To: Arts and Sciences Senate
From: Nancy Tomes, Chair, Undergraduate Curriculum Committee
Re: 2006-2007 Annual Report
Date: September, 2007

I. General Information
On behalf of the CC, I am pleased to submit our annual report for the last academic year, 2006-2007. As this report makes clear, we had an extremely busy year. The Committee has particularly requested that I call to your attention problems that arose last year in relation to the Journalism program's media literacy grant and the review of the new Southhampton curriculum. The report includes excerpts from the meeting minutes that discuss those issues. As Chair of the CC, I will be happy to meet with the Executive Committee and/or the Senate to discuss the Committee's concerns.

The curriculum committee met twenty-four times during the 2006-2007 academic year. Committee members were: Nancy Tomes (History and chair of the committee, spring), Robert Cerrato (Marine Sciences), Thomas Weinacht (Physics & Astronomy), Darlene Prowse (Asian and Asian American studies), Roy Lacey (College of Arts and Sciences), Sarah Sternglanz (Women’s Studies), Stephanie Dinkins (Art), Arlene Feldman (Transfer Office, ex officio member), Yvette VanGorden (Registrar’s Office, ex officio member), , Andrew Gouldstone (Materials Science and Engineering, ex officio member from the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Nisha Kumar (Undergraduate Student Representative, fall only), Anna Webb (Undergraduate Student Representative, spring only), and Kane Gillespie (College of Arts and Sciences, ex officio secretary). Elizabeth Conklin (College of Arts and Science Dean’s Office) attended several meetings as a guest.

The Committee met with several guests, including College of Arts and Sciences Dean James Staros and Dean of Stony Brook Southampton Martin Schoonen, Mark Aronoff, Donna di Donato, and Jean Peden.
Routine matters are handled by the secretary and announced to the committee at each meeting. There were a number of routine matters chiefly involving deletion of courses and changes of course titles, descriptions, course combinations and/or prerequisites to bring them in line with current teaching practices.

The Committee worked to publish two updated online versions of the 2007-09 Bulletin (Spring 2007 and Fall 2007 editions) and the bound version of the 2007-2009 Bulletin. The secretary also serves as the editor of that Bulletin.

Members of the Committee served as representatives on departmental review for the Departments of Geosciences, Computer Science, History and Philosophy and the Humanities Institute.

Arts & Science Senate
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

II. General Curricular Matters
The Committee was unable to devote adequate time to general curricular matters given the time required to complete discussions on new Southampton majors and the Journalism program's media literacy grant.

Combined Degree Programs
Three more combined degree programs were approved by the A/S Curriculum Committee and await approval at other points Africana Studies Approval of the Africana Studies/History BA/MAT five-year combined degree [pending additional campus approval before requesting review in Albany]

Biology
Approval of the Biology BS/MAT five-year combined degree [pending additional campus approval before requesting review in Albany]

Mathematics Approval of the Mathematics BS/MAT five-year combined degree subsequently approved in June 2007 by NY SED.

New Interdisciplinary Courses of Note AST/EGL 389-H Science Fiction Delivery of this course is an interdisciplinary project by the Departments of English and Physics and Astronomy GEO/BIO/ESG/ESS/ECO 301-H Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens Delivery of this course is an interdisciplinary project by the Departments of Geosciences, Economics, Undergraduate Biology, and Materials Science and the Marine Sciences Research Center. The course is also associated with a research Grant and will most likely be offered at Stony Brook Southampton.

New Minors Art Minor in Digital Arts Chemistry Minor in Chemistry Living / Learning Center Minor in Technical Leadership

III. Significant Curricular Changes by Department or Program

Africana Studies
New courses AFS 320-K Black Popular Culture and the Terrain and AFH/EGL/WST 382-G Black Women's Lit of the African Diaspora were approved. The committee approved AFS 339 Recent African American History and approved the permanent cross listing with HIS 339
The committee approved the proposed BA/MAT in Africana Studies.
2
Anthropology
The committee approved the new course ANT 382 Human Demography, and approved the name change for ANT 366 Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers to “Hunters and Gatherers.”

Art
The committee approved the proposed Minor in Digital Arts along with two new courses: ARH 326 Intermediate Electronic Media: Video and Animation and ARH 327-H Intermediate Electronic Media: Web Art and Design. The Digital Arts Minor was updated by the CTPC and one of the required courses was changed from CSE 125 to CSE 325 due to a numbering change by the CSE department. A lab was approved for ARS 326 , and contact hours for studio art classes apply to ARS courses. A lab was added to ARS 481 Photography III and the course was crosslisted with ARS 482 Photography IV.

Asian and Asian American Studies
The following courses were approved: AAS 209-D Indian Classical Dance: Theory and Technique, AAS 391.03 - HumTop in AAAS: Buddhism and Early Vedanta Philosophy, AAS 370-J Intercultural Communication.

A proposed change to the major was approved: add Hinduism as one of the topics that can be used to fulfill the Depth requirement in RLS major in the revised Bulletin.
The request to increase credits for SKT 111, 112, 211, 212 from 3 to 4 credits was approved.

Undergraduate Biology
New courses approved: BIO 313 – Application of Molecular and Cellular Biology Techniques (winter session only), BIO 314 Cancer Biology, BIO 204 and 205 Fundamentals of Scientific Inquiry in the Biological Sciences I and II.
Approved prerequisite change for BIO 341: current: “prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIO 203” proposed: “prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIO 202”
Approved prerequisite change for BIO 362:
current: “C or higher in BIO 202; CHE 322 or 332”
proposed: C or higher in BIO 202 and BIO 361; CHE 322 or 332

BIO 204/205 curricular changes
Revision of the introductory laboratory sequence (BIO 201, 202, 203).
The committee worked with the Undergraduate Biology Program director following a charge from the Dean to improve the student throughput in the gateway Biology Laboratory Courses. Previous to the change, the laboratory sequence consisted of four courses, each of which was comprised of a lecture and laboratory component (Bio 150, 201, 202, 203), and each of which required one semester to complete. The new curriculum detached the laboratory from the lecture, and reduced the number of semesters required to complete the laboratory sequence from four semesters to two. As a result, BIO 150, 201, 202, and 203 will continue as independent lectures, and two new laboratory courses, BIO 204 and BIO 205, will be added to accompany BIO 150, 201, 202 and 203. The new laboratory courses cover the same material that was covered cumulatively in the previous BIO 150, BIO 201, BIO 202, and BIO 203 labs. The result of the curricular change is increased throughput of students, flexibility for student enrollment and an optimized use of university resources including faculty and laboratory facilities.

The changes to the BIO curriculum have campus-wide implications. Subsequent changes were required to other courses and programs as described in more detail in “Significant Curricular Changes by Department.”

Several programs were changed as a result of implementing the BIO 204/205 curriculum
Majors Biology (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence) Biochemistry (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence) Biomedical Engineering (reduce credits in sample course sequence (BME will not require 204 and 205)) Environmental Studies (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence) Marine Sciences (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence) Marine Vertebrate Biology (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence) Pharmachology (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence) Psychology BS (add BIO 204 and 205 to major requirements; change sample course sequence)

Minors Biology

The following is a list of amended prerequisites that include the newly approved BIO 204 or 205:

BIO 201 (amend prerequisite: Level 3 or higher on the mathematics placement examination Advisory Prerequisite: High School Biology)

ANP 340 Field Methods in Physical Anthropology
Prerequisites: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204; permission of instructor

ANP 350 Methods in Studying Primates
Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201(as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204

ANP 360-H Primate Conservation
Advisory Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204

ANP 403 Problems in Physical Anthropology
Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204

BIO 311 Techniques in Molecular and Cellular Biology
Prerequisites: BIO 202; BIO 204 and 205 (beginning in fall 2008); CHE 132 or 142; MAT 125 or higher or AMS 151; or permission of instructor

BIO 327 Developmental Genetics Laboratory
Prerequisite: BIO 325; BIO 204 and 205 (beginning fall 2008)

BIO 335 Animal Physiology Laboratory
Prerequisites: CHE 132, 133; BIO 204 and 205 (beginning fall 2008)

BIO 341 Plant Diversity
Prerequisites: BIO 201 and 202 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 and 202 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204 and 205

BIO 344 Chordate Zoology
Prerequisite: BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204 and BIO 205

BIO 346 Aquatic Arthropods and Vertebrates
Prerequisite: BIO 201 or MAR 104; BIO 204 and 205

BIO 352 Ecology Laboratory
Prerequisite: BIO 204 and 205

BIO 365 Biochemistry Laboratory
Prerequisite: BIO 204 and 205 (beginning fall 2008)

BIO 367 Molecular Diversity Laboratory
Prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIO 202 (as offered prior to fall 2007); and BIO 320 or BIO 351 or BIO 354; or BIO 201 and BIO 202 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204 and 205, and BIO 320 or BIO 351 or BIO 354

BIO 380 Entomology
Prerequisites: BIO 201, 202 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 and 202 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204 and BIO 205

Career Center
The following course was approved: EXT 288 Internship.

Chemistry
CHE 129 replaces CHE 123+124
Students enrolling in introductory Chemistry are placed in one of two course sequences based on their mathematics preparation. Prior to Fall 2006, students with lower math preparation were placed in a three semester sequence, (CHE 123 ��124 ��132) and higher prepared students were placed in a two semester sequence (CHE 131 ��132). Research within the Department determined that less prepared students would be served as well or better by replacing the three semester sequence with a two semester sequence if instruction during the first semester were tailored to the student math preparation level and if instruction were supplemented by extra discussion groups. The department therefore proposed replacing CHE 123 and CHE 124 with CHE 129 for less prepared students and supplementing instruction with a co-required “discussion” course, CHE 130.

Beginning in Fall 2006, the two new sequences consist of CHE 129+130 ��CHE 132 for students with lower math preparation and CHE 131 ��CHE 132 for students with higher math preparation. The result of the curricular change is a decreased time to completion for less prepared students, increased overall throughput of students, flexibility for student enrollment and an optimized use of university resources including facilities and faculty.

Other Chemistry changes
The following change to course contact hours was approved: CHE 302 – add recitations and amend contact hours for 4 credits (no change in total contact hours).

A Minor in Chemistry was approved. The department proposed that the specific conditions for the proposed Minor in Chemistry be spelled out in the Bulletin for each major. The committee discussed whether to include the details and conditions of the minor (requirements are conditional upon which major the student is enrolled) and that the minor entry in the Bulletin would be very long. For the minor requirements part C., the committee suggested that the Special restriction could simply state “A minimum of 9 upper division CHE 300 or 400 level credits must be earned in courses not used towards for the student’s major.” The committee will discuss this further if the Chemistry department wishes to include more clarification in the Bulletin.

Chemical and Molecular Engineering
The proposal to add a DEC H to CME 201 was approved.

Engineering Chemistry
The committee was pleased to approve changes to the ECM major. Summary: - A core program: add CHE 129 to the choice of courses - B Drop current #6 CHE 326 Organic Chemistry IIB and substitute ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structure of Solids - revise sample course sequence accordingly

Comparative Literature and Comparative Studies
The proposal to add a film lab to CLT 363 was approved. Contact hours increase for lab due to film showing.

English
The following courses were approved: AST/EGL 389-H Science Fiction, AFH/EGL/WST 382-G Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora.

The proposal to drop recitations for EGL 226-K 20th Century American Literature was approved. Contact hours remain the same.

European Languages
The following courses were approved: RUS 332 Professional Russian Online, GRK 111, 112 Elementary Greek (proposal for reactivation), RUS 411 Advanced Russian I (Fourth-year), RUS 412 Advanced Russian II (Fourth-year) (proposals for reactivation for summer study abroad programs).
The proposal for the renumbering of HUL 424 to HUL 324 and subsequent change to prerequisites for other courses was approved. The proposal for the addition of DEC I to HUL 424 was approved. The department proposes the renumbering so that the course may be used as a prerequisite for higher-level courses. HUL 324 will be used as a prerequisite for SPN 462, 463, and 465.

The committee approved (a) the renumbering, (b) the changes to the prerequisites for the renumbered HUL 324, and (c) the prerequisites to SPN 462, 463, and 465. Changes to prerequisites for other 400-level courses in the department that should include the new HUL 324 should be proposed to the Committee.

The request to change prerequisites for ITL 425 “Italian and Its Dialects” and ITL 426 “Italian Linguistics” was approved. Currently both courses have the same prerequisites: current prerequisites: ITL 311 and 312 revised prerequisite: ITL 311, ITL 312, HUL 324, or permission of instructor

First Year Seminar
The following courses were approved: “FYS” 275 and 276 Teaching Practica.

Geosciences
The following courses were approved: GEO 106 Planetary Geology, GEO 301 (crosslist with BIO 301, ECO 301, ESG 301, ESS 511) Pine Barrens Sustainability

History
The following course was approved: AFS/HIS 339 Recent African American History.
The proposals to add recitations to HIS 370 and HIS 213 were approved, and the proposal to remove recitations from HIS 261 was approved. Credit and contact hours for all courses remain unchanged.
The proposal to add a DEC I to HIS 356 Zionism before 1948 was approved.

Journalism
JRN 101-B and JRN 103-G resolution
The A/S Curriculum Committee reluctantly approved a proposal to allow an exception to curricular policy that will facilitate the University to satisfy its commitments for a $1.8M grant from the Knight Foundation. The School of Journalism will aim to offer the course, News Literacy, to at least 10,000 students by 2011. In particular, the Committee was concerned that curricular decisions could be influenced by receipt of a grant.

The request to allow students to choose DEC B or G for JRN 101 was reluctantly approved following lengthy discussion and debate by the committee. Following the ruling by the Undergraduate Council in December, 2006, Dean Howard Schneider and Dean James Staros agreed on a solution that will help Schneider achieve the target of 10,000 enrollments in JRN 101 over four years without mandating enrollment in the course. The solution would be to allow students to choose whether to apply either DEC B or DEC G to their course record. The Deans agree that students should not be able to satisfy both DEC categories of B and G through a single enrollment, through repetition of the course, through petition, or by any other means. The Deans are also aware that current policy restricts a course from satisfying more than one DEC, and that the Undergraduate Council may need to consider a temporary exception to this policy. The proposal is a 3 or 4 year commitment with measurement by a national expert to see if the course is an effective way of making students more educated news consumers. The grant supports 80 graduate student News Fellows to help teach the students. Schneider stresses that this 4-year experiment has no requirement to continue when the years are completed. The grant from the Knight Foundation requires a minimum of 10,000 students to take the course. Wherever a prerequisite requires JRN 101, JRN 103 has been added as a prerequisite.

An excerpt from the course description: “This course is designed to prepare students to become more discriminating news consumers. By examining standards of reliability and accuracy in news gathering and presentation, and seek to establish the differences between news and propaganda, assertion and verification, bias and fairness, and infotainment and journalism. Students will be encouraged to critically examine news broadcasts, newspaper articles and Web sites.”

The committee also approved thirteen new courses for the relatively new Major in Journalism, which was approved during the 2005-06 academic year: JRN 288, JRN 487, JRN 330, JRN 335, JRN 360, JRN 361, JRN 362, JRN 370, JRN 371, JRN 380, JRN 382, JRN 390, JRN 391, JRN 411, and JRN 435.

Linguistics
The proposal to change the prerequisites for LIN 375 was approved. The department requested dropping the "two years of a language" prerequisite. The new perquisite reads: Declared major in Linguistics; C or higher in one of LIN 101, 201, or 211; g.p.a. of 2.75 or higher; for non-native speakers of English , a SPEAK test score of 50 or higher.

English as a Second Language
Changes approved to ESL course descriptions, prerequisites and deletions. See Bulletin Supplement for Spring 2007.
ESL 191 Intermediate Oral/Aural Skills
ESL 193 Advanced Composition
ESL 194 Academic English Skills for U.S. Residents
ESL 198 Advanced Oral/Aural Skills and Accent Improvement
ESL 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I (deleted)
ESL 476 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II (deleted)

Living/Learning Center
The proposed minor in Technical Leadership (LTL) was approved.
The revision of LSE 201 was approved to change the description to: “A survey of the various science and engineering disciplines. Guest speakers describe their respective fields of research and study and the opportunities for students entering the field today. Other topics include ethics, intellectual property and entrepreneurship. The interdisciplinary nature of science and technology is emphasized.” from “A survey of the various science and engineering disciplines. Guest speakers describe their respective fields of research and study and the opportunities for students entering the field today. The interdisciplinary nature of science and technology is emphasized. The course includes research laboratory tours and demonstrations.”

Marine Sciences Research Center

Atmospheric Sciences
MEC 110 was deleted from the requirements for the ATM major due to discontinuation of the course.

Environmental Studies
The following course was approved: ENS 380-H Stony Brook in Tanzania: Lake Victoria Environment and Human Health (summer only)

Mathematics
The following course was approved: Experimental Winter Course: MAT 129. Approved with “prerequisites: B or better in MAT 125 or Level 6 on the math placement exam.” The committee notes that a special exception is being made for the prerequisite language on this course because of the intensive nature of the abbreviated winter session course. The committee normally does not consider prerequisites that require a grade of C or better. The course will only be offered during winter sessions.
The committee approved using MAT 126 as prerequisite to MAT 132 or AMS 161.

Physics and Astronomy
The following courses were approved: AST/EGL 307-H Science Fiction, PHY 315-E Cosmic Rays.
The Optics specialization for the Physics major was approved.
A credit change for PHY 475 from 3 to 0-3 credits was approved.
The proposal for a minimum grade of C for follow-on Physics courses was approved.

Political Science
The following course was approved: POL 310: Politics of Immigration and Refugees.
The proposal to add BUS 215 to the listing of statistics courses in the "C. Methodology Requirement" in the major requirements was approved. The listing now reads "AMS 102, BUS 215, ECO 320, POL 201, PSY 201, or SOC 202." A related change was made on the third page of our Bulletin copy where a Sample Course Sequence is given.

Stony Brook Southampton
At the urgent request of the Dean of Southampton, the committee convened three special meetings to review the Southampton Majors and 66 course proposals. The Committee conditionally approved the majors and most of the courses. Some courses are pending approval because they were lacking supporting documents or missing information on the proposal or syllabi.

The four majors are: Bachelor of Arts in Ecosystems and Human Impact (EHI) Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design, Policy and Planning (EPP) Bachelor of Arts in Sustainability Studies (SUS) Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science (ENV)
A fifth major was discussed but formal proposal is expected in 2007-08.
Arts, Culture and Theories BA (ACT)
Statement of Approval [excerpt from minutes]

The Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee is pleased to have had the opportunity to review these new majors and to participate in the shaping of Stony Brook Southampton. In all, the majors have interesting foci, and many courses are welcome additions to the Stony Brook curriculum, especially those topics that have not been discussed academically on Long Island or the region with the breadth that is indicated by the scope of the proposed majors. However, pending receipt of documents as indicated in “general issues” below, the Committee approves the four new majors with some reluctance, for two reasons.

First, the Committee has been asked to process these majors far more quickly than is desirable for the committee members, the CAS staff, and ultimately for the students themselves. These majors require among the highest credit loads for majors under the purview of the A/S Senate. The Committee understands that an interdisciplinary major with a large science component is likely to be credit rich. But members also believe that had proposers been willing or able to spend more time fine tuning the core courses and other requirements, they could have given Southampton students a few more electives to enrich their college career. The Committee also worries that a high number of credits risks limiting flexibility for students to take electives unrelated to their chosen major and potentially increases time-to-degree. At a more mundane level, members simply have not been able to fully review the volume of material submitted here with the care the committee usually takes for other proposals. The committee expressed sincere hope that this does not cause problems during the review process in Albany.

Second, members have become increasingly uncomfortable with the external pressures being brought on this committee. The Committee has been told that it must approve these majors, meet over the summer to do so, and do a semester’s worth of work in three meetings – so that the university would not lose money. This kind of pressure jeopardizes the Committee’s ability to carry out their responsibilities, which is to ensure the academic quality of Stony Brook course offerings. The haste with which the committee has approved these majors and courses compromises the integrity of the approval process and of the curriculum itself.

Theatre Arts
The proposed changes to the major in Theatre were approved.

Women’s Studies
The following course was approved: AFH/EGL/WST 382-G Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora.
The committee approved changes to the prerequisites for the following courses:
WST 310 Former prereq: 12 credits in the social and behavioral sciences Add: or WST major or minor, or WST 102, or WST 301, or WST/PHI 284, or 6 credits of departmentally approved courses
WST 365 Former prereq: WST major or minor, or WST 102, or WST 103, or ARH 101 or 102 Add: or WST 301, or WST/PHI 284, or 6 credits of departmentally approved courses
WST 401, 402 Seminar in Women's Studies Former prereq: WST major or minor, or WST 102, or WST 103, or 6 credits of WST or related classes in other departments (approved listed in the WST office); and at least one other course specified when the topic is announced Add: or WST 301, or WST/PHI 284
WST 475, 476 Former prereq: Permission of department Change to: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor; WST major or minor

Respectfully submitted,
Kane Gillespie