut; was founder/director and host of Soul Mountain Retreat, a small non-profit writers' colony (2004-2010), and held the office of Poet Laureate of the State of Connecticut from 2001-2006.

The Frost Medal is presented annually by the poetry society of America for "distinguished lifetime achievement in poetry." Previous winners of the award include Wallace Stevens, Gwendolyn Brooks, Allen Ginsberg, Marianne Moore, and Charles Simic, who was the 2011 recipient.
In a starred review in Kirkus Reviews, The Book of Jonas was described as “rich with symbolism, marvelously descriptive in language ... Dau's novel offers deeply resonating truths about war and culture, about family and loss that only art can reveal. A literary tour de force.”

For more information, call 631-632-5287 or visit www.stonybrook.edu/mfa. On Facebook, go to Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

Anna North Joins Writers Speak Wednesdays on Oct. 24

anna north

Author Anna North will be the next guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton, speaking on Wednesday, October 24, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

North's first novel, America Pacifica, was published by Reagan Arthur Books/Little, Brown. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Glimmer Train, and online at Jezebel.com. She is a senior editor at BuzzFeed.com.    

Other writers scheduled for the series include: poet Marilyn Nelson, November 7; author and Harvard director of creative writing Bret Anthony Johnston interviewed by Dan Menaker, November 14; and renowned Long Island author Susan Isaacs, November 28.

On December 5, the evening will be devoted to readings by “the stars of tomorrow”: students enrolled in the Southampton Arts MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. All readings begin at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway.

For more information, call 631-632-5030 or visit www.stonybrook.edu/mfa. On Facebook, go to Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

James Gleick to be interviewed by Dan Menaker for Writers Speak on Oct. 17

james gleick

Former New York Times reporter James Gleick, author of Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman and Chaos, among other books, will be the next guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings at Stony Brook Southampton, interviewed by Southampton Arts faculty member Dan Menaker on Wednesday, October 17.

Gleick served as the McGraw Distinguished Lecturer at Princeton University in 1989-90, and three of his books have been finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. His most recent best-seller, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood, published in 2011, was described by Philip Ball, a reviewer for The Observer, as ". . . a deeply impressive and rather beautiful book."  

After serving as the fiction editor for The New Yorker magazine for 22 years, Dan Menaker moved to Random House in 1995 as Senior Editor, and in 2001 he became Executive Editor at Harper Collins. He returned to Random House as Executive Editor–in-Chief in 2003. The author of a novel, The Treatment, and two books of short stories, two of which won O. Henry awards, his most recent book is A Good Talk: The Story and Skill of Conversation, published in 2010 by Twelve, an imprint of the Hachette Book Group.  

Other writers scheduled for the series include: novelist Anna North, October 24; poet Marilyn Nelson, November 7; author and director of creative writing at Harvard Bret Anthony Johnston interviewed by Dan Menaker, November 14; and renowned Long Island author Susan Isaacs, November 28. On December 5, the evening will be devoted to readings by “the stars of tomorrow”: students enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. All readings begin at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway.

For more information, call 631-632-5287. On Facebook, go to Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

Poem by Michelle Whittaker Accepted by The New Yorker

whittaker poem

Recent MFA graduate Michelle Whittaker learned in August that she has had a poem accepted by The New Yorker. The poem, "Process," is from her debut manuscript. No date has been given yet for when the poem will be published.

Of Whittaker, poetry editor Paul Muldoon says, "I do think you have a voice all your own and I'm very happy to hear it!"  A Cave Canem Fellow and previous winner of the MFA program's Jody Donohoe Prize, Whittaker teaches introductory creative writing at Stony Brook Southampton, where she earned her MFA in Creative Writing and Literature in June of 2011.

Whittaker is a poet and a pianist. Her research interests include eco-poetics, creative non-fiction, and early-to-late 20th century American and British poetry. Her poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in The Southampton Review, Xanadu, Drunken Boat and Long Island Quarterly. She has received the 2009 Jody Donohue Poetry Prize, a Pushcart Prize honorable mention, and a Cave Canem fellowship.

 

Tracy King-Sanchez screenplay wins grand prize in competition

king sanchez wins

A screenplay by Tracy M. King-Sanchez, who received her MFA in Creative Writing from Stony Brook Southampton in 2012, has been selected as the Grand Prize Winner in the 2012 Women in Film & Video/New England Screenwriting Competition.

Writing about the achievement, 2012 Screenwriting Competition Judge Cheryl Eagan-Donovan noted that "this year's finalists included three great roles for women on screen.  The Grand Prize Winner, Pigeon, features a strong protagonist who overcomes a series of increasingly difficult challenges, and in the process, is transformed into a confident, courageous and compassionate individual.  

"The characters are recognizable but never clichés; each has a mix of admirable traits and realistic flaws. The dialogue is well crafted and the story moves forward quickly and deftly.  The writer has mastered both form and format, taking the reader on a journey into a world where success is not as simple as just getting a college degree. The heroine returns home to learn the meaning of family, friendship, love and responsibility.

"This is a screenplay that is flawless in execution and ready to cast and shoot. Congratulations!" 

As the Grand Prize Winner, King-Sanchez will receive a detailed script analysis and consultation from award-winning screenwriter, Susan Kouguell, founder of Su-City Pictures.  She will also receive a Final Draft software package and a listing on Inktip.com.  

An awards event is planned in October in Boston or Cambridge, Massachusetts.  

Tracy M. King-Sanchez wrote, produced, directed and edited the short film, Artistic Closure, which premiered at the Stony Brook Film Festival and was screened at the Big Apple and Great Lakes Independent Film Festivals.

Her screenplays have placed in other contests, including the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting. Her one-act play, Lifted, was published in TSR: The Southampton Review.

 

elena gorokhhova

Elena Gorokhova interview appears on The Daily Beast

Elena Gorokhova, the author of A Mountain of Crumbs and a participant in the late Frank McCourt’s memoir workshop at the Southampton Writers Conference in 2004, was recently interviewed for the How I Write page of The Daily Beast.

Written up by How I Write contributor Noah Charney, the interview appeared on August 2.

Read the interview here.

 

Gala launch scheduled July 27 for new edition of The Southampton Review

TSR image

The latest edition of TSR The Southampton Review, the literary and art journal published by the Stony Brook Southampton MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program, will be launched at a gala evening on Friday, July 27, starting at 7:30 p.m. in the Avram Theater on the Shinnecock Hills campus.

Two-time U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins and award-winning essayist, memoirist, novelist, and playwright Roger Rosenblatt, both frequent contributors to TSR, will read from their work at the launch. Collins regularly leads summer poetry workshops at Stony Brook Southampton and Rosenblatt is a Distinguished Professor of Writing at the campus, teaching classes in Southampton and Manhattan.

In addition to the customary mix of established and emerging writers and artists, the summer 2012 edition of TSR (Volume VI, No. 2) includes a special Turkana Basin insert with photographs and writing from the MFA program’s January 2012 winter conference at Stony Brook University’s Turkana Basin Institute in Kenya, home base for research by renowned paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey.

"TSR is all about visual art and written language," Editor-in-Chief Lou Ann Walker said, "and since Richard Leakey had been talking about the origins of language while MFA in Creative Writing Director Julie Sheehan was leading a poetry workshop at the institute in January, we decided to do a special insert."

Included in the insert is a long poem by workshop co-leader Bob Holman, the founder of the Bowery Poetry Club and self-described poetry activist. Writing in The NewYorker, HenryLouisGates Jr. called Holman "the postmodern promoter who has done more to bring poetry to cafés and bars than anyone since Ferlinghetti."

Walker said the poem explores "what it's like to write poetry in a place like Turkana," against the backdrop of Richard Leakey talking about his ideas about evolution based on the many fossils he has found there.

The Turkana insert also features poetry by workshop participants Ruth Bonapace and Betsy Bonner, Walker said, "pieces about what it's like to be singing with the people there," as well as "beautiful photographs" by William Westbrook Burford, Christian McLean, and Valerie Scopaz.
Beyond the Turkana insert, Walker said, the latest edition of TSR represents "our usual gorgeous, poignant, sophisticated take through literature and the visual arts," with "about a 10 percent increase in the number of contributors over the last issue."  As she has done for all the previous editions, the editor-in-chief said she has selected contributions by "both accomplished and recognized writers and artists and emerging voices." 

There is an excerpt from Wanderer, the forthcoming memoir by Roger Rosenblatt, and five original poems from Billy Collins. The novelist Ursula Hegi contributed what Walker called "three beautiful poems" on the subject of Alaska.

Among the contributions from emerging voices, Walker mentioned Prison Visit, "a searing short story" by Jen Senft, and "a moving memoir piece" by Mitchell Kriegman titled The Crooked People in the Crazy House. Albert Abonado’s Three Colophons, she said, "have the look of the forward of a book but are actually poems," and Ginny Rosenblatt contributed a "very moving poem" titled March 20.

On the visual arts side, Francine Fleischer of Sag Harbor contributed "five extraordinary photos of swimmers in a mysterious watering hole," Walker said; Massachusetts artist Paul Chojnowski, working with a blow torch on paper and wood, contributed three "quite beautiful" nudes; and Margaret Garrett of Shelter Island submitted three "extremely detailed paintings" from a series titled Tuning Fields.

An emerging artist, Diana Frank of Bridgehampton, contributed some examples of her photographs of water that Walker said "have been blown up on giant pieces of Plexiglass."
Cartoons are always a part of TSR, and the latest edition includes two each from two New Yorker cartoonists, Michael Maslin and Liza Donnelly.

Contributors to the latest edition of TSR will read from their work at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, July 27, in Duke Lecture Hall in the Chancellors Hall building, immediately following an information meeting on the Southampton Arts MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program at Stony Brook Southampton scheduled at 2 p.m.

The gala launch with readings by Roger Rosenblatt and Billy Collins starts at 7:30 p.m. in the Avram Theater in the Fine Arts building and will be followed by a reception. For more information or to register, visit www.stonybrook.edu/avram.   

For more information about TSR The Southampton Review, call 631-632-5030 or email TheSouthamptonReview@stonybrook.edu.

panel for mfa

Shanley, McMullan, Lazaridi and Guirgis discuss character and dialogue with Mangano

On July 11, the opening night of Session I of Southampton Arts Summer at Stony Brook Southampton, Nick Mangano, (above photo, at left) the director of the new MFA in Theatre at the campus, served as the moderator for a craft panel on character and dialogue with, from left: John Patrick Shanley, author of the screenplay for "Moonstruck" and the Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Doubt," among others; celebrated and award-winning children's book author Kate McMullan; Academy Award nominated screenwriter Christina Lazaridi; and playwright, television writer and actor Stephen Adly Guirgis.