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Iryna Klishch Wins the $1,000 Stony Brook Short Fiction Prize

Iryna KlishchThe Stony Brook Southampton MFA in Creative Writing program has announced that Denison University student Iryna Klishch is the winner of the Stony Brook Short Fiction Prize for her short story, "The Feathers of an Addict." Her story was chosen from over 180 submissions from undergraduate students, and has won the $1,000 prize and will be published in The Southampton Review.

Klishch is a junior at Deninson University, and lives in Glenview, Illinois. She is originally from Nadvirna, Ukraine. The first story she remembers writing was when she was five years old, a fairytale: "The Princess Who Ate Too Much Bread." Since, writing stayed with her. "Writing has been, and always will be, my longest and dearest friend," Klishch says.

For her story "The Feathers of an Addict," the inspiration was mysterious. However, Klischch describes her approach to writing as crafting an image in her head: "sometimes I see an image and it sticks with me—blue hands, a sky the color of rotten peaches." Without the intention of form, she sits with this image, and the rest of the story arrives. For her, "The Feathers of an Addict" is a sad story.

Klischch believes that the writer must be foremost honest with himself or herself, and this honesty will carry their story and characters. There is a mystery she finds in writing that must be embraced, not resolved. Her favorite writers are Albert Camus, Anthony Burgess, Emily Brontë, Jane Austen, and Ernest Hemingway.

Her future goals involve traveling, tasting new foods, discovering art and diversity. She considers a future in editing, or even, publishing her own magazine, but she will always be writing.

Congratulations to Iryna Klishch!

 

Ruth Franklin Talks with Susan Scarf Merrell at November 30 Writers Speak

ruth franklinCritic and author Ruth Franklin will be the fifth guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Franklin will read from and talk about her work with author, MFA in Creative Writing faculty member, and Southampton Writers Conference Director Susan Scarf Merrell on Wednesday, November 30, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall, following a brief reception beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Franklin is a film and literary critic who writes for The New Yorker, Harper's, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Review of Books, and Salmagundi as well as many other publications. A former editor at The New Republic, Franklin's first book was A Thousand Darknesses: Truth and Lies in Holocaust Fiction (2011).

Her most recent book, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life, was released in September 2016. A reviewer for The Washington Post called it a "sympathetic and masterful biography that repositions [Jackson] as a major artist whose fiction … channeled women's nightmares and contradictions." Awards and honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Cullman Fellowship at the New York Public Library, a Leon Levy Fellowship in biography, and the Roger Shattuck Prize for Criticism.

susan merrellBooks by the former journalist Susan Scarf Merrell include the nonfiction The Accidental Bond: How Sibling Connections Influence Adult Relationships and two works of fiction, A Member of the Family and SHIRLEY: A Novel.

Franklin will be the final visiting writer of the fall Writers Speak series, which wraps up on December 7 with readings by "the stars of tomorrow," students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @WritersSpeakWed.

Author Lia Purpura Coming to Writers Speak Wednesdays on Nov. 16

lia purpuraAuthor Lia Purpura will be the fourth guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Purpura will read from and talk about her work on Wednesday, November 16, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall, following a brief reception beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Purpura is the author of eight collections of essays, poems, and translations, most recently the poetry collection, It Shouldn't Have Been Beautiful. The collection was named one of the Best Books of 2015 by Baltimore Magazine, which called it "an absolute wonder."

Purpura's work has also appeared in The New Republic, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Ploughshares, among others. Her many honors include three Pushcart Prizes, as well as Guggenheim, NEA, and Fulbright fellowships.

She is a writer in residence at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop in Tacoma, Washington. Purpura lives in Baltimore, MD with her husband and son.

Two guests are scheduled for the November 30 Writers Speak Wednesdays program: Ruth Franklin and Susan Scarf Merrell. On December 7, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, visit Writers Speak on the web or call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @WritersSpeakWed.

 

Flash Fiction Fright Fest at the Windmill on Wednesday, Oct. 26

The "haunted windmill on the hill" is the site of the fifth annual Flash Fiction Fright Fest, happening at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016.

The event, hosted by the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature Program, invites writers to share their scariest, most disturbing tales of terror, featuring 500 or fewer of the most frightening words they can conjure. Refreshments (not people) will be served, and costumes are encouraged.

Those not spinning a thrilling yarn are invited to come along, make friends and eatmeat meet new people.

 

John Knight Talks with Emily Gilbert at Writers Speak Nov. 2

john knightEditor John Knight will talk with Emily Gilbert in the third installment of the 2016 Fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Knight will discuss editing and publishing with Gilbert on Wednesday, November 2, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall, following a brief reception beginning at 6:30 p.m.

John Knight is Associate Editor at Farrar, Straus & Giroux in New York, a firm known for literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and children's books. Previously Knight worked for McSweeney's and The New York Times and wrote for New York Magazine. He also founded and edited the monthly magazine Once, which published international photojournalism and writing.

Emily Gilbert, a creative writing instructor at Stony Brook, is managing editor of TSR: The Southampton Review. She has worked as a journalist and columnist and has published fiction and nonfiction in a number of literary journals. She holds a BA from Bard College and an MFA from Stony Brook Southampton.

Other writers scheduled for the fall series include: Lia Purpura on November 16, and Ruth Franklin and Susan Scarf Merrell on November 30.  

On December 7, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow," students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

Christine Vachon Talks Filmmaking with Montreal's Phi Centre

"A Killer Night: In Conversation with Christine Vachon," was an evening hosted by Guy Maddin at The Phi Centre in Montreal, Quebec. Watch the 2-part interview below:

Part I:

 

Part II:

 

MFA in Film Student Emily Laue Receives New York Women in Film and Television Scholarship  

Stony Brook / Killer MFA in Film student Emily Laue has been selected to receive the New York Women in Film and Television (NYWIFT) Scholarship.

Emily

Laue's scholarship is part of NYWIFT's Scholarship Fund offered to provide financial assistance to second-year women graduate film students based in the New York area.

The $2,500 scholarship awards Emily financial assistance for her film projects while also providing her access to networks and professional development opportunities at NYWIFT.

Read the complete press release >

 

 

Kim Addonizio Kicks Off Writers Speak Following Open House on October 5

addonizioTwo-time Pushcart Prize winner Kim Addonizio will be the first guest in the fall Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Addonizio will read from and talk about her work on Wednesday, October 5, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

This first Writers Speak program for the fall semester on October 5 will be preceded by an Open House and informational session at 5:30 p.m. for prospective MFA in Creative Writing and Literature candidates. Program Director Julie Sheehan and other faculty members will discuss the MFA workshops in fiction, memoir, creative nonfiction, poetry, playwriting, and more, all taught by distinguished working writers.

For those interested in writing books for kids—from picture books and early readers to middle grade and young adult fiction—the Open House will include a presentation on the one-year Children's Lit Fellows program by kids' lit Director Emma Walton Hamilton. Following the presentations and Q & A, prospective students can attend the Writers Speak reception at 6:30 p.m. to meet with current MFA candidates prior to the reading by Kim Addonizio that follows at 7 p.m.

All those interested in attending are asked to email rsvp_mfa@stonybrook.edu.

Kim Addonizio is a poet, novelist, musician and collaborator who teaches and performs internationally. A prolific author, she has six poetry collections, two novels, two story collections, a memoir, and two books on writing poetry to her credit; she has also produced two CDs of music. Her honors include Guggenheim and NEA fellowships and two Pushcart Prizes, and she was a finalist for the National Book Award for her poetry collection, Tell Me.

Recent projects include her newest poetry collection, Mortal Trash (W.W. Norton), released in August 2016, as well as a memoir in essays, Bukowski in a Sundress (Viking/Penguin). Of her latest poetry book, a San Francisco Chronicle reviewer wrote, "Only Kim Addonizio could mix Greek myths with psychopharmacology, Dante with a pinging iPhone, heartbreak with plastic pollution, and create a rare cocktail of wit and desire." Addonizio resides in Oakland, California, and New York City.

Other writers scheduled for the fall series include: Dani Shapiro, October 19; John Knight in conversation with Emily Gilbert, November 2; Lia Purpura, November 16; and Ruth Franklin and Susan Scarf Merrell, November 30.  

On December 7, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

Roger Rosenblatt Awarded Chautauqua Institution President's Medal

Roger Rosenblatt, professor in the Southampton MFA program and a Stony Brook University Distinguished Professor or English and Writing, has been awarded the President's Medal by the Chautauqua Institution.

Given for one's body of work, other recipients include Sandra Day O'Connor, David McCullough, E.O. Wilson, and Rita Moreno. Chautauqua Institution president Tom Becker presented Professor Rosenblatt with the medal on June 28 in front of a standing ovation of 7,000 people.

Read more in Happenings.

 

Jessica Soffer Named Guest Fiction Editor of the Next Issue of TSR

jessica sofferAuthor Jessica Soffer has been named the Guest Fiction Editor for the upcoming Summer/Fall 2016 issue of TSR: The Southampton Review.

What's Jessica looking for in a short story? "Is it overly simplistic to say that I'm looking for the right stuff? Good old nothing-like-it, nothing better: strong narrative. Compelling voice, evocative language, strong sense of place and pacing, sure. But whatever it takes to bait and hook a reader with just the right amount of fuss and detail and vision in whatever ratio is necessary and fitting. Maybe that's not simplistic at all."

Of her writing, novelist Colum McCann (Let the Great World Spin), says, "A profound and necessary new voice. Soffer's prose is as controlled as it is fresh, as incisive as it is musical. Soffer has arrived early, with an orchestra of talent at her disposal."

Jessica Soffer is the author of the novel Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014). Her work has appeared in Granta, The New York Times, Martha Stewart Living, Real Simple, Redbook, The Wall Street Journal, Vogue, and on NPR's "Selected Shorts." She teaches fiction and food writing at Connecticut College and Stony Brook University's MFA program and lives in Amagansett, New York.

You can learn more about Jessica at www.jessicasoffer.com, and follow her on Twitter (@jessicasoffer).

 

Frank McCourt Memoir Prize Winners Announced

frank mccourt

Scott Latta and Elizabeth Robertson Laytin are the first winners of The Southampton Review's inaugural Frank McCourt Memoir Prize

The First Prize winner is Latta's memoir, "Spring, Miss Nelson's Class."

Scott's work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Believer, The Awl, CityLab, and online at Tin House. He is a graduate of Oregon State's MFA program for nonfiction and lives in Portland.

The Second Prize winner is Elizabeth Robertson Laytin's memoir, "Black Sugar."

Elizabeth is a freelance journalist who has written for The Southampton Press, The East Hampton Press, Shelter Island Reporter, and Brown Alumni Magazine. A graduate of Brown, her short stories have been published on ducts.org and deadmule.com, and in The East Hampton Star.  She has read her work at the East Hampton Library and KGB Bar events in New York. Her YA novel Come Here, Go Away is available on Kindle, amazon.com, and at Guild Hall. She's married and has a daughter, son, and two stepdaughters, and lives year-round in East Hampton.

Both winners will be published in the upcoming Summer/Fall 2016 issue of TSR: The Southampton Review. First prize is $1,000 and second prize is $500. 

Finalists and winners were chosen by a blind selection process.

Frank McCourt, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1997 for his memoir Angela's Ashes, taught workshops at the Southampton Writers Conference beginning in 2002, when the writing program at the campus was still under the auspices of Long Island University. He continued to serve on the Writers Conference faculty through the transition to Stony Brook University in 2006 and until the summer of 2008.

He died of melanoma in July of 2009, in the same month that Volume III, No. 2 of TSR was published as a tribute to him.

Lou Ann Walker, editor-in-chief of TSR: The Southampton Review, said that the new memoir prize was named for McCourt both to honor his memory and achievements and to encourage writers submitting memoir pieces to remember the value of lacing a sense of humor into even the gravest circumstances.

 

Novelist Erica Jong Visits Writers Speak on April 27

erica jongNovelist, poet, essayist, and philosopher Erica Jong will be the featured guest in the next Writers Speak Wednesdays event, a free author talk and reading open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Jong will speak on Wednesday, April 27, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

Erica Jong — perhaps best known for her debut novel, Fear of Flying, which sold 27 million copies — writes a feminist consciousness into her literature. Well-known for her role in furthering second-wave feminism through the publication of 23 books, including novels, poetry, and nonfiction, her work disrupts conventional thinking regarding women, marriage, and sexuality. As such, it has helped define the cultural landscape and illuminated many of the issues of gender politics.

The author started out as a poet, publishing two volumes of verse before selling Fear of Flying to the editor Aaron Asher, who told her to expect sales of 3,000 copies. Instead, as Alexandra Alter wrote in The New York Times (September 7, 2015), the novel "became a blockbuster and cultural touchstone. John Updike compared it to The Catcher in the Rye, and Henry Miller praised it as a groundbreaking literary achievement. The book was translated into 40 languages and was credited by second-wave feminists with paving the way for women's self-expression."

In the same article, Alter quoted Stanford University professor Shelley Fisher Fishkin, who said of the novel: "What was really distinctive about it at the time was the notion that a woman could break out of the conventions of how a woman writer should write, and write with candor and humor about topics that were taboo for women."

Ms. Jong has since published three memoirs, five more volumes of poetry and eight other novels, including historical fiction and a work about Sappho.

In a review in The Guardian of her ninth novel, Fear of Dying, Elaine Showalter wrote that "Jong has turned the page, and as a writer she still has a lot to say."

Fear of Dying sees Jong exploring a new topic, sex between older adults. Her narrator is a new character, a lusty grandmother in her 60s who is searching for carnal satisfaction at a casual-sex site called zipless.com.

On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by 'the stars of tomorrow,' students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

Robert MacNeil Talks with Roger Rosenblatt at April 6 Writers Speak

macneilCritically acclaimed novelist, journalist, and TV news anchor Robert MacNeil will be speaking with Roger Rosenblatt in the next installment of the Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. MacNeil will read from and talk about his work on Wednesday, April 6, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

Robert MacNeil's career as a journalist began at the Reuters news agency in London in 1955; five years later he moved into broadcast reporting as a London correspondent for NBC News. In 1963 he joined NBC's Washington bureau, covering the Civil Rights Movement, the White House, and the assassination of John F. Kennedy. He worked for the BBC before joining PBS in 1971, going on to become the executive editor of the MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour on PBS and winning the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism in 2008.

He is the author of four novels: Burden of Desire (Formac), Breaking News (Nan A. Talese), Portrait of Julia: A Novel (Formac), and The Voyage (Mariner Books). He is also the author of three memoirs and is the coauthor of The Story of English (Penguin) and its sequel, Do You Speak American? (Mariner).

MacNeil also serves as the chairman of the board of the MacDowell Colony, the century-old retreat for artists, writers and musicians in Peterborough, New Hampshire. He is a trustee of the Freedom Forum Newseum, the world's first museum of journalism, and is co-chairman of the Council of Conservators of the New York Public Library. He has four children and lives with his wife, Donna, in Manhattan and Nova Scotia.

Roger Rosenblatt is the author of six off-Broadway plays and seventeen books, including New York Times Notable Books Kayak Morning (Ecco) and The Boy Detective (Ecco), as well as Unless It Moves the Human Heart (Ecco), Making Toast (Ecco), Rules for Aging (Mariner), and Children of War (Anchor), which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He lives in Quogue, New York, and is a Distinguished Professor of English and Writing at Stony Brook Southampton.

The final writer for the 2016 Spring series will be Erica Jong, reading from and talking about her work on April 27.

On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

Iris Smyles Is Up Next at March 23 Writers Speak

iris smylesIris Smyles will be the next featured guest in the Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Smyles will read from and talk about her work on Wednesday, March 23, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

Iris Smyles has published two books of fiction: her semi-autobiographical debut novel Iris Has Free Time (Soft Skull Press, 2013) and the forthcoming Dating Tips for the Unemployed (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, June 2016). She was a humor columnist for Splice Today, and her stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, BOMB, The New York Times, McSweeney's Internet Tendency and Best American Travel Writing 2015, among other publications and anthologies.

Founder and editor of the web-museum Smyles & Fish, she edited and wrote the afterword for the cult book The Capricious Critic, based on a column she commissioned for that site. Currently an artist in residence as part of a new program at Guild Hall Center for the Visual and Performing Arts in East Hampton, she lives in New York and Greece.

A Benjamin Rybeck review on Electric Lit characterized Iris Has Free Time as "a darkly comic, affecting portrait of a 20-something with literary ambitions." Oprah.com named it one of "10 dazzling debut novels to pick up right now."

Other writers scheduled for the spring series include: Robert MacNeil in conversation with Roger Rosenblatt, April 6; and Erica Jong, April 27.

On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

MFA in Creative Writing Faculty to Read at March 9 Writers Speak

susan merrell
Susan Merrell

Writers Ursula Hegi, Susan Scarf Merrell, Roger Rosenblatt, Julie Sheehan, and Lou Ann Walker—all members of Stony Brook Southampton's MFA in Creative Writing faculty—will be the featured guests at the March 9 installment of the spring Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. The authors will read from their work on Wednesday, March 9, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

Novelist Ursula Hegi is the author of 12 books. Her "Burgdorf Cycle" encompasses four of her novels: Stones from the River, Floating in My Mother's Palm, The Vision of Emma Blau, and now Children and Fire. Hegi's work has been translated into many languages, and her awards include the Italian Grinzane Cavour, an NEA Fellowship, and a PEN/Faulkner Award. She has taught at Barnard College, the University of California at Irvine, and Bread Loaf. She has also served as a juror for the National Book Awards and the National Book Critics Circle.

Novelist, short story writer, and essayist Susan Scarf Merrell has served as Fiction Editor of TSR:The Southampton Review and is currently the Southampton Writers Conference Director. She is the author, most recently, of Shirley: A Novel, about a young woman who goes to live with the famed gothic horror writer Shirley Jackson in 1964. The novel has been optioned by HBO and was selected by Paperback Book Club. Merrell is also author of the novel A Member of the Family and the nonfiction book The Accidental Bond: How Sibling Connections Influence Adult Relationships. Her short stories and essays have been published in the literary reviews Tin House, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Publishers Weekly online, Largehearted Boy, The Southampton Review, The New Haven Review and elsewhere.

Distinguished Professor of English and Writing Roger Rosenblatt is an essayist, novelist, and playwright. His essays for Time magazine won two George Polk awards, among others. His television essays for the PBS Newshour won the Peabody and the Emmy. He is the author of six Off-Broadway plays and 15 books, published in 13 languages. They include the New York Times bestsellers Kayak Morning, Unless It Moves the Human Heart and Making Toast, a memoir of his family, which was expanded from an essay that initially appeared in The New Yorker. Other books include the novels Beet and Lapham Rising, another bestseller, as were Rules for Aging and Children of War, winner of the Robert F. Kennedy book prize. His one-man show, Free Speech in America, was cited by the Times as one of the 10 best plays of 1991.

Poet Julie Sheehan is the director of MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program at Stony Brook Southampton. Julie Sheehan's three poetry collections are Bar Book: Poems & Otherwise (W.W. Norton), Orient Point (Norton) and Thaw (Fordham). Her honors include a Whiting Writers' Award and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Poetry. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker and many other magazines and anthologies.

Lou Ann Walker is the Editor-in-Chief of TSR:The Southampton Review. Her memoir, A Loss for Words, won a Christopher Award. She is also the author of Hand, Heart & Mind: The Education of America's Deaf People. Her fiction and nonfiction has appeared in many publications, including The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Life, Allure, Parade, The Chicago Sun-Times, The New York Times Book Review, O: The Oprah Magazine, The Writer, and The Hopewell Review. Formerly an editor at Esquire and New York Magazine, Walker has lectured on writing at Smith College and Yale University, and taught at Marymount Manhattan College, Southampton College, and Columbia University.

Other writers scheduled for the series include: novelist Terese Svoboda in conversation with poet and MFA in Creative Writing Director Julie Sheehan, March 23; Robert MacNeil in conversation with Roger Rosenblatt, April 6; and Erica Jong, April 27.

On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030 or visit www.stonybrook.edu/mfa. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

Poet Gregory Pardio Comes to Writers Speak March 2

greg pardioPulitzer Prize-winning poet Gregory Pardlo will be the next guest in the spring Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Pardlo will speak on Wednesday, March 2, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

In 2015, Gregory Pardlo's ​poetry collection​ "Digest" (Four Way Books) won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Pulitzer Prize judges praised Pardlo's collection as "clear-voiced poems that bring readers the news from 21st century America, rich with thought, ideas and histories public and private." The collection​ was also shortlisted for the​ 2015 NAACP Image Award and was a finalist for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award.

Other honors Pardlo has received​ include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts. His first collection, "Totem" was selected by Brenda Hillman for the APR/Honickman Prize in 2007. Pardlo's poems have appeared in​ The Nation, Ploughshares, ​Tin House, t​he Norton Anthology of Contemporary African-American Poetry, Best American Poetry, and other publications. Currently living with his family in Brooklyn, Pardlo teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing program at Rutgers University-Camden.

Other writers scheduled for the series include: MFA in Creative Writing faculty members Ursula Hegi, Susan Scarf Merrell, Roger Rosenblatt, Julie Sheehan and Lou Ann Walker, March 9; novelist Terese Svoboda in conversation with poet and MFA in Creative Writing Director Julie Sheehan, March 23; Robert MacNeil in conversation with Roger Rosenblatt, April 6; and Erica Jong, April 27.

On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030 or visit the Writers Speak web page. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

The Southampton Review Announces the Frank McCourt Memoir Prize

frank mccourtThe Southampton Review, the literary journal devoted to emerging and established writers and artists, has announced the Frank McCourt Memoir Prize.

The submission period opens at midnight February 15, 2016 and closes at midnight March 15.

The contest seeks "writing that is intimate, illuminating, moving, tragicomic, or just plain comic." Alumni and current MFA students of Stony Brook Southampton are welcome to enter the contest. There is a $10 submission fee per entry.

First prize is $1,000 and second prize is $500. Winners will be published in the Summer/Fall 2016 Issue of TSR. Multiple submissions of 4,500 words or less will be accepted. Learn more at The Southampton Review website's submission page.

Frank McCourt, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1997 for his memoir Angela's Ashes, taught workshops at the Southampton Writers Conference beginning in 2002, when the writing program at the campus was still under the auspices of Long Island University. He continued to serve on the Writers Conference faculty through the transition to Stony Brook University in 2006 and until the summer of 2008.

He died of melanoma in July of 2009, in the same month that Volume III, No. 2 of TSR was published as a tribute to him.

Lou Ann Walker, editor-in-chief of TSR: The Southampton Review, said last month that the new memoir prize was named for McCourt both to honor his memory and achievements and to encourage writers submitting memoir pieces to remember the value of lacing a sense of humor into even the gravest circumstances.

McCourt wrote Angela's Ashes in 1996, at the age of 60, and received the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Circle Award (1996). That was followed by ‘Tis (1999), Teacher Man (2005) and Angela and the Baby Jesus (2007).

Dedicated to publishing fine fiction, nonfiction, plays, screenplays, poetry, literary cartoons, photography and art, The Southampton Review opens its pages to writers from across the globe whose work is compelling.

Writers with questions about the prize can email editors@thesouthamptonreview.com.

 

Lorin Stein Joins Dan Menaker at Writers Speak February 10

lorin steinRenowned Paris Review editor Lorin Stein and former New Yorker fiction editor, author, and professor Dan Menaker will talk about writing at what will now be the first installment of the Spring Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free author talks and readings open to the public at Stony Brook Southampton. Stein and Menaker will speak on Wednesday, February 10, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

Artist April Gornik and Parrish Art Museum Curator of Special Projects Andrea Grover were scheduled to be the first featured guests in the Spring Writers Speak series on January 27, but the event was cancelled on January 25.

Since taking over as the editor of The Paris Review in 2010, Lorin Stein has shaped the esteemed periodical to match his own vision. He has developed an online archive of Review interviews from the "Writers at Work Series," has written an advice column, and oversees the journal's daily blog.

Under his leadership, The Review has received two National Magazine Awards, as well as Webby honors, Pushcart Prizes, and O'Henry Awards. Stein's criticism and translations have appeared in The New York Review of Books, the London Review of Books, n+1, and Harper's.

Stein has also edited "The Unprofessionals: New American Writing From The Paris Review" (Penguin) and co-edited "Object Lessons: The Paris Review Presents the Art of the Short Story" (Picador). Both are anthologies of the best work from The Paris Review.

Stein previously worked as fiction editor, and is now an editor-at-large, at Farrar, Straus and Giroux publishing, with some of the manuscripts he edited going on to win top literary prizes. Among these are the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the Believer Book Award. While he has worked alongside such notable authors as Denis Johnson, Lydia Davis, and Jonathan Franzen, he has also ensured that The Paris Review continues to feature writers outside the mainstream.

dan menakerAn editor at The New Yorker for 20 years, Daniel Menaker went on to the post of editor-in-chief at Random House, and now serves as a consultant for Barnes & Noble. He worked with such writers as Salman Rushdie, Colum McCann, Elizabeth Strout, and Nassim Taleb. He has published five books, two of them New York Times Notable Books, and has twice won the O. Henry Award for short fiction.

Other writers scheduled for the series include: poet Gregory Pardlo, March 2; MFA in Creative Writing faculty members Ursula Hegi, Susan Scarf Merrell, Roger Rosenblatt, Julie Sheehan and Lou Ann Walker, March 9; novelist Terese Svoboda in conversation with poet and MFA in Creative Writing Director Julie Sheehan, March 23; Robert MacNeil in conversation with Roger Rosenblatt, April 6; and Erica Jong, April 27.

On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow": students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030 or visit the Writers Speak web page. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

UPDATE: Jan. 27 Writers Speak with Artist April Gornik Postponed

april gornikThe Jan. 27 Writers Speak event featuring April Gornik has been postponed by a scheduling conflict. A new date has not yet been set.


Artist April Gornik will be in conversation with Parrish Art Museum Curator of Special Projects Andrea Grover as the Writers Speak Wednesdays series of free artist and author talks and readings returns for the Spring semester at Stony Brook Southampton. Gornik and Grover will be the program's featured guests on Wednesday, January 27, at 7 p.m. in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall.

High on the list of topics the two women will discuss will be April Gornik: Drawings (FigureGround Press, 2014), an extensive compilation of charcoal drawings done by Gornik since 1984. Included in this collection of 204 drawings are short introductory essays by Steve Martin and Archie Rand as well as a long, informative conversation with Lawrence Weschler that explores Gornik's process, subject matter, and aesthetic disposition.

Of interest to writers, in a piece for The Brooklyn Rail, artist and writer Robert Berlind wrote that "Weschler … not only probes Gornik's early development and responds deeply to the work in question, but also aptly introduces poetry by Kay Ryan, Seamus Heaney, Eamon Grennan, James Wright, and Lao Tzu. These excerpts implicitly make the case for poetry, rather than theory or art history, as the most fruitful resource for discussing visual art."

The book also includes an eight-page, handwritten score for a cello and piano composition, "For April," by East End composer Bruce Wolosoff, inspired by one of Gornik's paintings. The musical piece is available through iTunes with purchase of the book.

The drawings in the book have been described by the publisher as "lush and wide-ranging in scope and subject," landscapes that "call out the wild and the cultivated, from the desert to the forest to the sea, and show both the progress and consistency in her evocative approach to drawing."

groverApril Gornik's art has been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (1998); East Hampton's Guild Hall Museum (1994); the Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art (1993); and the Parrish Art Museum (1988). She received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Guild Hall Museum in 2003. A mid-career retrospective began at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, NY, in fall 2004, and traveled to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery in Nebraska and the Allen Memorial Art Museum in Oberlin, Ohio.

As the Century Arts Foundation Curator of Special Projects at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, Andrea Grover is initiating new models for temporary and off-site exhibitions via the museum's Platform and Parrish Road Show series. In 2014, Grover received the prestigious Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award for the forthcoming exhibition, "Radical Seafaring," at the Parrish Art Museum in 2016.

Other writers scheduled for the series include: Paris Review editor Lorin Stein in conversation with former New Yorker fiction editor Daniel Menaker, February 10; poet Gregory Pardlo, March 2; MFA in Creative Writing faculty members Ursula Hegi, Susan Scarf Merrell, Roger Rosenblatt, Julie Sheehan and Lou Ann Walker, March 9; novelist Terese Svoboda in conversation with poet and MFA in Creative Writing Director Julie Sheehan, March 23; Robert MacNeil in conversation with Roger Rosenblatt, April 6; and Erica Jong, April 27. On May 4, the evening will be devoted to readings by "the stars of tomorrow," students currently enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Writers Speak Wednesdays programs are free and open to the public. The evenings begin with a brief reception at 6:30 p.m.; readings begin at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A and book signing. All programs are held in the Radio Lounge on the second floor of Chancellors Hall at Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton, NY 11968.

For more information, call 631-632-5030 or visit the Writers Speak web page. On Facebook, visit Writers Speak Wednesdays; to follow on Twitter, @ WritersSpeakWed.

 

New Non-Credit Writing Workshop Comes to Stony Brook Southampton

Passionate and talented writers in the Southampton area and eastern Long Island are eligible to attend a new non-credit workshop at Stony Brook Southampton. Offered on Wednesdays from 5:20 to 8:10 p.m., January 27 through May 18, the workshop will focus on multiple genres.

Students are not required to be accepted by, nor enrolled in, the Stony Brook Southampton MFA in Creative Writing program to take the course, which will be taught by William Ste. Marie.

Students will start by reading works across genres to discover what drives great writing. They will then analyze story elements and structure. After developing a general foundation in the basics of writing, the class will zero in on specific attributes of craft through the genres of short story, scriptwriting, and poetry.

By the end of the course, students will have produced one quality poem, short story, and short film script. Class size is limited to 16 students; the 17-session class costs $700.

William Ste. Marie was born and raised in New York City's forgotten borough of Staten Island. A certified English teacher and recipient of the College of Staten Island's Creative Writing Award, he is an MFA candidate in the Stony Brook Southampton MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program.

Ste. Marie is an instructor at Stony Brook University and at the College of Staten Island. Also a lifelong musician, he has played gigs at such New York City haunts as Webster Hall, Gramercy Theatre, and the Bitter End. 

For more information, call 631-632-5030; to apply, visit the workshop's web page. William Ste. Marie can be reached with questions at stemarie.william@stonybrook.edu