CLT 603: POSTMODERNISMS

FALL SEMESTER 2005

Prof. Hugh J. Silverman

Mondays 7:00-10:00 p.m.

THE NEW HUMANITIES BUILDING

2052

What does it mean to be postmodern? What are the differences between the modern and the postmodern? What is the relation between postmodernism and post-modernity? How have those differences been articulated by various contemporary literary, philosophical, and art  theorists? In what sense are there many different postmodernisms? In the post-Sept 11 world, how does postmodern thinking help to understand these significant events in contemporary cultures and societies?

The purpose of this seminar is to articulate what is meant by the postmodern and postmodernism, to read a number of contemporary theorists who have addressed this issue directly or indirectly, and to explore how these terms are appropriate for the reading of literary, art, architectural, and theoretical texts. The seminar will develop what is meant by the postmodern sublime, postmodern textuality, and postmodern politics. Readings will address specifically debates around deconstruction, postmodern hermeneutics, and postmodernism in the arts and in political theory.

Texts will include selections from the writings of Foucault, Barthes, Kristeva, Derrida, Deleuze, Lyotard, Baudrillard, Perniola, Nancy, and Stiegler-Derrida

 

CLT 603: POSTMODERNISMS (FALL 05) TEXTS:

DATE(S) AUTHOR TITLE IMAGE NOTES PROTOCOL

29 AUG

& 12 SEPT

(no class - labor day - 5 sept)

Foucault THE ORDER OF THINGS (1966)    
  Barthes THE PLEASURE OF THE TEXT (1973)
   
  Kristeva: THE PORTABLE KRISTEVA  (ed. Oliver) (1974+)  Book Cover    
  Baudrillard: SIMULACRA AND SIMULATIONS (1983) Book Cover    
  Deleuze FRANCIS BACON (1981)       
  Derrida ACTS OF LITERATURE (80s)     
  Lyotard

THE INHUMAN (1988)                    

   
  Nancy: THE SENSE OF THE WORLD (1993)    
  Perniola: ART AND ITS SHADOW (2003)        
  Derrida / Stiegler: ECHOGRAPHIES (2000?)       
    Recommended Background Reading      
  Silverman` TEXTUALITES: BETWEEN HERMENEUTICS AND DECONSTRUCTION