ACADEMIC JUDICIARY ANNUAL REPORT

May 2000 - May 2001

Prepared by Nancy Franklin (Executive Officer) and John Shea (Chair)

 

Reporting Period

5/00-5/01

5/99-5/00

5/98-5/99

Accusations

 

 

 

Total accusations against students

175

144

93

Total number of appeals

47

36

21

Total number of hearings held

46

33

13

Result of hearing = Guilty

37

29

6

Result of hearing = Not Guilty

9

7

7

Hearings pending (as of report date, result included in next reporting period)

1

3

8

Total expulsions

5

4

1

Total suspensions

3

4

0

Total cases where charges withdrawn

5

4

2

Total cases with no Q grade, per prof request

0

8

8

Grievances

 

 

 

Total grievances against professors

3

2

8

Decision: No basis found for hearing

1

2

4

Decision:  In favor of student

2

0

3

OTHER:

 

 

 

Permanent Q or notation without dismissal

1

0

0

Removal of "Suspension" remark for former student, per student's petition

0

1

0

Accusation forwarded to Graduate School

3

0

0

 

SUMMARY STATISTICS REGARDING ACCUSATIONS AGAINST STUDENTS:

 

5/00-5/01

5/99-5/00

5/98-5/99

Change in Case load since previous report

22%

55%

no data

% of all cases for which hearings were held

27%

25%

23%

% of hearings in which finding was guilty

80%

79%

46%

% of all cases in which finding was guilty

95%

95%

92%


Other Progress

 

Education

1.      Executive Officer presented at multiple graduate TA seminars, undergraduate courses and orientations, and departmental faculty meetings.  On the recognition of cultural differences in standards for defining academic dishonesty, she met with AIM/EOP advisors at their invitation to suggest ways to protect their students from risk.

2.      With the help of Q course instructors Annie Aversa and Brian Delong, the AJC provided ready-made academic dishonesty component to all USB 101 instructors to use in their courses.

3.      AJC now provides a single-page AJC information sheet to be included in all orientation packets for incoming undergraduates.

4.      AJC revamped and expanded university's course in academic integrity (Q course), required of all students found guilty of academic dishonesty.  We now offer a concentrated summer Q course.

5.      The Executive Officer contributes a bi-weekly AJC Blotter to the Statesman (eliminating student & faculty identity).

6.      Executive Officer will co-host a Fall 2001 workshop in academic integrity for all superintendents and principals of Long Island and New York City high schools.  Primary goals are to educate them in preventing and catching cheating and to make them partners in teaching students how to avoid plagiarism (our biggest and fastest growing problem).  The workshop will be introduced by Shirley Kenny and will be co-hosted by Don McCabe of Rutgers, a national expert in college and high school cheating and the founding president of the Center for Academic Integrity (a consortium of about 200 universities).

7.      Faculty are becoming more aware of dishonesty, as reflected in our increased caseload.

 

Policy

1.      Developed formal set of Guidelines for the AJC, approved by CAS Senate in April 2001.

2.      Students found guilty of dishonesty must complete the Q course immediately.  This is for their own protection so that their risk of a second accusation is minimized.

3.      Selection of hearing board members revamped to minimize any appearance of conflict of interest and to ensure that all members have been trained prior to hearing a case.

4.      Students are no longer automatically excluded from honor status upon graduation if they have been found guilty of academic dishonesty.  The AJC reviews graduating seniors twice a year to determine whether we would like to recommend exceptions.