Faculty

melissa bank

MELISSA BANK is the author of the best-selling story collections The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing and The Wonder Spot. She received the Nelson Algren Award for short fiction from the Chicago Tribune and holds an M.F.A. from Cornell University. Her work has been translated into 33 languages.


 


billy collins

BILLY COLLINS is the author of nine collections of poetry, most recently Horoscopes for the Dead (Random House, 2011). Others titles include Questions About Angels, The Art of Drowning, Sailing Alone Around the Room, Nine Horses, Ballistics and Picnic, Lightning. He is also the editor of three anthologies: Poetry 180: A Turning Back to Poetry, 180 More: Extraordinary Poems for Everyday, and Bright Wings: An Illustrated Anthology of Bird Poems. His poems have been published in a variety of periodicals including The New Yorker, Harper's, The Atlantic, and The American Scholar, and he appears regularly in The Best American Poetry. A Guggenheim Fellow and a New York Public Library "Literary Lion," he is a Distinguished Professor at Lehman College, City University of New York, and a Distinguished Fellow of the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College. He served as New York State Poet (2004-5) and United States Poet Laureate (2001-2003). This fall will see the publication of a second new and selected collection titled Aimless Love


cheever

SUSAN CHEEVER, whose latest is the biography Louisa May Alcott, is the best-selling author of thirteen previous books, including five novels and the memoirs Note Found in a Bottle and Home Before Dark. Her work has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and won the Boston Globe Winship Medal. She is a Guggenheim Fellow, a member of the Corporation of Yaddo, and a member of the Author's Guild Council. She teaches in the Bennington College M.F.A. program and lives in New York City with her family.


jules feiffer

JULES FEIFFER’s Pulitzer-winning and internationally syndicated cartoon ran for 42 years in the Village Voice. His sensibility permeates a wide range of creative work: from his Obie-winning play Little Murders, to his screenplay for Carnal Knowledge, to his Oscar-winning anti-military short subject animation Munro. Other works include the Tony nominee Knock Knock, and the Pulitzer nominee Grown-Ups, as well as his screenplays for Popeye and I Want to Go Home, best screenplay winner at the Venice Film Festival. Taking inspiration from his three daughters, he has reinvented himself as a children’s book author with the award-winning books, Bark George, I Lost My Bear, and The Man in the Ceiling. Feiffer's next project, a noir satire in graphic novel form due out next year, is called Kill My Mother.


ursula hegi

URSULA HEGI is the author of 12 books. Her Burgdorf Cycle encompasses 4 of her novels: Stones from the River, Floating in My Mother's Palm, The Vision of Emma Blau, and now Children and Fire.  Hegi's work has been translated into many languages, and her awards include the Italian Grinzane Cavour, an NEA Fellowship, and a PEN/Faulkner Award. She has taught at Barnard College, the University of California at Irvine, and Bread Loaf. She has also served as a juror for the National Book Awards and the National Book Critics Circle. A bi-cultural writer, Ursula didn’t plan to set nearly half of her work in Europe and the other half in the Americas—but that's how the pages have opened for her, reflecting what it is like to be an immigrant.


mary karr

Though most widely known for her best-selling memoirs, MARY KARR regards herself primarily as a poet. A 2004 Guggenheim Fellow in poetry, she has written four volumes of verse, most recently, Sinners Welcome. But the critical and popular success of her first memoir, The Liars’ Club, which remained on The New York Times bestseller list for over a year, ensured her an elevated standing among writers of memoir. Her second memoir, Cherry, was also a New York Times bestseller. Her most recent book in this series, Lit: A Memoir, is the story of her alcoholism, recovery, and conversion to Catholicism.

 


matt klam

MATTHEW KLAM was named one of the 20 best young fiction writers in America by The New Yorker in 1999. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim, a PEN/Robert Bingham Award, an NEA grant, a Whiting Writers' Award, and an O. Henry Award. His first book, Sam the Cat and Other Stories (Vintage), was selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times and Esquire, was chosen by Borders Books for their New Voices Series, and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book of the Year. His work has been featured in The New Yorker, GQ, Harper’s, Nerve, and The New York Times Magazine, where he is a contributing writer. He has taught creative writing at the University of Michigan, American University, and Stockholm University in Sweden.


victor lavalle

VICTOR LaVALLE is the author of the short story collection Slapboxing with Jesus, three novels, The Ecstatic, Big Machine, and The Devil in Silver, and an ebook-only novella, Lucretia and the Kroons. He has been the recipient of numerous awards including a Whiting Writers' Award, a United States Artists Ford Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the key to Southeast Queens. He was raised in Queens, New York. He now lives in Washington Heights with his wife and children. He teaches at Columbia University. He can be kind of hard to reach, but he still loves you.


patricia mccormick

PATRICIA MCCORMICK, a 2006 finalist for the National Book Award, is the author of four critically acclaimed novels – Purple Heart , a suspenseful psychological novel that explores the killing of a 10-year-old boy in Iraq; Sold , a deeply moving account of sexual trafficking; My Brother’s Keeper , a realistic view of teenage substance abuse and Cut, an intimate portrait of one teenager’s struggle with self-injury. Her books have earned many honors: Sold was named by Publishers Weekly as one of Best 100 Books of the Year and was selected by the American Library Association as one of the Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults in 2006. Cut was an ALA Best Book for Teenagers. McCormick was named a New York Foundation of the Arts fellow in 2004. She is also the winner of the 2009 German Peace Prize for Youth Literature. She is a graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and lives in Manhattan.


heather mchugh

HEATHER MCHUGH has been teaching and writing poems for 40 years (University of Washington, Seattle; Warren Wilson low-residency MFA; and others). Her most recent collection of poems is Upgraded To Serious. In 2012 she started CAREGIFTED (caregifted.org), a program to provide respite getaways to long-term family caregivers of the severely disabled.







TÉA OBREHT was born in 1985 in the former Yugoslavia, and spent her childhood in Cyprus and Egypt before eventually immigrating to the United States in 1997. Her writing has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper’s, Zoetrope: All-Story, The New York Times, and The Guardian, and has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories and The Best American Non-Required Reading. Her first novel, The Tiger’s Wife, was published by Random House in 2011. She has been named by The New Yorker as one of the twenty best American fiction writers under forty and included in the National Book Foundation’s list of 5 Under 35. Téa Obreht lives in Ithaca, New York.


roger rosenblatt

ROGER ROSENBLATT's essays for Time magazine have won two George Polk awards, among others. His television essays for the NewsHour on PBS have won the Peabody and the Emmy. He is the author of six off-Broadway plays and 15 books, published in 13 languages. They include the New York Times bestsellers Kayak Morning, Unless It Moves the Human Heart, and Making Toast, a memoir of his family, which initially appeared as an essay in The New Yorker. Other books are the novels Beet and Lapham Rising, another bestseller, as were Rules for Aging and Children of War, winner of the Robert F. Kennedy book prize. His one-man show, Free Speech in America, was cited by the Times as one of the 10 best plays of 1991. In 2008, he was appointed Distinguished Professor of English and Writing at Stony Brook.


grace schulman

GRACE SCHULMAN's seventh collection of poems, Without a Claim, is forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in Fall, 2013. She is the author of Days of Wonder: New and Selected Poems, which was selected by Library Journal as one of the “best poetry books” of 2002, and was a finalist for the Phi Beta Kappa Award of that year; and The Paintings of Our Lives, a selection of the Academy of American Poets’ Book Club. Among her honors are the Aiken Taylor Award for poetry, the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, New York University's Distinguished Alumni Award, and a Fellowship from the New York Council on the Arts. Her poems have received three Pushcart prizes. Editor of The Poems of Marianne Moore (Viking, 2003), she is Distinguished Professor of English at Baruch College, CUNY. Her poems, essays, and translations have appeared widely in journals, here and abroad. Schulman is former director of the Poetry Center, 92nd Street Y, 1974-84, and former poetry editor of The Nation, 1971-2006. She lives in New York City and East Hampton, N. Y. with her husband, Jerome.


meg wolitzer

MEG WOLITZER is a novelist whose works include The Interestings, The Uncoupling, The Ten-Year Nap, The Position and The Wife. Her short fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories and The Pushcart Prize. Wolitzer has taught creative writing at the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop, Columbia University, Skidmore College, the University of Houston, Boston University and Barnard College. In the fall she will be a visiting artist at Princeton University's Atelier program.


 

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*Participating authors subject to change. Schedule of events will be forthcoming.