Stony Brook University Office of Research Services

Contact

Office of Technology Licensing and Industry Relations
Phone: 631-632-9009

Engineering & Applied Sciences

Assistant Director
Donna Tumminello
(631) 632-4163

Life Sciences

Assistant Director
Jennifer Hsieh
(631) 632-1361

Licensing Specialists
Sean Boykevisch
(631) 632-6952

Adam De Rosa
(631) 632-6955

Success Stories in Licensing

CaviStat™ - A Natural Super Saliva Complex for Fighting Tooth Decay

CaviStat™ is the first in a new class of fluoride-free, cavity fighting compounds that are designed to mimic and integrate the powerful alkali producing, acid neutralizing and remineralizing benefits of saliva. CaviStat™ is based on over 30 years of research in saliva chemistry by researchers in the Department of Oral Biology and Pathology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. CaviStat™ was exclusively licensed to Ortek Therapeutics Inc. by The Research Foundation of State University of New York. CaviStat™ can be considered a natural "super saliva complex" that could be the new paradigm for fighting tooth decay in all age groups. By mimicking nature, CaviStat™ is able to simultaneously attack the several stages of the tooth decay process.

Ortek Therapeutics Inc. is committed to the development of innovative oral care products based on a strategic alliance with The Research Foundation of State University of New York and the scientific expertise of researchers from Department of Oral Biology and Pathology from Stony Brook University. Ortek Therapeutics was founded in 1998 and is a privately held company. Ortek’s products also include BasicMints™ a new experimental drug in pre-clinical testing designed to prevent the formation of tooth decay. This soft, chewable sugarless tablet contains CaviStat™.

Oracea® - An Effective Treatment for Rosacea

Oracea LogoOracea® is the first and only oral therapy approved by the FDA to treat Rosacea, a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Oracea® is unique because it contains an anti-inflammatory dose of doxycycline. Unlike traditional doxycyclines, Oracea doesn’t work by killing bacteria. It works by controlling inflammation. Oracea® is based on over 20 years of research in chemically modified tetracycline by researchers in the Department of Oral Biology and Pathology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Oracea® was exclusively licensed to CollaGenex Pharmaceuticals by The Research Foundation of State University of New York.

CollaGenex Pharmaceuticals was committed to the development of anti-inflammatory drugs based on chemically modified tetracycline (CMTs) which relied solely on the scientific expertise of researchers from Department of Oral Biology and Pathology from Stony Brook University. In February 2008, CollaGenex Pharmaceuticals was acquired by Galderma Pharma S.A., a global specialty pharmaceutical company focused on dermatology, for approximately $420 million.

ReoPro - The First Monoclonal Antibody Drug to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

abciximabReoPro - Abciximab (previously known as c7E3 Fab) - is a glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor that binds to the GP IIb/IIIa receptor on the platelet, blocking interaction of fibrinogen with the GP IIb/IIIa receptor, the final common pathway to platelet aggregation. ReoPro is mainly used during and after coronary artery procedures like angioplasty to prevent platelets from sticking together and causing thromus formation within the coronary artery.

ReoPro was developed based on over 20 years of platelet research by researchers in the Department of Hematology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. ReoPro was exclusively licensed to Centocor of Malvern, Pa., USA by The Research Foundation of State University of New York, and is manufactured by Centocor, B.V., in Leiden, the Netherlands. Eli Lilly and Company markets and distributes the product worldwide except in Japan.


Biological Pacemaker

cohen-pacemakerA long-term partnership with Boston Scientific has enabled faculty researchers at SUNY Stony Brook and Columbia University, to develop cell based biological pacemakers that will someday replace existing electronic pacemaker devices and optimize the therapeutic approach to cardiac pacing.

SUNY Stony Brook’s Director of the Institute for Molecular Cardiology, Dr. Ira Cohen and Dr. Peter Brink, Chairman of the Department of Physiology and Biophysics have teamed with Columbia University’s Director of the Center for Molecular Therapeutics, Dr. Michael Rosen and Columbia Professor of Pharmacology Dr. Richard Robinson to develop a gene and cell based biological pacemaker that varies the heart’s beats to fit an individual body’s needs, as required during variations in exercise or emotion.

This ground breaking technology utilizes a family of genes responsible for natural pacemaking that were packaged and delivered to the heart using adult human mysenchymal stem cells or a viral vector. The engineered stem cells, when placed in a localized region of the heart, electrically communicate directly with the surrounding endogenous heart tissue. This interaction stimulates the heart and generates a heartbeat similar to that of the heart's natural pacemaker. The viral vector/gene therapy approach uses the same pacemaker genes and results in the ectopic expression in endogenous cardiac muscle cells. These cells integrate the gene construct into the heart's natural electrical circuitry and produce an outcome similar to that generated by the stem cells.

Boston Scientific’s commitment to the development and optimization of innovative cardiac treatments has resulted in numerous patented technologies created by the collaborative efforts of The New York State Research Foundation, researchers from SUNY Stony Brook’s Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Columbia University’s Department of Pharmacology.

Virtual Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy
Dr. Arie Kaufman, Chairman of the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University, showcases a 3-D image generated by the Virtual Colonoscopy software he invented with a team of computer scientists and radiologists at Stony Brook.

Stony Brook University President, Shirley Strum Kenny announced today that Siemens Healthcare Sector of Germany has signed a landmark non-exclusive license agreement with the University. The license agreement is for the portfolio of innovations related to performing three-dimensional virtual examination, navigation and visualization, the most common use for which is “virtual colonoscopy.” The fast, safe and cost effective procedure is based on patented diagnostic 3-D imaging software, techniques and a computer system developed by a Stony Brook University research team of computer-scientists and radiologists led by its inventor, Dr. Arie E. Kaufman, a Distinguished Professor and Chairman of the Department of Computer Science. It was first patented in 1996.

Dr. Arie Kaufman, Chairman of the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University, showcases a 3-D image generated by the Virtual Colonoscopy software he invented with a team of computer scientists and radiologists at Stony Brook.

3-D Virtual Colonoscopy was approved for Colon Cancer Screening in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004. This innovative computer graphics technology puts computed tomography (CT) images of the patient’s abdomen together into a high quality 3-D computerized model of the patient’s colon. This allows a radiologist to virtually “fly through” the patient’s colon, from beginning to end, and around all folds, seeing 100 percent of its surface as opposed to the estimated 77 percent with conventional colonoscopy, and thoroughly searching for polyps, the precursor of colon cancer, that are as small as a few millimeters. By contrast, a conventional colonoscopy using a fiber optic endoscope is invasive and expensive, and requires a day of preparation involving harsh laxatives and usually a day for the procedure since the patient must be sedated. A conventional colonoscopy also carries the risk of perforation of the colon wall and even a small risk of death.

Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide that claims about 677,000 men and women annually, according to the World Health Organization; more than 130,000 new cases are diagnosed every year in the United States. However, studies show that much more than half of all Americans 50 and older aren't getting colonoscopies, possibly because the procedure is scary, requires sedation and carries a tiny risk of bowel perforation.

New data published in the September 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine on the efficacy of CT colonographic screening (i.e., virtual colonoscopy screening) indicates that in a study of 2600 asymptomatic adults, 50 years of age or older, CT colonographic screening identified 90% of subjects with adenomas or cancers measuring 10 mm or larger in diameter. According to the authors, these findings augment published data on the role of CT colonography in screening patients with an average risk of colorectal cancer. And, according to a report in the October 28 edition of the Wall Street Journal, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the US Federal agency that administers Medicare and Medicaid, is conducting a review to determine if the cost of virtual colonoscopies should be covered. The article indicated that CMS will complete the review process by February 2009.

“The first study of results of virtual colonoscopy paid by insurance showed that only 6.4% of patients required follow up with optical colonoscopy for polyp removal,” said Dr. Kaufmann. “Virtual colonoscopy is therefore poised to become the procedure of choice for mass screening for colonic polyps. If all patients 50 years of age and older will participate in these screening programs, over 92 percent of colorectal cancer will be prevented and more than 600,000 lives could be saved worldwide every year through this early detection,” he said.

The procedure takes less than 15 minutes and typically requires the patient to drink a contrast solution, which eliminates the need for a harsh purgative prior to the scanning. The patient, without being sedated and after a small tube is inserted in the rectum to inflate the colon with CO2, lays on his/her back and then stomach while a CT scan takes pictures of the abdomen and pelvis in just several seconds.  “Stony Brook’s work on virtual colonoscopy is a great example of how research is and will be the key to economic vitality in New York State,” said James Weyhenmeyer, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Research at the State University of New York. “Stony Brook’s investment in Dr. Kaufman’s work to bring it from the lab to the marketplace serves as a model for SUNY campuses and New York’s leaders.”