PHILOSOPHY 610: PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS AFTER DERRIDA

Spring Semester 2005

Tuesdays 3:30-6:30 p.m.

Hugh J. Silverman

 

Before Derrida, continental aesthetic theory in the mid-20th century was shaped by Heidegger’s “Origin of the Work of Art”, Dufrenne’s account of the “aesthetic object” and Merleau-Ponty’s notions of “visibility” and “the chiasm.”  With Derrida’s The Truth in Painting (1978), following upon writings such as Spurs: Nietzsche’s Styles (1972), aesthetic theory was again framed by the question of “truth.”  With Lyotard, the “sublime” returned alongside the psychoanalytic and feminist accounts of “signifying chains,” “the semiotic and the choric,” and “the fluidity of the interval” (Lacan, Kristeva, Irigaray).  Now, in the wake of Derrida, signs and symptoms, dialectically woven into readings of film (Zizek), the tactile “sense of the world” (Nancy), and the questions of “the end of modernity” (Vattimo) and postmodern “shadows of art” (Perniola) mark out some new directions for the relations between philosophy and the arts.  The seminar will retrace this itinerary and ask “whither aesthetic theory?” after Derrida.

 

 

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